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Wood ID please, driving me nuts

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by fabsroman, Feb 1, 2013.

  1. BobUrban

    BobUrban Minister of Fire

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    That is the best plan!! IMO

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  2. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    That Rule of Thumb doesn't really make that much sense.

    So, at 20 degrees fahrenheit wood will dry twice as fast as at 0 degrees. Same goes for 200 degrees versus 180 degrees.

    Plus, most on here say that wind is way more important than temp, and around here it is way more windy during fall, winter, and spring compared to summer.

    I think you would have to do some sort of experiment to convince me that every 20 degrees in temp makes wood dry twice as fast. There would need to be a control at 100 degrees, then another at 80 degrees, and another at 60 degrees. They would need to be kept at those temps for quite a while and they would have to come from the same spot on the tree too. It would be a fun experiment though. Don't think I have the time or energy for it though.
  3. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    It's a rule of thumb, not a law of the universe. It's likely to be less accurate at extreme temperatures, but it's worth noting that wood does dry some even when it's very cold (well below freezing).
    That's generally true, up to a point. Wind can quickly dry off a stack of wood that's been rained on, and in still air, relative humidity immediately around the wood surfaces can build up and slow drying considerably; some air movement is necessary to keep the moisture leaving the wood moving away from the pile. That doesn't mean a 20mph breeze is twice is good as a 10mph breeze; it isn't.
    Those experiments have been done; that's where the rule of thumb comes from. I'm parroting it from a professor of wood science who posts on another forum I participate in, and I think the same figure can be found in some government publications on wood processing. Anyhow, it's a widely used approximation.
  4. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    I don't recall that being said here. I have seen the statement that wind is more important than sun. I believe that the temp of the air is huge. I might have the time and energy to research that... ==c
  5. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    This is some great info thanks. I'll pass this on and the guys will think I'm very intellegent;)
  6. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    Thank you. I was so proud when I figured out how to plot that curve...
  7. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, I think you may be right. That wind is way more important than sun. Thing is, sun can raise a stack temp a decent amount. Put a thermometer in the shade and another in the sun and see what the difference is. So, sun does have a bearing on stack temp.
  8. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Jon,

    Any chance you can give me some links to that study? I would be interested in reading something like that, seeing as how seriously I have been thinking about all this wood seasoning stuff lately.
  9. Jon1270

    Jon1270 Minister of Fire

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    I don't know precisely what studies established that rule of thumb, but I can give you a lead. See this thread over on Woodweb, specifically Gene Wengert's answer. You can contact Professor Wengert through that site; he's pretty good about answering questions.
  10. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    The wood in the pictures is Black Willow, not Black Locust. Look at the width of the outer growth rings. No Black locust grows that fast when it is large. Black Locust grows fast when small but slows down as it gets larger. Black Willow (the common large, wild willow across the east) grows fast all its life. In addition to the growth rate, I don't think the wood has the right color for Black Locust.
  11. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    I am doubting it is any sort of willow. The same size piece of this stuff is about as heavy, if not heavier, than an identical size piece of green oak. This wood really is dense. I cut down a dead weeping willow in the backyard when we first moved in and that stuff was about as dense as feathers.

    It might not be black locust (which I think it is), but I seriously doubt it is any type of willow based upon its density. I'm going to let it season another full year and see if it gets down to the mid 20's.
  12. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    I tend to agree with it not being black locust. I don't know what it is but I just bucked and split a cord of Black Locust in the last few days and that is not it. Pictures aren't always great for identification, but give us some end grain and more bark pictures.
  13. nrford

    nrford Minister of Fire

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    My guess is Hickory ,and it is only a guess because there is just not much to go on in the photos.
  14. fabsroman

    fabsroman Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, I am going to try to find the time to take some bark and cross section pics tomorrow. Hickory might be a possibility, but still amazed that it is 37% since it was stacked in September 2011. Hickory would explain why it is so heavy.

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