Quadrafire Mt. Vernon Insert Broken firebox bolt

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Ashley S.

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
9
Washington
So being the independent woman that I am I watched some videos and decided to take on replacing my ignitor. Couldn’t see how to get to it through the ash tray slot so opted for option #2 of removing the firepot and promptly sheared off one of the bolts. So now I have created a second problem for myself.

Sounds like drilling though I have no idea what drill I will need to get into that tight spot, and taping or helicoil is my best bet at this time to fix my bolt issue. However I know with the high heat that I need to be picky to get the correct bolts etc. Does anyone know the specs on the OEM bolts so I can get what I need in one trip to the hardware store.

Also if anyone can tell me where the model number is definitively cause I’m not sure if mine is an E2 or AE model and was hoping when I removed the ignitor to order the new one that it would have the correct code so I didn’t have to find help to pull this monstrosity out of its fireplace hole.

Thank you all, my first freeze is just a couple days away and trying to get this up and running ASAP. image.jpg
 

clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
1,730
Colorado
I would not know where to begin and all I can do at the moment is push this thread up to the front again so that you will get help with drilling this bolt I guess out and replace it but I am not sure..More power to you for knowing all this and attempting this fix on your heater...Hope you get warm soon especially in your state where it can get quite damp as well...There are knowledgeable people on here that will point you in the right direction as for me all I can say is --your picture is beautiful and clear...and welcome to this wonderful forum...clancey
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,462
SE North Carolina
Soak with what ever penetrating oil you have (wd40). Hit the other bolt to. Looks like it might be easier if you can remove the fire pot. Looks like there may be a bit to grab with some vice grips once the pot it out. If you have a little butane torch (the kitchen kind) a little heat around the bolt to expand the hole can be very helpful.

Bolt extractor my be helpful?? Hope you can just get vice grips on it.

 

Ashley S.

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
9
Washington
So stoped by the hardware store on my way home soaked the left side in penetrating lubricant. slowly tried working it in and out...sheared that side too...and well the penetrating lubricant destroyed the gasket so a new one of those is ordered

the 90* angle attachment I bought is too short for the extrator I found...but determined I have an “E2” so I have the correct igniter on order as well. Now I have a week to solve for bolt shaft extraction. Ordered some left handed drill Bits and extractor set that should be here Tuesday....

All said and done still cheaper than a technician...but the hassle is annoying.
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Never use WD40 as a penetrating oil, it isn't. Use either PBlaster or a mixture of Dexron (red) ATF and Acetone in a spritz bottle, 1/3 ATF, 2/3rd's acetone.

WD 40 is a moisture dispersant and light duty lubricant. It's NOT a penetrating oil.

In reality, HEAT is your best corrosion breaker. A propane torch to heat a bolt up (broken or not), usually will get it out. heat and appropriate wrench or a pair of Vice Grips.

My preference is the ATF / acetone in a spritz bottle. It's cheap to make and works as good as anything else, sometimes I think even better.

Far as broken bolt extraction tools go, I pay little attention to the 'Project Farm' guy. I use Snap-On spline drive extractors when my other methods won't work. They aren't cheap but the work for me every time. If you don't have access to Snap-On, Sunnex makes an almost identical set and they are on Amazon.

Keep in mind that besides farming I have a fabrication shop so I'm fiddling with corroded parts and failed welds, all the time. Have an excavator in the side yard right now that needs some serious bucket and pivot work and a very large bucket off of an articulated front end loader (A Cat), the owner ripped the side out of and it needs the grouser teeth replaced.
 

johneh

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
3,745
Eastern Ontario
Have an excavator in the side yard right now that needs some serious bucket and pivot work and a very large bucket off of an articulated front end loader (A Cat), the owner ripped the side out of and it needs the grouser teeth replaced.
Better you than me
finished with that crap 6 years ago was so happy
to retire now just an old farmer no more equipment repair, custom furniture
auto repair . solar R&d or custom fabrication
just field after field sitten on the Kabota A few head of beef and some other critters
no stress any more
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Better you than me
finished with that crap 6 years ago was so happy
to retire now just an old farmer no more equipment repair, custom furniture
auto repair . solar R&d or custom fabrication
just field after field sitten on the Kabota A few head of beef and some other critters
no stress any more
No stress for me really. I like heavy fabrication and especially TIG welding not that repairing buckets requires it. I tend to use a glue gun or SMAW. Have an ESAB pulsed MIG unit that does spray transfer quite well.

My customers all know not to rush me, not rushable, especially when farming. Sold off the cattle and the last draft horse my wife had died a few months ago so all that once was pasture will be in hay. In fact, I just sprayed it with 2-4-D to kill off the broadleaf and I'll fit it in the spring for vernal alfalfa and orchard grass.

Have 2 Kubota's myself (in John Deere country no less), 2 M9's. one with a cab, one open station. Always owned Kubota's. Have a great dealer, personal friends with the owner and I shoot / hunt with his head mechanic.

One is a 2004 (cab model) I bought it new and had to order it, took 6 months to get because in 2004, Kubota quit making the M9 series so my dealer did some footwork and Kubota had the parts to built a last one and I have it. Completely optioned out too, 3 sets of remotes with flow control, 2 speed pto, cold weather intake kit, creep gears and third function with outlets on the front loader. The other one I picked up used from a JD dealer who didn't know what he had for cheap. Had my dealer go completely through it and I did a sheet metal off complete cosmetic resto on it. Came out pretty nice. Both are strong, make well in the excess of rated pto power and are extremely frugal on fuel. No emissions junk either. I don't do T4 final stuff.

Here you go...

100_0010 (1).JPG 100_0013 (1).JPG
 
Last edited:

Ashley S.

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
9
Washington
Never use WD40 as a penetrating oil, it isn't. Use either PBlaster or a mixture of Dexron (red) ATF and Acetone in a spritz bottle, 1/3 ATF, 2/3rd's acetone.

WD 40 is a moisture dispersant and light duty lubricant. It's NOT a penetrating oil.

In reality, HEAT is your best corrosion breaker. A propane torch to heat a bolt up (broken or not), usually will get it out. heat and appropriate wrench or a pair of Vice Grips.

My preference is the ATF / acetone in a spritz bottle. It's cheap to make and works as good as anything else, sometimes I think even better.

Far as broken bolt extraction tools go, I pay little attention to the 'Project Farm' guy. I use Snap-On spline drive extractors when my other methods won't work. They aren't cheap but the work for me every time. If you don't have access to Snap-On, Sunnex makes an almost identical set and they are on Amazon.

Keep in mind that besides farming I have a fabrication shop so I'm fiddling with corroded parts and failed welds, all the time. Have an excavator in the side yard right now that needs some serious bucket and pivot work and a very large bucket off of an articulated front end loader (A Cat), the owner ripped the side out of and it needs the grouser teeth replaced.
Well I fixed my bolts…grinder used carefully installed new rivnuts added 1.5” 1/4-20 grade 8 bolts and had to also replace the gasket underneath.

Next problem…turned it on and it does not light itself…just like before just dumps pellets forever….however I did learn from reading through these forums that one can manually light a pellet stove so I tried it….it seems to be working fine….so next question is did I get a bad ignitor or is my control board bad.

image.jpg
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Don't have the luxury of cal rod ignition. I have to manually light mine every time. My stove was made before they did electric ignition.

What I do is I take a large plastic jar with a screw on lid (like the peanut butter stuffed pretzels come) in and I fill it 3/4 full of pellets and then I dump in liquid fire starter and let the pellets soak it up. When I start it, I put in a handfull of pellets, light them with a wooden match, close the door and start the stove.

I used to use Rutland squirt on fire starter but the soaked pellets works just as well.

In reality, electric ignition don't work well with corn anyway. Corn takes a much higher temperature to ignite, even with pellets mixed in like I do.

One plastic jar lasts me all season.
 

joescho

Feeling the Heat
Feb 11, 2009
390
Northeastern PA
Well I fixed my bolts…grinder used carefully installed new rivnuts added 1.5” 1/4-20 grade 8 bolts and had to also replace the gasket underneath.

Next problem…turned it on and it does not light itself…just like before just dumps pellets forever….however I did learn from reading through these forums that one can manually light a pellet stove so I tried it….it seems to be working fine….so next question is did I get a bad ignitor or is my control board bad.

View attachment 283495
That would make me think either the ignitor is bad - which you can test if you have a meter - (measure for ohms if its zero then its bad), or its the wrong one (which I kind if doubt because by now you seem to be fairly familiar with all of this) or the board isn't sending 120v to the ignitor on start up which you can also test with a meter.
 

Ashley S.

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
9
Washington
Don't have the luxury of cal rod ignition. I have to manually light mine every time. My stove was made before they did electric ignition.

What I do is I take a large plastic jar with a screw on lid (like the peanut butter stuffed pretzels come) in and I fill it 3/4 full of pellets and then I dump in liquid fire starter and let the pellets soak it up. When I start it, I put in a handfull of pellets, light them with a wooden match, close the door and start the stove.

I used to use Rutland squirt on fire starter but the soaked pellets works just as well.

In reality, electric ignition don't work well with corn anyway. Corn takes a much higher temperature to ignite, even with pellets mixed in like I do.

One plastic jar lasts me all season.
Except my stove has a thermostat so it can’t relight itself at 3am when the thermostat says it’s needs to be turned back on….
 

Ashley S.

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
9
Washington
That would make me think either the ignitor is bad - which you can test if you have a meter - (measure for ohms if its zero then its bad), or its the wrong one (which I kind if doubt because by now you seem to be fairly familiar with all of this) or the board isn't sending 120v to the ignitor on start up which you can also test with a meter.
Now I must go see if I have one of those…I know I’ve bought several, but I’ve had tools stolen a few times and that isn’t something I use often, so it could have disappeared a long time ago :/
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Except my stove has a thermostat so it can’t relight itself at 3am when the thermostat says it’s needs to be turned back on….
I don't. Mine is on a remote thermostat as well but when the T'stat is satisified, my unit idles down to just maintaining a fire, it never goes out. I actually prefer it that way.

Been idling along for a couple days now. I'm on straight pellets presently and one bag is lasting about 30 hours. Don't believe I'd want any unit with a cal rod igniter.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,462
SE North Carolina
Nothing like learning new skill to put to use later;)
Glad is running.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Well it turned out it was a bad board. It’s all doing it’s thing now.
Make sure you have a quality surge protector on the line cord. As usual, I recommend a Tripp Lite outlet attached surge protector. Available on Amazon, about 35 bucks and worth every penny.
 

Ashley S.

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
9
Washington
Make sure you have a quality surge protector on the line cord. As usual, I recommend a Tripp Lite outlet attached surge protector. Available on Amazon, about 35 bucks and worth every penny.
Well I’m seeing this probably too late…so I am back to my original problem again.

Initially the stove wasn’t igniting and I was ending up with pellet stove dumping pellets until it would throw an error code…so I figured the issue was the ignitor…so I tore into it to replace the ignitor and well that didn’t fix the problem but replacing the board did…now I’m back to the same broken issue and $300 wasted fixing it…so I’m open to suggestions at this point.
 

joescho

Feeling the Heat
Feb 11, 2009
390
Northeastern PA
Well I’m seeing this probably too late…so I am back to my original problem again.

Initially the stove wasn’t igniting and I was ending up with pellet stove dumping pellets until it would throw an error code…so I figured the issue was the ignitor…so I tore into it to replace the ignitor and well that didn’t fix the problem but replacing the board did…now I’m back to the same broken issue and $300 wasted fixing it…so I’m open to suggestions at this point.
There's something more going on here whether its something internal to the stove shorting out your board to some strange power issues. If you blow two boards within that amount of time there's something else going on. Maybe a bare wire inside the stove that touches the metal inside or power surges in your house. If its a power surge within your house you can plug a surge protector into that outlet (don't plug anything into it) and see if it trips. If it is a surge it should eventually trip.

If not, then its something in your stove. First I would make sure you have no bare wires that can be touching. Then if you have any snap discs in the stove check those to see if they're tripped (they could be old and weak and trip easy). Then check your board for obvious blow outs or burn marks. That might tell you what the culprit is by where it's burnt. If not, The only other way I can think of is maybe using a meter or something like that to find what is blown which again will give you a good guess what the culprit is.

If all else fails you may have to bite the bullet and get a pro to help you.

That's a tough one I hope you figure it out.
 

Ashley S.

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
9
Washington
There's something more going on here whether its something internal to the stove shorting out your board to some strange power issues. If you blow two boards within that amount of time there's something else going on. Maybe a bare wire inside the stove that touches the metal inside or power surges in your house. If its a power surge within your house you can plug a surge protector into that outlet (don't plug anything into it) and see if it trips. If it is a surge it should eventually trip.

If not, then its something in your stove. First I would make sure you have no bare wires that can be touching. Then if you have any snap discs in the stove check those to see if they're tripped (they could be old and weak and trip easy). Then check your board for obvious blow outs or burn marks. That might tell you what the culprit is by where it's burnt. If not, The only other way I can think of is maybe using a meter or something like that to find what is blown which again will give you a good guess what the culprit is.

If all else fails you may have to bite the bullet and get a pro to help you.

That's a tough one I hope you figure it out.
The Mt. Vernon saga continue…looked over the diagnostic manual that someone was able to get me…and my quad light issue is either a board or ignitor issue again…fun fact the ignitor is getting warm…so it is neither the board or the ignitor…

Now what????

53783239-FBCF-4C5F-BD27-5825A0B1461B.png
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
I do have to ask, did you get a genuine board or some aftermarket one?
 

Ashley S.

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
9
Washington
Oh I feel like a complete dumb blonde….the manual starting the damn thing clogged up the firepot…it just needed to be cleaned and it works just fine.

Now to buy a surge protector and hopefully not have any more issues lol.
 
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Mt Bob

Minister of Fire
Oct 31, 2013
3,326
park county montana
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
They are 32 bucks on Amazon with free shipping in white or black. Me, I prefer black as it don't show the dirt. ;lol