New pellet install?

Ctwoodtick Posted By Ctwoodtick, May 30, 2018 at 8:18 PM

  1. Ctwoodtick

    Ctwoodtick
    Minister of Fire 2.
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    Jun 5, 2015
    710
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    Loc:
    Southeast CT
    F6798EF1-6946-4880-B399-0EFD7FF35C7A.jpeg 31EDCE58-A057-403A-A934-1592A1152176.jpeg 16C73217-AC7C-4C42-A650-59DB522B999B.jpeg 2E945AD3-3E25-402B-A6C3-D0B737B4A2B4.jpeg hi all, new to the pellet mill. I’ve been using a wood insert on my first floor for sometime. With an upcoming basement redo, I’d like to add a pellet stove in our basement. While most of basement will be finished, the pellet stove would be located in the unfinished section so it can vent into. masonry chimney flue outlet (8”). I’d have the install done professionally and would imagine I’d need a connector vent pipe to the connect into an insulated ss liner. I gave a few questions:
    I’m looking to heat the basement as a priority and any additional heat that I cAn get to travel upstairs would be welcomed. Would the unfinished nature of where the pellet stove would be likely rob a ton of heat it produces?
    My limited understanding of pellet stoves is that you basically have heat “on demand” and have a great deal of controllability with heat output. This would be compared to my wood insert, where if you load to much wood in, we’ll then, you’re stuck with that heat because you can’t “turn it off “ so to say.
    The unfinished part of basement is roughly 20 feet by about 12 feet, so about 240 sq ft. The finished part is about 20 by 25, so about 500 sq feet. The rooms are connected by the one door. Will a pellet stove have any issues with heating this space?
    The masonry flue outlet in basement would give the pellet stove about 19 or so feet of flue length. Will a basement install have any inherent draft or negative pressure problems?
     
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  2. Don2222

    Don2222
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    Feb 1, 2010
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    Hello
    Yes, negative pressure is a real problem. Therefore an Outside Air Kit is needed. I installed a Harman P61 in my basement and because there was only one flue in the chimney, I had to install a 6” diameter stainless steel chimney for my oil boiler. Then I slipped in. 4” SS liner in the block chimney for my pellet stove. To not only cure the negative pressure issue and the fight between the pellet stove and the boiler for fresh air, Installed an outside air kit for the Buderus Boiler and then what is better than just an outside air kit for the pellet stove, I went with the Selkirk Masonry conversion kit which has a special chimney top to bring in fresh air down the chimney around the glue liner to warm up the fresh air a bit and then into the pellet stove fresh air intake! The nice warm fresh air makes the pellet stove 10% more efficient. It also keeps the Burn pot cleaner! The best way to go without a doubt!
    Pic 1 - Boiler OAK
    Pic 2 - 4 is the Selkirk Masonry chimney adapter kit
     

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  3. Ctwoodtick

    Ctwoodtick
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    Jun 5, 2015
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    Loc:
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    Thanks for your response! Forgive me for my pellet stove ignorance. So with my set up where I’m utilizing the basement outlet of the masonry chimney, where would my OAK be located/installed?
    For background, the 8x8 terra cotta liner that this chimney outlet/crock goes into is where I’d put the ss liner for the pellet stove. The fireplace portion of this masonry chimney contains my wood insert.
    Thanks
     
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  4. Ctwoodtick

    Ctwoodtick
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    Jun 5, 2015
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    I also should ask if there would be any problem with running a pellet stove while running my wood insert. Same masonry chimney, but running from 2 separate liners.
     
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  5. doghouse

    doghouse
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    Dec 9, 2008
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    2 separate liners is the preferred method. The Selkirk liner Don mentioned has the OAK as part of the vent pipe; inside for exhaust and the outer part for the OAK.
     
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  6. Ctwoodtick

    Ctwoodtick
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    Jun 5, 2015
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    With my use of wood insert right next to where I plan to vent the pellet stove at top if masonry, I’m guessing that that OAK drawing in exhaust from my wood insert liner would be a big no-no, correct?
     
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  7. Don2222

    Don2222
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    Feb 1, 2010
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    The Selkirk system takes all the fresh air from around the liner(s) and puts it into 1 - 3” diameter flex pipe to attach to 1 strove. So you would need a seperate OAK kit for the wood insert and another hole in the side of your house for the wood Insert to get it’s own outside air.
     
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