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Wood Stacking Kriss-Cross

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Burner73, Jun 15, 2009.

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  1. Burner73

    Burner73 Member

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    I noticed in many of your pictures you cross the ends of the wood pile and then stack all the pieces in the center the in the same direction.
    I just checked my "uncovered" unidirectional wood pile. A lot of the wood is rather wet and almost looks like it will begin to rot soon. I was hoping not to cover it but it looks like I will have to.

    I re-stacked some of the wood and tried crossing the direction of the wood for the "Whole Pile". It definitely wastes tons of space but it looks like the wood will get much more air flow and dry better.

    Has anyone stacked this way who does not have a wood shed? Also I was trying to devise a way to lay the splits like bricks so the "mortor joints" don't lineup. THis would give much more stability to the pile. Haven't really figured out a good way to do it...yet

    Pics are welcome.

    TIA

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  2. Shipper50

    Shipper50 Minister of Fire

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    I stacked some hickory last year the way your talking about and in the pic below, it seemed to dry faster as I burned it with only 6-7 months of drying this way. It was dry enough to use in my wood furnace in my basement and keep the house somewhat warmish.

    Shipper

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  3. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    It takes a lot more time to do it. It also is hard with certain types of wood. I have made a large cubes of crisscrossed black
    walnut. Its about 6x6x6 on one huge pallet. I'll know in the fall this year how well it did. Hopefully its not a nice living space for critters.
  4. Bubbavh

    Bubbavh Feeling the Heat

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    My wife would leave me if I started stacking my wood like that!
  5. Shipper50

    Shipper50 Minister of Fire

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    I wont ask why, but I don't have a wife. :smirk:

    Shipper
  6. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    Burner your wood is probably wet from the rain we had the last couple days...don't worry about it and leave it uncovered till Thanksgiving. The crisscrossing helps prevent the rolls from collapsing ...adds a measure of stability. As long as the wood is off the ground ...like on pallets it won't rot.
  7. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    I used to 'free stack' like the OP mentioned but nicking a stack with the edge of our snow plow blade this winter made me re-think how I was stacking. I switched to this method and I love it - stacks go up real fast and they are seasoning very well:

    [​IMG]

    Shari
  8. wldm09

    wldm09 New Member

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    Shari - do you have the wood stacked in two rows? Those look pretty simple and slick...
  9. jebatty

    jebatty Minister of Fire

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    Wood needs good air flow to dry well, or a long time with poorer air flow. It also is impt to raise the stack off the ground, on pallets, 6x6's, etc., to get airflow underneath and prevent absorption of ground moisture in the lower layers. Whatever stacking method accomplishes this is fine. I use the criss-crossed ends and then fill the middle only because that holds the stacks without external support. Don't cover with a tarp, don't cover the sides, and don't cover with anything without good airflow between the cover and the stack. You don't want condensation dripping down on top of the stack. No cover is better than a bad cover. I cover with scrap corrugated steel panels.

    I cut my pieces at 18", stacks are 8' long and about 4' high, and are 3x18" wide. I align the stacks so the prevailing winds blow into the stacks broadside. If you have stacks side by side, leave plenty of space between the stacks to promote airflow and allow easy access to fill the wheelbarrow or whatever you use to move wood to your stove location.
  10. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    Yes, there are two rows with air space between the rows. In addition to the boo-boo with the snow plow this winter (when multiple rows got knocked over) I feel this method is a whole lot safer when grandchildren and neighbor children coming visiting. I should take a comparison photo to show how the stacks have seasoned (shrunk) in just the last month...

    Shari
  11. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    The only reason I criss cross the end of the stacks is to keep the stacksends vertical. Stability. The goal has nothing to do with dryness.

    In fact, I am going to start stacking with t-bar posts on the end this year to eliminate the need for the criss cross. Stacking is the least fun part of the process and I want it to be as quick as possible.

    Oh and I don't go much past four feet tall on my stacks to give good stability.
  12. Jamess67

    Jamess67 Feeling the Heat

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    Great minds think alike. That is exactally what I do.
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I agree with Highbeam except for the t-posts. And I don't think using t-posts will speed the process as stacking the ends don't take much more time than the rest. Many times I also make kindling and stack that in the ends.

    My stacks are also 4' tall. Any taller any that will cause problems.
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