Englander stove was running to hot; too much fuel

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jsief

New Member
Nov 8, 2021
4
ny
First timer here. Thought I would relay my experience since I did not see a similar problem posted. This is my 4th winter using a purchased used 25-PDVC. Nominally 1.3 40# bags per day. This season it seemed to be running very hot and using a lot of pellets about a week in. No adjustment of LFF, LBA or AOT seemed to make a difference. Checked the mode, D, as it should be. Closed the restrictive plate in the botttom of the hopper, played and played with it. I could see the upper auger was running for 10 secs and off for 5. I knew this was way too much. Diagnostic mode was good except for no upper auger movement. That coupled with too much feed prompted me to conclude the CB (original?) was bad. A new board had no effect. After playing with it for more than a week I happened to put a test light on the upper auger leads so that I could see what it was doing while I played with the CB settings. This is when I noticed it was powered (by a heat setting of 1) for less than a second, but was turning for 10 secs (and stopped for 5)! The motor was a year old or so. Apparently, the gearbox friction became so low that the motor and auger 'coasted' for 9 secs pushing pellets. I had a spare motor to try and found it would 'coast' for about 3 secs (uninstalled) with about the same (less than one second) amount of power. Sorry, for my post length. Hoping that someone else might see this as helpful down the road. :) - Jim
 

FlyFish'n

New Member
Oct 23, 2021
62
OH
Is the power/control to that auger motor straight DC or is it a stepper/servo motor? I would imagine it would be a stepper/servo motor, but the issue you describe with it "coasting" doesn't stack up.

If it is straight DC - you may try using a relay to control the power instead, so there is a disconnect between the power & motor. When the relay is off (and motor should be off) use the NO (normally open) position of the relay to switch the motor leads to a resistor, or short. This will add electrical load to the motor and slow it down faster. If low resistance gives marginal results, try shorting. However, a resistor will be safest to try first. Maybe a 100 ohm to start, and work lower from there.

Edit - on 2nd thought - see if there is a capacitor that is part of the motor power. If there is - the capacitor could be the issue. A capacitor will store electricity. As power is supplied it will hold on to it. Then when power is removed it will release its stored electricity back in to the circuit until it is discharged.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Switch your auger drive to one with reduced RPM.
 

jsief

New Member
Nov 8, 2021
4
ny
Is the power/control to that auger motor straight DC or is it a stepper/servo motor? I would imagine it would be a stepper/servo motor, but the issue you describe with it "coasting" doesn't stack up.

If it is straight DC - you may try using a relay to control the power instead, so there is a disconnect between the power & motor. When the relay is off (and motor should be off) use the NO (normally open) position of the relay to switch the motor leads to a resistor, or short. This will add electrical load to the motor and slow it down faster. If low resistance gives marginal results, try shorting. However, a resistor will be safest to try first. Maybe a 100 ohm to start, and work lower from there.

Edit - on 2nd thought - see if there is a capacitor that is part of the motor power. If there is - the capacitor could be the issue. A capacitor will store electricity. As power is supplied it will hold on to it. Then when power is removed it will release its stored electricity back in to the circuit until it is discharged.
Not DC, but 120V AC. Not a steeper or servo, direct 1 RPM output from the gearbox. It did 'coast'. Replaced with motor that did not 'coast'. Problem solved. I respectfully stay with my original assessment.
 

ericofmaine

Burning Hunk
Feb 8, 2012
226
Southern Maine
These are straight AC motors.

Eric
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
These are straight AC motors.

Eric
So tell me your definition of a 'straight ac motor in a stove, I'm curious. You change the reduction gearset to change the output rpm. All the shaded pole motors spin at the same rpm, I believe 3600 rpm.
 

jsief

New Member
Nov 8, 2021
4
ny
So tell me your definition of a 'straight ac motor in a stove, I'm curious. You change the reduction gearset to change the output rpm. All the shaded pole motors spin at the same rpm, I believe 3600 rpm.
The gearbox is integrated with the motor housing so there is no opportunity to change the gearing. The AC powers the motor directly without relays, capacitors, etc. Whatever the brushless motor RPM is, it is geared down significantly to produce 1 RPM.
 

augiedoggy

New Member
Dec 23, 2021
6
Western NY
Hope this helps, a little late I know but you can adjust auger run times with the control panel.


also you can get different rpm motors which will add more or less in the same time frame.
 
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