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Wood id please

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by hma, Mar 19, 2013.

  1. hma

    hma New Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Ohio
    Any ideas? Thanks

    Attached Files:

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  2. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Northern Kentucky along the Ohio River
    Okay, I'll take a stab at it. The vertical tree/log on the left looks like black locust; the one on top running left to right (with the cut in it) looks like silver maple thats been down a while; the one under it could be from the same silver maple, but it's a bit hard to tell as it looks as though most of the bark is off. Of the 2 vertical logs on top; the one on the right kinda looks like black walnut bark and the one on the left... I won't venture to say as I can't see enough of it. So there's my best guess. :rolleyes: Now let's see what the pros from Dover have to say about it.
  3. hma

    hma New Member

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    Mar 17, 2012
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    Loc:
    Ohio
    Sorry I meant the 2 horizontal ones. The others are honey locust. Thx
  4. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Indiana
    Mulberry. This is a guess. The stuff in the back looks more like black locust than honey locust...that is not a guess.
    ScotO likes this.
  5. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Upstate NY
    Hophornbeam
    nrford and ScotO like this.
  6. Paulywalnut

    Paulywalnut Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Kennett Square, PA
    very tough with no bark and unsplit. One on the bottom looks like what I remember elm looking like
    before dutch elm disease.
  7. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    1,963
    Loc:
    southern ontario
    Hophornbeam (Ironwood).

    For some reason, they frequently grow really twisty...even in protected interior woods, so not a wind issue. I have some that spiral round and round. No fun to split. Fortunately (or unfortunately) most die before they are too big. I don't split them unless they are over about 8 inches. Let them stand dead, wait til they fall (years later), then cut them. The wood will still be fine. It can sit on the forest floor a few years and still be fine. Fabulous firewood. Let your trees grow as long as possible. Don't cut them live. Long dead trees, cut into rounds and stacked, burn beautifully after a year, but will keep many years if you have enough wood to save them. Burn them on long cold nights. Really special firewood. One big log will burn all night and put of lots of heat. Difference in heat output between Ironwood and Sugar Maple (and Beech) is very noticable.
    nrford and ScotO like this.
  8. Ralphie Boy

    Ralphie Boy Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Northern Kentucky along the Ohio River
    No giant, man-eating thorns and the bark is wrong for honey locust, thats black locust.()

    Honey Locust Bark Black Locust Bark

    honeylocust.jpg blacklocust.jpg
  9. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    NNJ
    Black Locust and Elm (guess on the horizontals if they were found without bark)
  10. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    719
    Loc:
    Southern Minnesota
    Hophornbeam
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  11. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Yeah that stuff laying horizontal looks like hophornbeam....but it also looks alot like the lilac I cut down at a job a while back. There was four HUGE shrubs, and I counted around 70-80 rings in the 'trunks' of those lilacs. Very, very dense wood, burned alot like locust........
    Applesister likes this.
  12. HDRock

    HDRock Minister of Fire

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    Grand Blanc, Mi
    Never had any but ,pics I have of Honey Locust !!!:eek:!!!:eek: Mean lookin stuff

    Honey locust1.jpg Honey locust2.jpg Honey locust3.jpg

    Thornless Honeylocust is commonly planted as a shade tree throughout the eastern United States and southern Canada, prized for its urban tolerance, near seedless character, and filtered shade.
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  13. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    I dont know how they get Honeylocust to genetically not produce thorns. But the natural growing variety here is full of thorns and usually poison ivy vines as well. And it gets that witches broom problem with multiple sprouts on its trunks. Nightmarish.

    The horizontal wood also looks like cedar the way the bark slightly spirals.
  14. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

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    SE Mass
    The only wood we have here that I know of with bark spiraling like that is american white cedar and its' swampy river growing spots are disappearing fast.
  15. nrford

    nrford Minister of Fire

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    Ironwood/Hophornbeam for sure.
  16. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    That is very, very typical Ironwood (hophornbeam) bark. It comes off in long stringy strips, and is very thin. If the round measures 8 inches, then it measures 8 inches with the bark off. . The wood often spirals as it grows. Often see lichen on the bark. Excellent firewood. Dense, durable wood. Makes great tool handles. Great for stacking wood on, if you happen to find dead young trees.(2-3 inch diameter). Bigger than that, use it for firewood. .
  17. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    Don't know the species, but that twist in it makes me think its going to be a big gnarly mess to split.

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