Need Help - log cabin wood stove pipe install

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mudflap

New Member
Nov 9, 2021
3
Alabama
I've been trying to answer my own questions, and not getting very far, so thank you in advance:

I'm building a log cabin, and want to install a wood stove as a back up heat source. Here are the specifics of my install:

1. The cabin is built on piers, with 2x12 floor joists, 3/4" subfloor. The finished floor on the left side of the stove will be tile, and 3/4" T&G oak on the other. In front of the stove will be the living area (and all oak floor in front, after the bricks), behind the stove will be an island that is part of the kitchen (mostly tile). I plan on installing some kind of approved heat pad, and then bricks on top of that, then the stove on top of that.
2. The stove is an antique parlor stove: IMG20211108183347.jpg
3. The flue is 6".
4. The ceiling directly above the stove (see pic) is made out of 2x12 rough cut cants, overlaid with 2x6 pine T&G. The cants are spaced at 24" OC. The distance from the interior of the stove flue to the T&G ceiling is 6' 5".
5. The distance from the unfinished loft area (2nd floor) to the 2x6 T&G insulated roof is 14' 8". The roof is built in a style known as "built up roof" or cathedral roof - the layers of the roof are as follows: 2x6 T&G decking (1.5"), vapor barrier, insulation (EPS foam) (8"), held in place with 2x10 "sleepers" (10") (yes, 2" air gap for ventilation between the EPS foam and top edge of sleepers), 5/8" OSB, tar paper, then shingles. The plan is to situate the stove so as to penetrate the roof, avoiding rafters and sleepers. The thickness of the roof is roughly 13".
stove.PNG
In the photo, I drew in the stove pipe in blue. Sorry about the swing - my daughter needs something to do while I work on the cabin. :)

6. I'd like to do this economically, but also to code. It would be easy to have someone just come in and do it all for me, but I'm not that rich. I've built this entire cabin from trees I cut and peeled myself. I welded the support brackets for the 2nd floor, poured the concrete, built the doors from scratch. I'm pretty sure - given the correct information / parts list - I can figure out the stove pipe. The questions I'm running into is what parts do I need at the 1st floor ceiling, and at what point do I switch over to double wall pipe. The other question is what are the exact components I need to penetrate the roof besides the cathedral box (basically, through the roof parts, and the chimney stack itself)?

Also, this website says I can't interchange parts from different manufacturers for the same type of pipe (I can't use duravent and imperial brand single wall pipe in the same run) - but can I use Imperial single wall pipe and then switch over to duravent double wall pipe (and some kind of adapter)? That seems like it would fit within the rules.

Also, the pipe prices vary wildly - ebay, home depot, lowes, chimney pipe dealers, etc. trying to find the best price, too.

Can someone help me get a parts list together for the pipe?

Here's what I already know (correct me if I'm wrong / add to the list):
1. I can use single wall pipe from the stove to the 1st floor ceiling, then I have to use some kind of adapter and change over to double wall pipe.
2. I have to use double wall pipe from that point to the ceiling.
3. I have to use a cathedral box to get through the roof.
4. I have no idea after that. :)

Again, thanks in advance. Everywhere I go to ask questions leads me back here. But I can't find my exact question/answer here.

Best regards,
~mudflap
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,156
central pa
I've been trying to answer my own questions, and not getting very far, so thank you in advance:

I'm building a log cabin, and want to install a wood stove as a back up heat source. Here are the specifics of my install:

1. The cabin is built on piers, with 2x12 floor joists, 3/4" subfloor. The finished floor on the left side of the stove will be tile, and 3/4" T&G oak on the other. In front of the stove will be the living area (and all oak floor in front, after the bricks), behind the stove will be an island that is part of the kitchen (mostly tile). I plan on installing some kind of approved heat pad, and then bricks on top of that, then the stove on top of that.
2. The stove is an antique parler stove: View attachment 285091
3. The flue is 6".
4. The ceiling directly above the stove (see pic) is made out of 2x12 rough cut cants, overlaid with 2x6 pine T&G. The cants are spaced at 24" OC. The distance from the interior of the stove flue to the T&G ceiling is 6' 5".
5. The distance from the unfinished loft area (2nd floor) to the 2x6 T&G insulated roof is 14' 8". The roof is built in a style known as "built up roof" or cathedral roof - the layers of the roof are as follows: 2x6 T&G decking (1.5"), vapor barrier, insulation (EPS foam) (8"), held in place with 2x10 "sleepers" (10") (yes, 2" air gap for ventilation between the EPS foam and top edge of sleepers), 5/8" OSB, tar paper, then shingles. The plan is to situate the stove so as to penetrate the roof, avoiding rafters and sleepers. The thickness of the roof is roughly 13".
View attachment 285092
In the photo, I drew in the stove pipe in blue. Sorry about the swing - my daughter needs something to do while I work on the cabin. :)

6. I'd like to do this economically, but also to code. It would be easy to have someone just come in and do it all for me, but I'm not that rich. I've built this entire cabin from trees I cut and peeled myself. I welded the support brackets for the 2nd floor, poured the concrete, built the doors from scratch. I'm pretty sure - given the correct information / parts list - I can figure out the stove pipe. The questions I'm running into is what parts do I need at the 1st floor ceiling, and at what point do I switch over to double wall pipe. The other question is what are the exact components I need to penetrate the roof besides the cathedral box (basically, through the roof parts, and the chimney stack itself)?

Also, this website says I can't interchange parts from different manufacturers for the same type of pipe (I can't use duravent and imperial brand single wall pipe in the same run) - but can I use Imperial single wall pipe and then switch over to duravent double wall pipe (and some kind of adapter)? That seems like it would fit within the rules.

Also, the pipe prices vary wildly - ebay, home depot, lowes, chimney pipe dealers, etc. trying to find the best price, too.

Can someone help me get a parts list together for the pipe?

Here's what I already know (correct me if I'm wrong / add to the list):
1. I can use single wall pipe from the stove to the 1st floor ceiling, then I have to use some kind of adapter and change over to double wall pipe.
2. I have to use double wall pipe from that point to the ceiling.
3. I have to use a cathedral box to get through the roof.
4. I have no idea after that. :)

Again, thanks in advance. Everywhere I go to ask questions leads me back here. But I can't find my exact question/answer here.

Best regards,
~mudflap
Ok no one is going to make you a parts list. You can run single wall to the ceiling where you will need a support box to support the chimney pipe that will run out the roof. That pipe will also need to be enclosed in a chase through the living space.

As far as mixing brands most single wall is not ul listed so there is no rule against mixing brands but I absolutely would not recommend it it will fit and look much better if it all matches. And the chimney pipe and all components need to be the same type
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,156
central pa
I would also strongly suggest reconsidering your stove choice.
 
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sesmith

Feeling the Heat
Dec 11, 2009
275
Central NY
I think he's planning on going up through the floor of the loft (second story) area. Wouldn't the insulated chimney have to start there (unless he wanted to put in a huge hole for clearance)?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,156
central pa
I think he's planning on going up through the floor of the loft (second story) area. Wouldn't the insulated chimney have to start there (unless he wanted to put in a huge hole for clearance)?
Yes which is why I said support box at the ceiling then chimney pipe chased the rest of the way through the living space
 
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mudflap

New Member
Nov 9, 2021
3
Alabama
Ok, these are helpful comments.

So are you saying I need to build a chase 14' 8" high? Where does the chase stop exactly - at the cathedral box? or just below? and how far below?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,156
central pa
Ok, these are helpful comments.

So are you saying I need to build a chase 14' 8" high? Where does the chase stop exactly - at the cathedral box? or just below? and how far below?
You don't need a box at the top. The chimney is already supported by the box where the pipe meets the first ceiling. The chase will go from the loft floor to the ceiling. There you will have a firestop then flashing above
 

wjohn

Member
Jul 27, 2021
211
KS
Some chimney system manufacturers have brochures/PDFs detailing what parts you need for different types of installs (cathedral vs. ceiling/attic vs. 2 story etc.).
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
92,773
South Puget Sound, WA
Whether a chase or another option will work should be discussed with the inspecting authority. A variance may be possible. The point of the chase is to protect people from touching the chimney and to protect the chimney from people putting things too close to it and violating its clearance requirement. A friend convinced the local inspector to put a surrounding circular "cage" of expanded metal around the chimney. YMMV.
 
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mudflap

New Member
Nov 9, 2021
3
Alabama
Whether a chase or another option will work should be discussed with the inspecting authority. A variance may be possible. The point of the chase is to protect people from touching the chimney and to protect the chimney from people putting things too close to it and violating its clearance requirement. A friend convinced the local inspector to put a surrounding circular "cage" of expanded metal around the chimney. YMMV.
Ok, this makes sense to me. For now, this area will remain a loft - no plumbing, no outlets, no walls. It will be part of the interior of the home, but not lived in. At some future point, it will have a couple of rooms - and at that point, it would make sense to build a chase. I've been trying for a couple weeks to get hold of my inspector to see what he says, but it's a small town, and he just does the inspecting part time.

I just can't see the point of building a nearly 15' freestanding chase just to enclose a pipe that nobody is going to touch. Install a bedroom wall up there and then add an 8' chase? sure.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
92,773
South Puget Sound, WA
Lofts tend to accumulate stuff. If I were an inspector, I would want to see the chimney pipe protected, if it goes thru the loft.

I am confused about the chimney location. The first picture shows the stove under the loft, but the second picture shows the stovepipe out in the open area. As shown, the blue line (stovepipe?) does not penetrate any ceiling, just the roof. Is the loft going to be extended over the stove location at some point or will the stove always have an open cathedral ceiling over it? This will directly affect the parts requirement and will eliminate the concern about the chase because there will be no chimney pipe in the cabin, just stove pipe up to a cathedral ceiling support box. Above that, there will be chimney pipe.

Also, is there power at the cabin? With the stove in the open area, a ceiling fan or two will be necessary to move hot air that will pool up at the ceiling peak.

PS: This is an impressive effort and a lot of work. How did you seal between the logs? I don't see chinking.
 
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