Everything Drolet Tundra - Heatmax...

brenndatomu Posted By brenndatomu, Feb 8, 2015 at 9:42 PM

  1. DoubleB

    DoubleB
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 4, 2014
    600
    218
    Loc:
    NE Wisconsin
    Single wall or double wall? I have a single wall pipe connector between my furnace and chimney, and I collect a bunch of soot in there, but not as much in the chimney that stays warmer like a double-wall would do.
     
  2. Darbycrash

    Darbycrash
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 28, 2014
    41
    9
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Single Wall. I guess it is a common thing with gassers to make a lot of soot. SO the internet says....
     
  3. DoubleB

    DoubleB
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 4, 2014
    600
    218
    Loc:
    NE Wisconsin
    I don't know whether there's a connection between gassers and soot. I'd be more suspect of the single-wall stove pipe. The pipe wall is cooled quite well by the room so it's a good magnet for whatever smoke didn't get burned. The whole point of the gasser is to burn the smoke, which is more than non-gassers do.
     
  4. jimlop

    jimlop
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 6, 2017
    6
    0
    Loc:
    stlouis
    Wood burning can create soot, creosote, bottom ash, and fly ash as some of the physical byproducts that we must contend with. Fly ash as the name implies is very light and I believe not combustible. Would think there is always fly ash making it's way out our chimneys. Would guess you see accumulation at a tee area because of the turbulence created by the tee intrrupting the smooth flow of smoke and fly ash up the flue.
     
  5. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2013
    2,600
    689
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
  6. DoubleB

    DoubleB
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 4, 2014
    600
    218
    Loc:
    NE Wisconsin
    Yea, an automated modulating damper sounds great. However, just admit that you wouldn't stop there. Next would be an O2 sensor feedback loop to control the primary to secondary air ratio to burn as cleanly as possible. At least that's on my wish list that just ain't gonna happen in the foreseeable future. ;)
     
    brenndatomu likes this.
  7. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2013
    2,600
    689
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
    Well, yeah! :p ;lol
     
    DoubleB likes this.
  8. jimlop

    jimlop
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 6, 2017
    6
    0
    Loc:
    stlouis
    When members talk about using a finishing nail to keep draft door from closing completely where/how is a nail positioned
     
  9. DoubleB

    DoubleB
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 4, 2014
    600
    218
    Loc:
    NE Wisconsin
    I don't know, there's not a notch to wedge a nail in that I'm aware of.

    I don't have a pic of mine, but I took a thin strip (1/4" wide) of sheet metal, bent it in half so the crotch could hold it in place, and slipped it in place over the edge of the middle air inlet so that the flap is just a smidge above flush.

    For mine, even a finishing nail would have let way too much air in. I'm leery enough of getting the heat out of the Tundra in a power outage, I didn't want too much extra air making it that much worse. The first try of the sheet metal, it had a slight twist to it so it kept the flap open more than I wanted. I flattened it out so that it keeps the flap open just a paper-thin amount, and that was plenty of a help but not too much.
     
  10. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2013
    2,600
    689
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
    Same here. I used a 1/4" wide piece of scrap left over from doing duct work. I bent it so it clips onto the lower corner of the flap and has a tab sticking out to use as a handle to make it easier to install/remove. For my application I only need to use it when it is warm out...say 35* or warmer, and no wind. Having a manometer on the wall hooked up full time is very valuable for this very reason (among others) (which I still have some NOS Dwyers available if anybody is interested)
     
  11. sloeffle

    sloeffle
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 1, 2012
    323
    42
    Loc:
    Morrow County, Ohio
    I don't have all of the metal working tools that some of these guys have so I improvise with what I have. ;)

    I put the nail where the damper bends down at the bottom.The weight of the damper holds the nail in place.
     
  12. Wood1Dennis

    Wood1Dennis
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2016
    25
    12
    Loc:
    Eastern Wisconsin
    Like he said.

    I use a sheet metal screw but same thing. Really I only use it when kindling a fire and I need to get a bunch of air in there to get it rolling. Set the screw up closer to the hinge to hold the damper open more. Move it down toward the bottom when she gets going so the damper is partially closed. I remove it all together when it is ready to be left alone. That is when my adjustable damper takes over and I fine tune it to what I need for heat output!
     
  13. Darbycrash

    Darbycrash
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jun 28, 2014
    41
    9
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Well the warmer weather has arrived and I must say I do not regret my purchase at all. The furnace heated my house with no issues since January.

    I will however, say, that when the weather gets to this tricky 50-60 degrees in the day and 30 somethings at night, heating with wood can be tricky. And heating with this furnace has proven to be a little extra tricky.

    My biggest issue arises when the house is say, 66 degrees. I throw a few pieces of ash into the fire box, set the thermostat to 72 and walk away. House heats right up (since it is about 40 degrees outside) fairly quickly. The house holds 72 no problem, all day. Now its time to go to bed, and I want to keep the fire going because the temp will drop at night and we have some youngsters in the house. The temp is around 69-70 degrees when I add just a few more pieces of white ash. The temp goes up to the set point, 72 degrees. T-stat closes the damper, while the wood is still gassing and has not yet gotten to the "down slope" side of the burning curve. The wood is spewing large amounts of hydrogen/carbon monoxide/methane which is in return mixing with the heat and small amounts of O2 being let into the firebox. Once the O2 gets to a high enough level a small explosion happens, enough to pressurize (puff) the system. Ok, this would be fine normally, however, every single joint in the flue pipe leaks smoke into the house and stinks the place up. Not to mention the C0 threat. Really annoying if you ask me.

    How are you guys dealing with the warmer weather??
     
  14. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2013
    2,600
    689
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
    This is known as a backpuff. Its kinda surprising we don't have more problems with it than we do on Tundra (and Caddys). Its caused by a number of different things, but in your case I'd say its mainly just closing the damper too fast starving the fire for air. Once the oxygen levels catch up, then POOF! That was a real issue with the modded firebox on my Yukon Husky furnace...part of the reason I decided to try the Tundra.
    The guys with EPA wood stoves deal with this issue by closing the damper slowly...real slowly...like cut it back 25%, wait 5 minutes, cut it back 25%, wait 5 minutes, and so on.
    I don't deal with this much in warmer weather because I switch to heating with the insert stove in the fireplace when temps come up.
    But I have found if I load onto a large bed of hot coals the same thing can happen. So what I do if I suspect the backpuff is a possibility, is to clip a paper clip on the side of the damper so it cant close the whole way. Sometimes I will slide it up near the pivot point (on the side) so it holds the damper open quite a bit. Then as the fire stabilizes in a couple minutes I will slide the clip down in a couple increments until it can be removed (unless you need to leave it on for a bit more air (draft) during warm weather) This should only take a few extra minutes when loading and will save a lot of frustration. Just make SURE you do not leave the furnace area with damper propped open (much) if you get a call or the kids are screaming bloody murder upstairs, pull the paper clip off before you run off! Better a backpuff than a fire...
    Do you have a manometer mounted permanent? It could be your draft stalling out too...but the paper clip trick should help with that issue too.
     
  15. Wood1Dennis

    Wood1Dennis
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2016
    25
    12
    Loc:
    Eastern Wisconsin
    Although I don't really have a back drafting problem with my set-up, I will get a smoky smoldering fire if I don't feed it enough O2 when the damper closes too soon.

    I find that I have to let the house cool down enough so that the demand for heat is high enough that I can get a decent fire going before the damper closes. Ironically I have been setting the damper more open. I put less wood in the firebox. In the winter I would load it full, but set the damper just slightly open so that it will hold the fire longer. In all cases I prop the damper open when kindling a new fire from scratch or from coals. I let the servo control take over from there.

    I think the key is to build a good hot fire with enough fuel appropriate to the weather / heat demand. It is a bit of an educated guess, but I am getting better at it with experience.
     
    DoubleB and brenndatomu like this.
  16. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2013
    2,600
    689
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
    Heating with wood is definitely an acquired skill...practice practice practice! ==c
     
  17. DoubleB

    DoubleB
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 4, 2014
    600
    218
    Loc:
    NE Wisconsin
    I usually burn a full load (more than 3/4 full) with the damper closed once up to temp. Sometimes, I'll burn a small load (less than 1/4 firebox) with the damper open the whole burn. I'll do this if I need a little extra heat, like now with warm weather, or it's 7pm and really cold and I want to get a little extra heat before the overnight load at 9pm.

    I just haven't had good success trying to burn a ~1/2 full firebox. Too hot with the damper open, but not quite enough critical mass to sustain secondaries well.
     
  18. Builderml

    Builderml
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Sep 13, 2015
    195
    65
    Loc:
    Ct
    When outside temps are over 50 or so and I want to take the chill out of the house what I usually do is make a small fire 3-4 splits and just let it run wide open . May not be the best way but it gets the job done and I have not had any of the stove farts that you speak of.
     
    brenndatomu likes this.
  19. Woodworm21

    Woodworm21
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 23, 2017
    4
    4
    Loc:
    Canada
    Great forum, just picked up a new Tundra 2. Just curious as to the purpose of the digital screen and + - buttons on the back of the damper motor housing. When I asked Drolet they said this was used to set the circuit board at assembly. I'm assuming it's sets the upper and lower limits. My main concern is if someone where to touch these by mistake or while cleaning the unit etc, will it mess up my furnace settings.
     
  20. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2013
    2,600
    689
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
    Welcome @Woodworm21 Congrats on the new T2! I don't think we have too many people on here with these units yet...maybe a couple...kinda new yet. I personally don't have any knowledge of the screen you mention...maybe someone else will know.
    Maybe the larger Heatpro is the same? I think there are a few more of those around already.
    My gut feeling is that you would need a code to make changes to the settings.
    Have any pics of your setup?
     
  21. Woodworm21

    Woodworm21
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 23, 2017
    4
    4
    Loc:
    Canada
    Thanks. No pics yet, I just rough installed the unit and flue pipe today. No duct work connected to the plenum yet. Fired it up to burn off the paint fumes etc. Another question: I plan on connecting the furnace to a thermostat. Right now in manual mode the damper/air inlet door is either completely open or completely closed (2 setting rocker switch). Is this the same with the thermostat or will the damper opening vary depending on need?
     
  22. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 21, 2013
    2,600
    689
    Loc:
    NE Ohio
    Boy, I wish.
    No, it will be totally open when Tstat is calling for heat, then closed when not.
     
  23. DoubleB

    DoubleB
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 4, 2014
    600
    218
    Loc:
    NE Wisconsin
    Welcome, @Woodworm21 !
    I think I've only seen one other person on here say they had a T2, and I don't recall much discussion about it, so you might have just volunteered yourself to be the guinea pig to tell us all about the TundraII. :)

    What does the owner's manual say about the LCD screen and +/- buttons? If they are accessible from the outside, I'd assume they are operational in regular use and that the owner's manual would say something about it. Can you tell how many digits the LCD screen can display?

    If I recall correctly, the TundraII was going to have a circuit board similar or the same as the Heatpro, and that the circuit board controlled which of 4 speeds the blower was at, based upon plenum temperature. So I imagine any of those functions may be displayed and/or adjustable from the LCD and buttons.

    No sense in me speculating much more, I'm sure many answers are in the owners manual, which I don't have time to peruse right now.

    Welcome aboard.
     
  24. Highbeam

    Highbeam
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 28, 2006
    13,477
    2,512
    Loc:
    Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
    I don't own one but as I understand these furnaces is that the completely closed setting is actually still open a good bit to allow a minimum clean burning stove. Some people's furnaces just sit on this setting all the time. Then when you call for heat with the stat or the rocker the intake goes wide open until the stat is satisfied OR the furnace thinks it is getting too hot and then it will automatically close the damper until the furnace cools enough to safely reopen the damper. In addition, the fans run whenever the stove thinks it is hot enough.

    Can't wait to see some install pictures.

    Some furnaces can more accurately meter intake air but they are several times more expensive.
     
  25. Woodworm21

    Woodworm21
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 23, 2017
    4
    4
    Loc:
    Canada
    Still installing the T2 ductwork. Looking forward to having everything complete. I'm reading in this forum that some guys are bending a piece of scrap flashing/duct and slipping it over the air inlet door so that it jars open just a tad even when closed. I'll wait and try the unit as is first but when I gave it a test run, the minute I closed the air damper the fire died down immediately. But again this was only a very small fire with a few dry splits. I will try again with a larger, long burning fire when I have it all sat up.
     
    brenndatomu likes this.

Share This Page