Harman p68 using excessive amount of pellets

Shoe0402

Member
Dec 15, 2015
42
Pennsylvania
Hi guys o got a harman p68 last year from my brother in law that is in our unfinished basement. It was using a full bag of pellets in 10-14 hours in manual mode. Is there any way to get this to use less it has our basement at probably 70 degrees and this was the lowest setting. Any help would be great. Thanks
 

SciGuy

Member
Aug 17, 2007
109
Constableville, NY
If by manual you mean stove mode, you ought to be able to cut pellet use back by using thermostat mode an setting to a lower temperature. The stove will then cycle on and off as needed to maintain the set temperature.

Hope that helps.

Hugh3
 

Overfireinthehole

Minister of Fire
May 5, 2017
612
Miller MO
If you mean you have the igniter on manual, turn it to auto and run it on room temperature and it will use less
 

jackman

Feeling the Heat
Jan 15, 2013
496
Oregon
Is it cold where you are?
 
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mr meener

Member
Aug 11, 2017
31
NY, USA
Hi guys o got a harman p68 last year from my brother in law that is in our unfinished basement. It was using a full bag of pellets in 10-14 hours in manual mode. Is there any way to get this to use less it has our basement at probably 70 degrees and this was the lowest setting. Any help would be great. Thanks
well at least you are giving an accurate count of how many pellets you burn and that is about right especially at 70 degrees. I have read many posts of guys with that stove say they use a bag a day set on around 70. wishful thinking
 
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Tonyray

Minister of Fire
My 1920's house is poorly insulated and i will use bag/half a day burning 24/7 at 72 degrees. Feed rate #3. Low fan setting which is Key to consumption or at least a major factor or i would burn more. High fan setting burns pellets faster.
 
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Shoe0402

Member
Dec 15, 2015
42
Pennsylvania
Yeah I’m going to hook it up to the thermostat wire that came with the stove and try that we have a stove upstairs and England’s and that uses at most a bag a day. Maybe a little more in really cold days. I live in northeastern pa so our winters aren’t that bad anymore. It keeps our house very warm so maybe using the thermostat mode will help reduce pellet consumption. Using as many as it uses it isn’t worth us running it it cost more than oil to use. So I’ll try that and see what it does if not I’ll sell it and buy something else lol.
 

Tonyray

Minister of Fire
Yeah I’m going to hook it up to the thermostat wire that came with the stove and try that we have a stove upstairs and England’s and that uses at most a bag a day. Maybe a little more in really cold days. I live in northeastern pa so our winters aren’t that bad anymore. It keeps our house very warm so maybe using the thermostat mode will help reduce pellet consumption. Using as many as it uses it isn’t worth us running it it cost more than oil to use. So I’ll try that and see what it does if not I’ll sell it and buy something else lol.
Sorry but I meant to say bag and 1/2 in the extreme cold weather. The teens and below
 

mr meener

Member
Aug 11, 2017
31
NY, USA
My 1920's house is poorly insulated and i will use bag/half a day burning 24/7 at 72 degrees. Feed rate #3. Low fan setting which is Key to consumption or at least a major factor or i would burn more. High fan setting burns pellets faster.
do not understand how fan setting can determine pellet usage. feed rate and thermostat setting to me is what determines pellet usage. in fact the higher the fan the cooler the air that comes out. a high fan setting actually cools the stove. I have a magnetic temp gauge and from low fan to high fan is almost 100 degrees
 

Tonyray

Minister of Fire
do not understand how fan setting can determine pellet usage. feed rate and thermostat setting to me is what determines pellet usage. in fact the higher the fan the cooler the air that comes out. a high fan setting actually cools the stove. I have a magnetic temp gauge and from low fan to high fan is almost 100 degrees
Correct. The higher the fan speed the cooler the air comes out. On my harman i have a thermostat Probe that picks up the temperature of the room which I have set at a certain temperature. If the probe picks up a cooler temperature it's going to keep adding pellets to get it back up to my set temperature. The same as an air conditioner which on highest speed we'll keep the compressor running longer as it is depleting its cold air faster.
 

Overfireinthehole

Minister of Fire
May 5, 2017
612
Miller MO
do not understand how fan setting can determine pellet usage. feed rate and thermostat setting to me is what determines pellet usage. in fact the higher the fan the cooler the air that comes out. a high fan setting actually cools the stove. I have a magnetic temp gauge and from low fan to high fan is almost 100 degrees
Technically it cools the stove down but the higher the setting the farther the heat is being pushed. I run mine on high fan at night and it keeps the bedrooms warmer than if it’s on low.
 

Tonyray

Minister of Fire
Technically it cools the stove down but the higher the setting the farther the heat is being pushed. I run mine on high fan at night and it keeps the bedrooms warmer than if it’s on low.
Of course it will reach those rooms on high faster . Since we run 24/7 running low fan the heat is already there so its just a matter of keeping the steady flow moving all the time. No need to do a fast heatup
 

bogieb

Minister of Fire
Oct 31, 2014
2,753
South Central NH
By unfinished basement, do you mean uninsulated? If so, those will suck the heat right out - my basement stove uses a lot less now that my walls are insulated and I put in a raised floor system.
 

Tonyray

Minister of Fire
By unfinished basement, do you mean uninsulated? If so, those will suck the heat right out - my basement stove uses a lot less now that my walls are insulated and I put in a raised floor system.
yep.. was going to put my P61A in the basement originally but it is un-finished..
around here it's called a cellar and the concrete block walls would have absorbed way to much of the heat output which
would have been a waste... thankfully we decided to put it in the living space upstairs..
 

Heat Slinger

Member
Sep 5, 2013
54
NB, Canada
My P68 will use about a bag every 12 hours at 0 to -10 deg C outside, more when it’s colder. It’s in the finished basement of my 2 story home, built in 2005. Heating about 3000 sqft total, well insulated. I’d say yours is doing what it should. P68 is a monster , it’ll chew through pellets. I burn about 200-220 bags/year.
 

Dataman

Minister of Fire
Sep 10, 2018
579
Newport, Wa
My P68 will use about a bag every 12 hours at 0 to -10 deg C outside, more when it’s colder. It’s in the finished basement of my 2 story home, built in 2005. Heating about 3000 sqft total, well insulated. I’d say yours is doing what it should. P68 is a monster , it’ll chew through pellets. I burn about 200-220 bags/year.
About the same on my Harmon XXV. 20's F outside is good for almost whole bag in 12 hours. 30s F low and it was 1/3 bag last night (8m start until 6am). When it gets about -10f I used up to 2 bags. 4.1 Tons last year, or about 210 bags in Rural Eastern Wa State (Newport WA). Or $1100 to heat the Winter. Right now it's 45f and Heat Pump until 8pm