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Wood ID please

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Get Wood, Apr 27, 2013.

  1. Get Wood

    Get Wood Member

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    Can someone tell me what this is, a friend said he thinks it is apple. I have about a dozen scattered around and will be glad when they are all gone.

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  2. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Crab apple?
    The thorns look nasty !
    Bark similar to elm but it don't have the thorns.
  3. Get Wood

    Get Wood Member

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    They are as sharp as broken glass. Thanks
    I remember having some crab apple growing up but don't remember the thorns.
  4. paul bunion

    paul bunion Minister of Fire

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    I've never seen an apple wearing thorns. But the rest of that looks like apple. Do they have apples on them in the fall?
  5. Get Wood

    Get Wood Member

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    Didn't see any last fall (first year here) but we went south the first of November. Haven't seen any signs.
  6. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    The wild Crab apples we in WV had them.
  7. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    I don't know but if you just sawed that recently, it looks like it's ready to burn now or at least drying fast!
  8. Get Wood

    Get Wood Member

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    That is where I am from Dave. Wetzel County, how about you?
  9. Get Wood

    Get Wood Member

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    There isn't any leaves on it yet but there isn't leaves on anything here yet.
  10. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    those thorns sure look like the devilish ones of a honey locust, and the wood looks like it could be just that. Younger trees, though....
    Thistle likes this.
  11. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    I'd consider honey locust as a possible suspect.
  12. Lakeside

    Lakeside Burning Hunk

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    I vote honey locust, good BTU's
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I too was thinking honey locust. It does indeed look a bit like thorn apple and we have lots of those suckers here. If it is thorn apple, I'll guarantee it will not smell very good at all. Nasty stuff.
  14. PA. Woodsman

    PA. Woodsman Minister of Fire

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    I think what you have there is a variety of Hawthorn, possibly Cockspur Hawthorn. The cutside of the wood is too orange color to be Honey Locust and the bark is all wrong. Google Hawthorn and you will see the one called Cockspur actually has sharp needles that are used as pins according to my "National Audobon Society Field Guide to North American Trees". It also says a nickname for it is "Hog Apple". I think that is what you have there....I have burned Downy Hawthorn and it looks similiar and was good stuff!
    nrford likes this.
  15. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    I think that is some variety of Hawthorn, which is related to apples and even gets small fruits very similar to crab apples. Most hawthorns don't get thorns quite as nasty as the ones in the first picture, but there are many species of hawthorn and the size and number of thorns vary between species. The wood should be similar to apple wood.
    nrford likes this.
  16. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    Hawthorns dont have needles that grow off of needles. The first pic is Honeylocust but the 3rd/ last pic may be some other tree.
    Hawthorns have single thorns that grow off stems. Not the trunk of a tree as Honeylocust does.
    ScotO likes this.
  17. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    I looked up Cockspur Hawthorn, I guess it does have thorns branching off of thorns. The hawthorns I have here have thorns near the fruit. Never mind.
    nrford likes this.
  18. Get Wood

    Get Wood Member

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    All three pics are from the same tree. I have a few more of these and will get a pic tomorrow of the branch and trunk.
    That is the only one I have cut but they will all be coming down.
  19. midwestcoast

    midwestcoast Minister of Fire

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    A particularly nasty Hawthorn. Hawthorns are know colloquially as Thorn Apple. You can eat the little fruits and they are supposed to be healthy eating, but they taste horrible until after some hard frost. After that they just taste bad.
    Pretty good burning wood aside from the obvious hazards and its often tough splitting.
  20. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Good call on the Hawthorn everyone. Don't see those show up here often, but that's what it is.

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