Pacific Energy Summit LE

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jaimedee16

New Member
Dec 13, 2020
17
Saskatchewan
Brand new Pacific Energy Summit LE, professionally installed beginning of November. This is about 45 minutes after lighting, using kiln dried wood, with the air turned all the way off. And it keeps burning this way until the wood is gone. Both lower corners of the glass glaze over almost right away, and a fair amount of creosote build up right inside the door. Is it pulling air through a poor door seal? There also seems to be a gap at the base of the stove pipe where the smoke ring sits, and when we pulled it all apart, quite a bit of creosote build up already. Flue temps are cooler right above the stove and then heat up as you go up towards the ceiling. Might it be pulling air from the connection between the stove and the stove pipe? The stove pipe was much dirtier than the chimney when we cleaned it all, which seems backwards.
 

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john26

Minister of Fire
Oct 27, 2008
633
Wildwood MO
When the stove is cool try closing the door with a dollar bill pinched in there after the door is latched try to slide it out. try this in several spots primarily where you think there could be a leak. Also if you have an ash dump make sure that is fully closed. Usually creosote build up in the pipe is a sign of wet or green wood. I would think if you were burning fast and hot you would see less creosote in the pipe it would be more of a white or tan color.
 

WoodScrounger

New Member
Oct 11, 2020
48
Ontario
I can’t view the clip posted for some reason.
I would think that if it’s burning hot the only reason for creosote would be moisture. You say kiln dried wood but do you happen to know the MC?
What is the setup? Flue size and height
Not to implicate anyone but unfortunately “professional” isn’t always right. I don’t know your installer or situation just saying there are “professionals” and then there are installers that do professional work
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
Post some pictures of the flue collar and stovepipe connection. If there is a >1/8" gap there it should be filled.

If you have a maul or ax, take some of the thicker splits and split them again in half. Press the freshly exposed face of wood against your skin. Does it feel cool and damp? If so the wood may not be fully seasoned.
 

jaimedee16

New Member
Dec 13, 2020
17
Saskatchewan
Post some pictures of the flue collar and stovepipe connection. If there is a >1/8" gap there it should be filled.

If you have a maul or ax, take some of the thicker splits and split them again in half. Press the freshly exposed face of wood against your skin. Does it feel cool and damp? If so the wood may not be fully seasoned.


Moisture content seems to be fine. I’ve attached pics of the stove pipe and glue collar. It sure seems like it is pulling air from somewhere, or maybe we need a flue damper? We’ve been burning it hotter, but corners of the glass still blacken almost immediately. And still, once the air is turned down to low, we have a fire box full flames on only 3 pieces of wood, with stove top temps over 600. If air is completely closed, the secondary’s kick in and spike the temps even hotter. Also a new thing the past few days is once the temps get up there, flames begin burning from the top and sides of the boost plate. Super frustrated with this thing!
 

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
That doesn't look out of the ordinary. By boost plate, do you mean the baffle. If the draft is strong, with the air all the way closed, secondary combustion will increase and the stovetop will get hotter. Post a picture or two of how the stove is getting loaded.
 

moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,842
Iowa
Moisture content seems to be fine. I’ve attached pics of the stove pipe and glue collar. It sure seems like it is pulling air from somewhere, or maybe we need a flue damper? We’ve been burning it hotter, but corners of the glass still blacken almost immediately. And still, once the air is turned down to low, we have a fire box full flames on only 3 pieces of wood, with stove top temps over 600. If air is completely closed, the secondary’s kick in and spike the temps even hotter. Also a new thing the past few days is once the temps get up there, flames begin burning from the top and sides of the boost plate. Super frustrated with this thing!


Sooo? On the next load can you reduce your primary air setting a whole lot sooner to see if you can retard the aggressive burn?
Blackening of the door glass may not be really abnormal as well as build up in your connector pipe. Buy a moisture meter and verify content. You may be surprised. Many are.
Your stove top temps do not sound out of line at 600. If not higher.
"Boost plate"? Do you mean your baffle that provides secondary combustion air up top in the fire box? If so, it should be producing active flame above the fuel load and it will increase stove top temp.

Sounds like common tube stove behavior that may just need some operation fine tuning. Don't give up! You will get a handle on it.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,309
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
I see you have a nice probe meter in nice double wall pipe. Good. Are the temperatures you quote flue temperatures?

It is normal to have those temperatures between 400 and 900. If you’re burning cleanly, you may have no choice but to experience flue temperatures in the upper end of that range during the early stages of the burn. Especially with very dry wood.

Trying to force the flue temps to stay cooler than what is necessary for clean combustion can result in dirty combustion and dirty glass.
 
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jaimedee16

New Member
Dec 13, 2020
17
Saskatchewan
That doesn't look out of the ordinary. By boost plate, do you mean the baffle. If the draft is strong, with the air all the way closed, secondary combustion will increase and the stovetop will get hotter. Post a picture or two of how the stove is getting loaded.


Not the baffle at the top of the stove, it’s at the front of the stove, right in front of the door. The manual calls it the “boost air manifold”. I attached a short video of this evenings craziness, I’m not sure if you can tell the flames I’m speaking of. I also attached a video from a couple days ago and you can see a flame appearing to come out of the manifold along the front of the box. Today the stove ran very well all day, and it was quite windy outside. Tonight we loaded it with 5 smaller pieces of wood and it took off almost immediately. Flue temps up around 900 and stovetop over 750. Hotter than the IR heatgun would measure. Tried to cut the primary air and we started getting fire from all 5 holes on that manifold, and from between the manifold and the ash lip. Once it was back under control, we noticed that the wind had died down outside. Would this contribute? Bi-level house, stove is in the basement, total length of flue from stovetop to chimney cap is about 23ft and the flue runs through the middle of the house. Seems like the stove is very uncontrollable and unpredictable, and we are thinking a flue damper is needed? We spoke with the installer about our concerns and he doesn’t think we need one, but we have been struggling with keeping the stove under control and have yet to fully load it due to the concerns we may burn the house down

Not sure if this would affect things but have noticed that the EBT2 opens as soon as the door is closed, and never closes again until the door is opened again.
 

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jaimedee16

New Member
Dec 13, 2020
17
Saskatchewan
When the stove is cool try closing the door with a dollar bill pinched in there after the door is latched try to slide it out. try this in several spots primarily where you think there could be a leak. Also if you have an ash dump make sure that is fully closed. Usually creosote build up in the pipe is a sign of wet or green wood. I would think if you were burning fast and hot you would see less creosote in the pipe it would be more of a white or tan color.


The guy we bought the wood from says it’s dried to 8-10%. We cut a piece and used the moisture meter, and it didn’t even register any moisture. We’ve been burning hotter lately, so will pull everything apart in the next week or so to see if that’s made any difference
 

jaimedee16

New Member
Dec 13, 2020
17
Saskatchewan
I see you have a nice probe meter in nice double wall pipe. Good. Are the temperatures you quote flue temperatures?

It is normal to have those temperatures between 400 and 900. If you’re burning cleanly, you may have no choice but to experience flue temperatures in the upper end of that range during the early stages of the burn. Especially with very dry wood.

Trying to force the flue temps to stay cooler than what is necessary for clean combustion can result in dirty combustion and dirty glass.
I see you have a nice probe meter in nice double wall pipe. Good. Are the temperatures you quote flue temperatures?

It is normal to have those temperatures between 400 and 900. If you’re burning cleanly, you may have no choice but to experience flue temperatures in the upper end of that range during the early stages of the burn. Especially with very dry wood.

Trying to force the flue temps to stay cooler than what is necessary for clean combustion can result in dirty combustion and dirty glass.

We’ve seen flue temps as high as 900-1000 when it’s gotten out of control, but typically range 400-600
 

sheadu061

New Member
Dec 23, 2020
49
Minnesota
Slightly off topic, what are your burn times with your PE? How many sq ft and what style is your house? Just went into a dealer and he said the Summit might be too large for my open concept 1500 sq ft main level house. I'm having a hard time deciding on a stove.
 

jaimedee16

New Member
Dec 13, 2020
17
Saskatchewan
Our house is 1100 sq ft per floor, bi level style and the stove is in the basement. On a half load, we get 3-4 hours. We haven’t loaded the stove right up yet, just until we get the hang of it. Since there’s generally someone home during the day to reload it, it keeps our house a comfortable 20 degrees C throughout the day, with outdoor temps dipping to -20 C or so during the day. We don’t burn it over night yet either.