Pacific energy summit insert

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Pacificsummit

New Member
Dec 5, 2020
9
Pennsylvania
This year moved into a new house and had a pacific energy summit insert installed this summer. Have been burning wood for a bit now and not getting long burn times, any heat output, etc. Supposed to be getting 6-10 hours of burn time on a load and I’m getting 2 hours max before it’s coals. There is no heat output from the stove either. I think it is all going up the chimney. Had the stove running for 5 days and no heat into house.
Burning split and seasoned mixed hardwoods moisture content 20-25%. Called installer and they have never heard of this. I’m trying to get them to come look at it. Any thoughts?
 
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armanidog

Feeling the Heat
Jan 8, 2017
365
Northeast Georgia
Try using an incense stick or a long match and see if anyplace is sucking the smoke into the stove. It could be an air leak.
Meanwhile, post a photo of the stove in the fireplace.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,618
South Puget Sound, WA
How much are you closing the air down and when?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,618
South Puget Sound, WA
How many splits are being loaded? Is there a thermometer on the stove face above the door corner? If not, do you have an IR thermometer that can give us a read on that area?
 

Pacificsummit

New Member
Dec 5, 2020
9
Pennsylvania
There’s no thermometer on the stove and I don’t have an IR. I stack splits in layers of three alternating one layer EW then NS then EW if I have enough room for the third stack
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
How tall is the liner?
Is there a block off plate installed where the liner goes through the damper area?
Don't be afraid to load the stove full and turn the air all the way to low when charred, if need be.
Check the door gasket, window gasket and check door with dollar bill test.
 

Pacificsummit

New Member
Dec 5, 2020
9
Pennsylvania
The liner is approximately 30 ft tall. No block plate. With a full load and full damper close burn time is no more than 2.5 hours. Also brand new stove so would be surprised if the gaskets were bad out of the factory
 

Hogwildz

Minister of Fire
The liner is approximately 30 ft tall. No block plate. With a full load and full damper close burn time is no more than 2.5 hours. Also brand new stove so would be surprised if the gaskets were bad out of the factory
30' is tall, which is also prolly drafting fast/hard.
No block off plate is letting the heated air rise up the old chimney, rather than out into the room & living space. This can be a major issue of heat loss. Did you check the door adjustment? They are NOT adjusted at the factory. Time for a dollar bill test. It is possible for the gasket cement to let loose and let the gasket just dangle there. Easy enough to inspect and check.

There is no way that stove only burns for 2.5 hours and does not produce heat.
There are other issues at play here than the stove. First thing to do is dollar bill test and get a block off plate installed. What are temps getting to during the burn?
 

Pacificsummit

New Member
Dec 5, 2020
9
Pennsylvania
Took an infrared reading this morning after one load (burned for less than two hours) 400 degree reading in the far right corner, 450 above the door and 350 top left corner here’s a picture at time of reading the damper is a little more than half way closed to low.
image.jpg
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,618
South Puget Sound, WA
That's a tall liner. I agree with your initial concern and think most of your heat is headed straight up the flue. That's not good for the liner if it is continuously running over 1000º. The insert door temp appears to be running about 100-150º cooler than I would expect with that fire. With this very strong draft, you should always be turning the air all the way down once the fire is strong, Closing the primary air down creates a vacuum in the firebox that pulls more air through the secondary air holes for a more complete combustion. I would also block off the boost-air port with a magnet or metal tape.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,618
South Puget Sound, WA
It should be located front and center, under the front edge of the firebox.
 

Pacificsummit

New Member
Dec 5, 2020
9
Pennsylvania
Got it thanks. I’m going to have the installer come this week cause it can’t keep running like this and not get any heat out of it and the potential for damage to the liner. I’ll see what they have to say.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,618
South Puget Sound, WA
The Summit is an easy breathing stove. It works very well on one story chimneys for this reason. In this case it is not working in your favor. The easy solution on a freestander would be to add a key damper to the stovepipe, but that's not an option for and insert. Read this article for some thoughts. It's written by John Gulland who has a PE stove.
 
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Pacificsummit

New Member
Dec 5, 2020
9
Pennsylvania
Unfortunately none of those options sound great as they each have drawbacks. Do you know if this happens with stoves with catalytics as well on two+ story chimneys?
 

DuaeGuttae

Minister of Fire
Oct 26, 2016
1,005
Texas
Maybe @saydinli could chime in here. I believe that his PE fireplace had too much draft, and the installer diagnosed the situation with a special door that PE provided, and PE recommended a restrictor plate at the top of the chimney. I am under the impression that that worked out but didn't go back to investigate.