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Wood Splitter Advice

Post in 'The Gear' started by reaperman, Sep 30, 2007.

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  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    I prefer to sit, but same deal...

    Playing devils advocate for the moment, as I'm not a fan of the multi-way wedges, there are two problems mentioned that are more likely with multi-wedges, especially if they are mounted on the moving ram, as opposed to the fixed stop (with the pusher on the ram) Neither is as much of a concern with a single wedge mounted perpendicular to the beam. I will speak mostly to 4-way wedges, but the same thing applies to larger ones

    1. With a single wedge the splits just fall to either side, no problem. With a multi wedge, the two splits closest to the beam are trapped between the beam and the moving wedge. If they are big splits, and especially if they are ones where the log wants to split on an angle so that the split gets bigger as you go down, the split is going to potentially be jammed into the beam by the moving wedge. If the base wedge is wide enough to push the splits off the beam this might not be a big problem.

    2. As many rounds don't want to split straight, or are harder on one side than the other, they can put a lot more torque on the piston of the hydraulic cylinder, trying to either rotate it, or make it flex. Neither is good for the seals, though again, it's not real clear how big a problem this is on a properly designed unit.

    The ram runs parallel to the beam, but the wedges are tapered, and two of the splits are going to be pushed towards the beam (or table) by the wedge "wings" that are running parallel to the beam rather than perpendicular like the two-way wedge does.

    Gooserider

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  2. Larryj24

    Larryj24 New Member

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    Gooserider,

    You are correct on the 4 way wedge. NEVER put it on the piston side! For all those reasons and more.

    However, a 4 way wedge when mounted on the beam IS SUPPOSED TO FLOAT! In other words, it is not Fixed in position. It needs to ride up a shaft (usually the existing splitter wedge) as it moves through the wood. This elimintaes the Jam problem. This is the ONLY WAY a 4 way wedge is designed to work on an I Beam Splitter.
  3. LarryD

    LarryD Member

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    That is exactly how mine works. You would be amazed at how much the 4-way rides up and down the fixed wedge.

    Larry D
  4. Larryj24

    Larryj24 New Member

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    Larry D,
    Some might be amazed, but not I. I have read too many threads where people are trying to make a Horizontal/Vertical as good as a horizontal. Some people don't understand all they sacrifice with a vertical. I guess because at one point I was doing some production of firewood and learned it then. You want the I Beam at working height so your not bending over. Table so you can do resplits, though not necessary with a 4 way wedge, and of course the ultimate is the conveyor belt. Also learned back then why you want the splitter to push away from the hitch. Nothing worse than having to dig your splitter out of a fresh split pile!
  5. Woodrat

    Woodrat New Member

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    NE MA
    Horiz/vert splitters always reminded me of the "camel ==a horse designed by a committee" saying. The height will seldom be what is comfortable for your back in the horizontal position. Even if you could get around the fact that multiple wedge adaptors to be able to move, I don't think I'd want to be (or see anyone else) nicked by one of those "other" wedges while operating the valve---unlikely-yes------impossible-NO. I've seen stranger things happen.
    Purely from a "time" standpoint, hydraulic splitters are not productive enough because of thier slow cycle times unless outfitted with multiple wedges. I have a Brute/Timberwolf TW3HD with 6 way wedge on my tractor and love it (high production& low noise. That being said-- if I had to drop to one splitter, it would be my other one--a Super Split that I changed to an electric motor to get rid of the noise.
    This machine is 20-25 years old and in all probability will still be working fine in another 25. My son would "take it of my hands" anytime. My point is that with any wood up to 16", I could probably run "head to head " with someone operating my tractor because of the cycle time factor. The Super Split has about a 2 second cycle-- I use a pulp hook to grab & position (and reposition) the pieces, so basically I can get six splits off a round in the same time my tractor with the six way wedge completes its cycle!
    They are pricey- but well worth it. I'd tell you to watch for one used, but you're very unlikely to ever see one- I know,I've looked!
  6. LarryD

    LarryD Member

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    We rented verticle machines and I quickly came to the conclusion that they were harder on my back than a Horizontal machine. That is what lead me to buy our splitter. The design of the timberwolf is to get the working parts of the machine higher up, so you are stooping over less. I think vert vs hor is very much personal preference. For me horizontal is far more productive. That is my opinion. Add a four way wedge, log lift and the table and you can split wood for many hours and not feel like you've killed yourself. The up front cost is worth it.

    Larry D
  7. triptester

    triptester Feeling the Heat

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    Here is a link to a line of vertical splitters that you don't have to bend over to use .

    Available options are log-lift, attached conveyor, and even self propelled.


    http://www.timberdevil.com/products.html
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