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Wood/Woodstove usage winter forecast 2006/2007

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Roospike, Sep 5, 2006.

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  1. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
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    Loc:
    Eastern Nebraska
    Long-range Weather Forecast: A Chilly, Premature Fall With Torrential Rains & Early Winter Season Ahead, Harvest Crops Quick This Year: Theo's AstroMet Weather Outlook**
    Posted by: Theo (IP Logged)
    Date: May 30, 2006 05:53PM


    **Updated: August 1, 2006**

    Astrometeorological Weather Outlook
    A Very Stormy Winter 2007 Arrives Early This Year
    By Theodore White/Astrometeorologist

    American & Canadian Farmers urged to plan for
    a early harvest this year because of early winter
    climate conditions arriving by late October 2006.
    (**Farmers - see info below on Spring 2007 conditions.)

    Prepare for a chiller than normal, and fast
    autumn, and a early, and stormier, colder, winter season
    just ahead. Winter 2007 ~ in my astromet forecast ~
    officially begins early November 2006.

    General Climate Conditions This Fall & Early Winter ~

    Colder, moist atmosphere
    Sudden Frosts (as early as August)
    Torrential rains (late October & all of November)
    Flash Flooding
    Gusty & Damaging Winds (end of Nov./all of December)
    Low cloud ceilings
    Widespread & Thick Fogs (October/November)
    Very Slippery Conditions

    The Coming Winter ~
    Heavier Snows That Are Early This Year
    Widespread Icy Conditions
    Blizzards & Gusty Winds
    Below Average Colder Temperatures
    Wind-Chills

    The months of September & October 2006 see strong
    lunar transits, as the Moon's force raises worldwide
    ocean tides higher than usual. Expect stormy conditions
    that include flooding from tropical events like
    hurricanes, and torrential rains to cause serious
    problems throughout the world. Preparing for heavy
    rains, and flooding in those months is wise, as well
    for the coming colder than normal fall season, and
    early winter conditions.

    Look for below average temperatures - chilly air -
    especially early mornings, and during the days, in the
    months of August, and September. Frost will not
    be uncommon during August/September. Very cool
    temperatures in New England, the Northeast, Upper
    Midwest, and regions of the Mid-Atlantic & SE. Even
    areas of the Pacific Northwest and Northern
    California will see cooler than normal temperatures
    increasing in August as signs of a early winter
    season will appear in the west as well.

    Tree colorations will appear earlier than normal with bright
    fall-like colors appearing in August, and increasing
    by September throughout the country ~ about six
    weeks ahead of schedule. Look for the signs of
    tree colorations in the underbrush and for signs
    of earlier leaf falling to appear in August, and
    speed up later in the month and into September.

    The coming Fall Season is going to be chillier
    than normal, with October's air cooler, and
    most people by that time noticing that early
    fall seems to have been in August/September,
    and that by October, it feels more like late
    fall. Morning temperatures by that time will
    be below freezing in regions like the New England,
    the Northeast, the Pacific Northwest. Even regions
    in the Southwest, such as Arizona, will note the
    early fall conditions.

    Despite the blistering heat that will cover most
    of North America, my astrometeorological
    outlook calls for a fall season that develops
    earlier than normal, and the coming of a cold,
    snowy, wet, and windy winter season ahead.

    The coming autumn & winter seasons reveal that
    summer 2006 will be quicker than usual, though
    with above normal temperatures, and below normal
    temperatures affecting most of the United States.
    Summer has arrived earlier than usual and will
    end early as well.

    According to my calculations, the change will
    be quite noticable by late September/early
    October, and very clear by the end of October,
    close to the weekend of return to standard
    daylight time - that winter has come.

    The end of October is stormy, wet, and cold,
    with the first snows of the season falling
    around the time of Halloween and the first
    week of November 2006. Expect chilly, wet,
    and windy conditions that will come as a surprise
    to the unprepared ~ especially the torrential
    rains of late October and November.

    In November, guard against a return of flooding events in
    the Upper Midwest, Ohio Valley, Mid-Atlantic,
    and states near the Mason-Dixon line, including
    Maryland, Washington DC, and northern VA. Torrential
    November rains, thick fogs, and colder than
    normal temperatures make for dangerous driving
    and travel conditions in the Pacific Northwest
    and California.

    Winter 2007 will arrive earlier than normal
    in most parts of the country, including New
    England, the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Upper
    Midwest, and Pacific Northwest ~
    all having stormy winter conditions, and
    below average cold temperatures, gusting
    winds, stormier precipiations of cold
    rains, snow, and ice ~ earlier than usual.

    Winter arives by November 2006, and is at
    an end by late February/early March 2007.

    **Farmers and produce workers should plan to harvest
    earlier than normal this year. Due to a sluggish
    spring, and flooding, many crops were lost during
    the Upper Midwestern, and Northeastern floods of late.
    Farmers should attempt to gather whatever harvests
    they can and to ramp up harvest collection in August
    and September to avoid major problems in October.

    Transits confirm an earlier arrival of winter, and
    a short conventional autumn season, with fall-like
    conditions cropping up in signs in Canada, and
    throughout regions of the United States, such as
    the Pacific Northwest.

    Look for cooler than normal temperatures - even
    for summer - throughout regions of the U.S.,
    and in Canada, for instance. Other signs
    are those of nature... squirrel activity
    with early burying of acorns, nuts... unusual
    shedding of tree leaves... fall-like colorations,
    in summer... Canadian geese flocks heading
    south in August...almost September-like signs in June,
    and Jul

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  2. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Deltaville,VA
    Interesting.

    Four years ago, oak trees were dropping acorns like mad. My friend said at the time that its going to be a bad winter, and that was natures way of taking care of the animals. It was a brutal winter!

    The last 2-3 years I noticed very little acorns being dropped, and the winters have been rather mild.

    This year, it looks like another bumper crop of acorns! We will see, but kinda jives with Spikes post.
  3. ourhouse

    ourhouse Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2006
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    727
    Loc:
    Norfolk Ma
    Looks like I better hit the wood pile and kick out 2or3 cord.
  4. PAJerry

    PAJerry Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    224
    Loc:
    Waterford, PA
    My Grandparents always went by the crop of Beech nuts - heavy crop=bad winter. The trees along the creek are LOADED this year, more than I have ever seen in the 29 years we have lived here. The first winter we were here set a record - 180 inches of snow- and we spent most of our time shoveling the driveway out. Got a big snowblower now, thank goodness. Oak trees in the front yard are also loaded and dropping lots of acorns now. I guess we will see if these predictors are right. Breezeway is full loaded with wood and there is another 2 cords just beside the garage so bring it on!
  5. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Messages:
    2,248
    Loc:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    Sorry to bust the bubble here. Last year was the most acorns I've ever seen. Last year was so mild a winter, the skating rink I built in the front yard never froze enough to skate on. But the acorns from the red oak in the yard were 3" deep in a hollow section of the yard near the tree. We had turkeys and squirrels just stuffing themselves.

    This year, almost no acorns.

    So, what to conclude from one tree?

    But the theory does seem reasonable.
  6. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Lake Wissota
    I get a real kick out of these long range predictions. The Farmers Almanac is also predicting a cold winter. They got a 50/50 chance and when they are right they gloat in their glory, but when they are wrong you don't here a thing. Nobody can accurately forecast that far ahead. What happened to all those hurricanes we were suppose to get this year? Last year they predicted an average season and we got pummeled. This year they predict above average season and were below. It's a crap shoot as far as I am concerned, and you can't go by acorns, moon phases, or any other crap. it's best to be prepared for anything.
  7. Michael6268

    Michael6268 Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
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    Messages:
    424
    Loc:
    Grafton NH/Upper Valley
    Yeah and the Farmers Almanac also states the if El Nino doesnt form, it could be a VERY mild winter. Looks like the covered their butts everywhich way!
  8. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I saw a university study last year where the kids took the Farmer's Almanac and historical records and compared them. The Almanac missed the crap out of a huge majority of their forecasts.

    I saw the guy that does the five year forecasts for the government on TV a few years ago. They asked him if he published his predictions. His reply "Put it in writing? Are you nuts?"

    But I have to give virtually all of the weather guys credit in the week to two week range these days. When they say something is coming next week it ususally does. I remember not too long ago when they were wrong about tomorrow.
  9. michaelthomas

    michaelthomas New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2006
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    Last year I raked up 6 or 7 wheelbarrows full of acorns out of my front yard and the winter was very mild. If I get twice the acorns this year those oak trees are going to be turned into firewood!
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