Englander 25-PDVC low heat output woes

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heat seeker

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2011
3,214
Northern CT
I believe that the OP was talking about his blower fan in number 22. Mine, at least, has windings that I blow out every year, and get a noticeable amount of dust out of. That goes for the combustion and room blowers on my stove. The auger motors, I agree, haven't windings like that.
 

Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
I believe that the OP was talking about his blower fan in number 22. Mine, at least, has windings that I blow out every year, and get a noticeable amount of dust out of. That goes for the combustion and room blowers on my stove. The auger motors, I agree, haven't windings like that.

That's correct, I was speaking about the blower fan. Since I posted that, I've not been able to duplicate that issue again. The output of the blower fan is strong, and raises with the blower speed setting.
 

Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
That's correct, I was speaking about the blower fan. Since I posted that, I've not been able to duplicate that issue again. The output of the blower fan is strong, and raises with the blower speed setting.
Of course I post this, go to check on the stove, and the blower fan's off. Sit and watch the stove a minute or two and the fan comes back on. The fan doesn't sound strained when it comes on, though. The volume of air seems correct, it's just that the temperature of the air is just above ambient temp of the room.
 

Ssyko

Minister of Fire
Nov 6, 2017
4,204
Lorraine NY
That is the thermister it actually is the proof of fire and an overtemp sensor all in one. If it had a bad connection at either end it can affect the the operation of the convection blower. Give the stove mount a good cleaning with a wire brush and see ifit helps
 
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Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
That is the thermister it actually is the proof of fire and an overtemp sensor all in one. If it had a bad connection at either end it can affect the the operation of the convection blower. Give the stove mount a good cleaning with a wire brush and see ifit helps

Is the thermister bolted to the stove body underneath the room blower?
 

Ssyko

Minister of Fire
Nov 6, 2017
4,204
Lorraine NY
Actually, there are no windings in a shaded pole motor other than the heavy gauge windings on the field laminations. The armature is a solid segmented part with no windings on it at all. I'd say the bearings are dry. Shaded pole motors have very little starting torque and depend on the centrifugal force of the spinning armature to provide movement. If the bearings are dry, the motor won't reliably start. Certainly don't hurt to blow them out however. Every component inside collects dust and debris no matter what. They all live in an adverse enviroment.

Incorrect EVERY electrical motor has windings. The magnetic field from the coil drives the Motor.
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Incorrect EVERY electrical motor has windings. The magnetic field from the coil drives the Motor.
I'll give you that but the armature has no windings. It's a solid but segmented part. the skewed segments are what causes it to rotate.

I'll take a partially correct but you knew what I meant.... :p
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Never dissected one so I'll take your word for that. Starting torque on a shaded pole motor is about non existent anyway.

They usually fail when the outboard bearing gets so sloppy that it allows the armature to contact the laminations. They they just hum and get warm.
 

Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
Tightening the thermister mounting bolt did not fix my heat output issue. Didn't have any issues with the room blower afterwards, however. Also seems to have helped with the start up process, I'd been getting E-2 codes just about every time I started the stove. That hasn't happened since I've tightened the thermister.
 

Ssyko

Minister of Fire
Nov 6, 2017
4,204
Lorraine NY
OK on the back of your control board the bottom rt side there should be a thermostat connection. is the jumper wire still in it?
SAM_1743.JPG
 

Ssyko

Minister of Fire
Nov 6, 2017
4,204
Lorraine NY
Well Ben I honestly don’t know anymore that could be wrong, other than the heat exchanger being coated With creosote and is insulating it. Can you get a big fire going in it to try and burn it out?
 
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Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
I burned it for about 5 hours yesterday on 9, after I sprayed the inside of the exchanger with creosote remover. Although I don't see any notable build up with a little inspection mirror, I bought a USB inspection camera with a light off of Amazon. That should be here Friday, hoping that helps in seeing what's going on in there.

One thing I hadn't confirmed after I reset the control board was that the bottom three buttons were set to 6-4-1. Found the low fuel feed was set to 5 instead of 6. Have the stove starting up now, fingers are crossed.
 
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Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
Based off my low fuel feed setting revelation, I checked the heat mode setting. It was set to "A". I set it to "D". I'd assumed a factory board reset would put the settings to the factory recommended for the stove.
 

Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
It's through the start up cycle, the hopper is filled, I'm going to bed. Going to let is run at 5/5 heat/blower and see how it makes out overnight. I'll be up in 6 hours for work. One thing that's odd, since I changed the heat mode to "D", I can change the heat and blower settings independently of one another again. My first thread in this forum was wondering why the blower speed and heat settings raised with one another after I reset the board.
 

Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
Still had lukewarm air from the stove this morning.

I received the gaskets I'd ordered for the combustion blower yesterday. The room blower gasket I'd ordered also came in, but it looks like it is for between the room blower motor and it's housing. Is there a separate, square shaped gasket for in between the room blower and the back of the stove?
 

ericofmaine

Burning Hunk
Feb 8, 2012
196
Southern Maine
Unless you really tear up the gasket for the room air blower, you won't need to replace it. I've had mine on and off for 12+ years, still on the original gasket.

Eric
 

Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
Well Ben I honestly don’t know anymore that could be wrong, other than the heat exchanger being coated With creosote and is insulating it. Can you get a big fire going in it to try and burn it out?

I bought some flexible clear hose from Home Depot. I'm going to attach it to my shop vac and snake it down the heat exchanger to try and vacuum it out better. In the heat exchanger diagram, the red represents the heat exchanger, which is a separate passageway that snakes behind the baffle plate, correct? Meaning, the hot air from the stove heats the air inside the exchanger, but the two air sources don't mix together?
 

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Ssyko

Minister of Fire
Nov 6, 2017
4,204
Lorraine NY
The hot exhaust gasses go up. And through the opening in the impingement plate and then the opening you are planning to clean. In that opening is the heat exchanger as it gets hot (both sides) the gases then go into the combustion blower through to the vent pipe. Now the opposite side of the heat exchanger is in the path for the convection blower it blows air through and over the exchanger and out the front of the stove. The exhaust and convection air never meet. After a leaf blower and mallet cleaning I would not expect to see much, but im crossing my fingers thers something.
 

Ben in Maryland

New Member
Feb 3, 2021
44
Manchester, Maryland
Tonight I removed the combustion blower motor and the convection motor to clean the motors. Nothing too bad in either. Using the clear tubing taped into the shop vac hose, I cleaned the combustion blower housing and up into the vent pipe from the backside. Nothing appreciable came out. Snaked the hose into both sides of the clean out port as well as down through the opening in the upper left side of the baffle plate. Some ash, but nothing I was surprised about considering I'd used the stove for a few hours since I did the leaf blower cleaning. Brushed any interior surface of the stove I could reach with a wire brush and vacuumed the stove out again. Then I sprayed down inside the clean out port and down into the upper left side of the baffle plate with the creosote cleaner. After I plugged the stove back in I confirmed proper board settings, 6-4-1 across the bottom and heat mode D. Turned on the stove and it fired on the first try, I'm now running it at a 5 heat setting and 1 blower speed setting to get the creosote remover working.
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Are you absolutely sure you don't have a mouse house in the venting somewhere?