1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Worried about firing temps from Napolen 1402

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by shorenetworks, Dec 10, 2012.

  1. shorenetworks

    shorenetworks New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    So last night I had a chance to do a full load on the 1402 and saw a max temp on the top of the stove of 710 !!!! with a fluke IR. Even with fully closing the air control I was still seeing temps in the 630-640 range.

    My question is two fold,
    1. did the 710 temp with a loud bang permantly damage my one week old stove?
    2. anyone have an idea what i ought to be running at? since i have an insert I cant get to the pipe.

    Thank you in advance

    Chris

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. blwncrewchief

    blwncrewchief Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Messages:
    166
    Loc:
    Northern, IN
    710 on a steel stove/insert should not damage your stove if that was the actual top temp. Welcome to the burning world.;lol

    If you can get a good reading with your IR 500-650 should be a good range. I usually try to get a peak of 600 on a full load and settled down to about 550 for the long haul with a full load. When you get to a "full load" these peak a little bit and usually settle down. Every stove is a little different so you will have to get the feel for yours. For example with mine when I get close to a "full load" (I would say this is when I am getting within 3-4" of the secondaries) I have to get a hold of it as soon as the secondaries fire or it "takes off". Now "takes off" is not an over fire, but gets a little scary the first few times,it goes to 700 or so if I don't catch it quick. The only real problem with this is it ends up 90 in the house and I just lost 30% of my burn time on that load. If I'm not going by my probe in the flue then it is by sight. Take note where this starts to happen when you start loading close to the top. Normally an actual full load will be that 3-4" down from the secondaries and as you start to get closer than that your stove will take on a whole new personality.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    47,480
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    The stove is probably fine. Napoleons are eager burners. Try cutting the air back more aggressively with the next fire.
  4. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    7,057
    Loc:
    N.E. Penna
    To add to what was already said, the amount of hot coals you have left in the stove when doing your reload can greatly change how that load of fuel burns.

    If you load too soon, on large hot coals spread out over the bottom of the stove, you run the risk of the entire load lighting off at once, and things going too hot.

    If you wait till the coals have diminished more (you can speed this along by raking them towards the front of the stove and opening the air wide open a 1/2 hour or more before you want to reload) you can help keep things better under control.

    It's hard to measure actual temps on an insert, and appreciate how cognizant you are in that regard. That said, it's unlikely you did damage but consider how the fire reacted up until the point where your pants filled up, and look for the signs next time and you should be set.

    Also, how hard were you running the blower. If things get rocking too much, throw that blower up on MAX to get as much heat wicked out of that insert as you can.

    pen
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    28,201
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Nobody ever listens to me, but if you hear loud bangs heating up a steel stove then make sure it is sitting level. They are made level in a jig and the stress of sitting torqued will cause the banging noise. Ticking sounds are normal. Banging sounds mean it is trying to tell ya something.
    wkpoor likes this.
  6. ditchrider

    ditchrider Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    190
    Loc:
    North central, CO
    +1
  7. Pierre902

    Pierre902 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2009
    Messages:
    44
    Loc:
    Western MA
    I am by no means an expert, but can tell you first hand my experience so far with the 1402. Since I've had mine I've reached stove top temps of 750 to 800 a couple of times .This was primarily due to loading over hot coals with the air intake open too much. My wood is also good and seasoned. Like you, this happened over the first couple weeks. I've learned to not load up fully over hot coals and leave the air intake in a near closed position in this situation. From a cold start, I usually get the temps up to 400 and gradually begin to close the air intake over a 15-30 minute time frame. I regularly get temps up to 600 and then see them settle down to between 400 and 500 for an overnight burn. I think as you burn the stove more you learn what It likes and doesn't like. I defer to some of the experts on the bang sound. I have heard ticking and the occasional clank with the steal heating up and consider this normal. Good luck with the stove, before you know it you will have it dialed in.
  8. HeatsTwice

    HeatsTwice Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2008
    Messages:
    537
    Loc:
    Santa Rosa, California
    Elsewhere on this site are many mensions of the effects of the stove fan on stove performance. Yes the Napoleon is an eager burner and I too have come back to a 700 degree stove after leaving the air intake lever open during stove start up. I can say that running the stove fan after closing the lever, does cool off a stove which has gone nuclear.
  9. Jacklake2003

    Jacklake2003 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    Woodstock, GA
    begreen likes this.
  10. blwncrewchief

    blwncrewchief Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    Messages:
    166
    Loc:
    Northern, IN
    Mine bangs occasionally and is very level. However you are absolutely correct on the telling me something. It's yelling "hey dumb, dumb. You did something wrong." As it only bangs when it is either in an extreme warm up, such as I didn't catch it quick enough. Or, it stalled causing it to cool quickly. In proper operation it just barely ticks a little. I can almost run the stove blind just by the sound. It gets me once in a while in bed, I here a mild bang and think "damn it I shut the air down too far". Get up, check the stove, and sure enough, it stalled. I still haven't figured out why it is that the finicky load usually only happens at night, when I am late loading the stove before bed.
  11. HatCityIAFF

    HatCityIAFF Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2011
    Messages:
    135
    Loc:
    Western CT
    i usually get my thermometer to read 550ish, then close it. it'll climb to 600, then settle in around 500 for the night. My stove likes to be brought up to 550, then shut off down to 1/4 open all at once for the night. secondaries will be going good, then after a hour or two the secondaries will quit and the logs will burn. then i'll get heat from the coals burning off. Mind you when i bring it up to 550, its around 650. This is because of the double steel on top, and the blower cooling off the thermometer.
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    47,480
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA

Share This Page