Wood handling gloves.

ironspider Posted By ironspider, Feb 28, 2014 at 9:14 PM

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  1. ironspider

    ironspider
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    I go through the rubber gloves like underwear, I keep getting he's in the fingers.

    Anyone have a good recommendation for a strong yet flexible glove, thin enough to use with a saw and to handle wood?
     
  2. bmblank

    bmblank
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    Jan 17, 2013
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    The Kevlar gloves with the plasti-dipped palms work great. They offer a whole lot lot protection than you'd expect, too, as thin as they are.
    Not all are Kevlar. Kevlar provides some cut protection, but the non-Kevlars are still good.
     
  3. ironspider

    ironspider
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    That's what I'm using, but I keep wearing out the fingers handling wood. Isn't there something better?
     
  4. wahoowad

    wahoowad
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    Not sure about better but I like standard work gloves. They break in fast after handling a few splits, are pretty durable and provide good feel for whatever you are handling. Run about $10/pair at Lowes. I never seem to find them on sale though.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. ironspider

    ironspider
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    Actual lay I'm using latex dipped not Kevlar. I'll try the Kevlar.

    What about pig skin? Anyone use then.
     
  6. GENECOP

    GENECOP
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    Amazon Prime....three pack, leather work, all sizes...$26.00....
     
  7. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot
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    (I'm assuming this is not when it's cold.)

    I use the Harbor Freight cheap gloves. They last a while, then the fingers get holes, but they're cheap. They're not all leather, but the wear parts are.
     
  8. Ehouse

    Ehouse
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    How about a piece of kevlar tape for a wrap or glued on pad at the tip?
     
  9. WES999

    WES999
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  10. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly
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    I get mine from HF.....I think they're Safety Wear.....Yellow, with a rubber coating on the palm and fingers, cheap, and give a lot of grip....almost too much grip when I'm using the saw.....a tip from a friend...when using them in the cold, wear Latex Gloves under them to keep warm;)
     
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  11. Osage

    Osage
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    Normally I do not use gloves. But at my wifes urging I bought some of those super wizbang mechanics gloves with some kind of mean looking critter embroidered on them. After one day of cutting they already had holes in them. As far as durability I have found that the plain old leather ones last the longest. Still I would rather work without gloves. Have yet to wearout my hands in 63 years.
     
  12. bmblank

    bmblank
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    Leather and knit gloves are the only ones that will last. I think the only thing harder on gloves than wood is asphalt shingles.
    Edit. And concrete blocks.
     
  13. BobUrban

    BobUrban
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    two schools of thought super cheap or super expensive. Both have advantages but I find the longevity advantage of quality does not supersede the price point. Others mileage varies. I use rubber dipped cotton and wrap the tips with duct tape. Works well for me.

    Fire wood eats gloves of all quality!
     
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  14. CenterTree

    CenterTree
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    I think TWO different types are needed. One thin pair to use while running the saw. And then switch to a tougher leather pair for handling the cut log pieces.

    I dislike wearing gloves with the saw unless they are the thin rubber coated type.

    I found these NICE leather gloves at Walmart for $14. They are pre-curved to fit great.
    https://www.stone-breaker.com/p-8-the-rancher.aspx

    PS: Sorry to hear about your underwear troubles.;lol;lol
     
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  15. Firewood Bandit

    Firewood Bandit
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    I just bought a dozen Atlas Fit thermal for $42 delivered. They aren't all that warm but looks like they are going to be great for handling firewood. The palms and bottoms of the fingers are rubber dipped.

    The fit very snug and have great dexterity.

    http://www.atlasfitgloves.com/
     
  16. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd
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    I use Atlas gloves for all firewood processing. Yes the rubber part wears off the tips of the fingers but I still get lots of mileage with no rubber on the tips.
     
  17. redmule

    redmule
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    I like the leather gloves made from buffalo hide.
     
  18. razerface

    razerface
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    If i wear thick leather gloves with thick lining(sheepskin looking),, my hands hurt at the end of a day because the lining makes the glove "slide" on my hands,, and I must grip tighter then with a thin glove.

    I buy cheep leather gloves all year when i see them at tractor, and swap meets. They can be had for 4-5 bucks a pair.
     
  19. Zare

    Zare
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    After trying all types of Gloves, I stick with the leather work gloves that Home Hardware (Canadian eh) has on sale every few months. There own brand, yellow gauntlets. And for reinforcement on the fingers when worn out =rough duct tape.
    (note--duct tape transmits heat directly from that burning log your moving around in the fire box...)!!!
    [​IMG]
    And when they are worn out completely they burn real nice..
     
  20. bmblank

    bmblank
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    The thing I hate about most gloves is how the cuff opens up like a funnel, shooting saw dust straight down to your fingertips. That's why I like the cheap knit one with the elastic wristband.
     
  21. bassJAM

    bassJAM
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    I like the Wells Lamont "Drivers"

    [​IMG]

    Been using these since I was a kid baling hay, and they seem to hold up well enough. When it's really cold I slip a pair of military surplus wool liner gloves under them. It takes a few minutes for the leather to stretch with the liner, but eventually they do so you keep that tactile feeling like a thick pair of Mechanix gloves.

    Back when I did a winter of stone masonry and my hands were always grabbing 20-80lb stones and washing them off with a sponge I used a pair of rubber dipped gloves, which held up pretty good against the stones and kept my hands dry. I still have a pair I'd probably use if I even had to handle wood that was wet.

    [​IMG]

    Overall I prefer using bare hands though, and do any time the weather permits. I sit in an office all day so any time I do "real" work I go gloveless to try to keep at least a few callouses on my hands!
     
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  22. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran
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    These are my favorites. Come in three sizes from Harbor Freight. On sale now for $1.99 a pair. They are warm in winter, cool enough for summer, great grip, nice and snug around the wrist, and no splinters. Wear 'em out, throw 'em away, use the next pair. (Sorry, I couldn't find a larger image...:)).


    [​IMG]
     
  23. paul bunion

    paul bunion
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    That is exactly what I do. A pair of coated gloves for running the saw and cheap leather gloves for handling the wood. I usually get 5 cords from a pair of leather gloves.
     
  24. bigbarf48

    bigbarf48
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    Pretty much this

    Ive used standard leather work gloves, and they get holes in the fingers. Mechanix gloves lasted me maybe a couple weeks. I started using those rubber dipped ones and they've held up alright for the price. I think the way t go is the cheapest you can get in bulk and replace as needed
     
  25. Macpolski

    Macpolski
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    Atlas 300 all the way for me. Feel, dexterity, and decent grip. Use them for cutting, splitting and stacking. Oh yeah, inexpensive and hold up very well. Only one downside for me - my hands tend to sweat in warmer weather with gloves, hence the gloves tend to smell after a while.
     
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