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Yukon Big Jack barometric damper setting

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by johnsopi, Feb 26, 2009.

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  1. johnsopi

    johnsopi Minister of Fire

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    MD near DE&PA;
    I have a big Jack wood furnace that has a barometric damper on it. Have been running it four years.
    I set the barometric damper by guessing what it should be. I don't have a manometer and if I did the
    setting would all ways change because creosote builds up on the flap, because the air cool the smoke.
    I've thought of not using the damper but it was designed using the damper.

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  2. mike1234

    mike1234 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
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    Loc:
    Colorado
    Not much info to go on. Pipe runs straight up? double wall? how tall?

    A couple of ideas. Buy a manometer from Yukon for 58.00. Your settings won't change (much anyway) based on some build up on flap.
    Make sure your baro is set up for horizontal or vertical run of pipe, vertical on right and horizontal on left (if you bought the same stuff I did from yukon).
    If you are guessing and you shouldn't, put the weight almost as far back as possible, then just move it out 1/8 or so inch.

    When you say creosote build up, you mean the runny black tar stuff or just some fluffy ash stuff. The runny stuff is from green wood, the other stuff is from cool burning. I'm guessing you have the fluffy stuff that I deal with also.
    (I think fluffy stuff is actually the technical term :) )
    I can burn the fluffy ash stuff off by hitting 900 or 1000 in the stovepipe once a week or so (very cool to watch that stuff glow and burn off), and keep it way down by hitting 600 or 700 once or twice daily, for sure first thing in morning to burn off overnight idling stuff.

    Burn very small fires when it's warm, burn them hot and then let them go out.

    I tired bypassing the damper, just put foil over it. It burns a lot more wood. I also think that we have very little chance of the runaway fire that you read a lot about on this forum the way the furnace is set up, but if you bypass the baro, on a very windy day with the right conditions, you could really overfire the whole set up.

    That's my $0.02 worth, hope it helps.

  3. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith New Member

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    Loc:
    Northern Mn.
    I should add that if you can get long enough burn times without it ....run it that way.

    Creosote builds in only a few ways.
    Wet wood,lack of make up air,cool flues or poor drafting flue which make up air can be the culprit or building too big of loads on milder days when your furnace is not being asked to make too much heat very often by your thermostat.
    Here's a secret....I run my BJ90 without the BDR.
    sure I may go through a bit more wood ,but who cares....as long as I can load in the a.m. and p.m. only it's all good in my world.

    I need to add this is only on the Jacks...all Eagle furnaces are UL listed to have the BDR in play.
  4. mike1234

    mike1234 New Member

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    Loc:
    Colorado
    Bumped this thread rather than start a new one.
    I recently bought a infrared laser thermometer, and have been playing with it when it's cold enough to have fires. Something I have noted is that when I open the barometric damper and temp the stovepipe behind it, the temp is at least 100 degrees higher than the temp I am getting from the inserted thermometer that is 24" above the baro. I actually tested the insert thermometer in the oven, and it seems basically right (maybe 10 or 15 cool).
    So for example, furnace running at 450 (temp of steal right above the door), stove pipe thermometer 300, but open the baro and temp it, 450 if you temp downward toward stove, and 400 if I temp up the stovepipe.
    My conclusion (might be obvious to the rest of you) is that the Baro really, really cools the stovepipe (to the tune of more than 100 degrees in 2 ft). I can set the baro so this is not so pronounced, but then I lower my burn times.
    What I think this teaches me is: 1. Jam the Baro shut once a week (while I am standing at the furnace) and burn the stovepipe to 600 - 800 degrees, by the insert thermometer readings. 2. Clean the stovepipe once every 2 months, pay a lot of attention to the higher parts of it.
    What do you all think, make sense to you?

    Baro set to .03 btw in case you were wondering, and .03 is about 3/4 the way out on the weight on the baro.
  5. CrappieKeith

    CrappieKeith New Member

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    It sounds like you have decent stack temps.and your getting ok burn times Mike.
    Make sure your wood is well seasoned and your doing about all you can do.
    Make sure you have enough blower and supply...ie return so the stat gets satisfied quick enough.
  6. taxidermist

    taxidermist Minister of Fire

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    Fowlerville MI
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