Stove suggestion to replace VC 1977 vigilant

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neverstop

New Member
Oct 11, 2020
86
new hampshire
Oh sorry, didn't mean for that to divulge into an argument in my absence. Expecting my first kid in October so I've been working on the nursery. That is actually another motivation to get a newer stove; new baby in the house.

In regards to the advice I was given at the store; it was from the store owner. It's a tiny shop and 1 man operation. His recommendation was based on previous experience of his customers with catted stoves. He said customers had issues with cats not functioning correctly and having to be replaced every 2-3 years to the tune of a couple of hundred $$ (I wasn't aware of the limited life expectancy of a cat). He additionally was suggesting to look at stoves with welded steel fireboxes vs cast-iron (which I had already decided on prior to talking to him). This was to cut down on maintenance. He's a good guy overall, he wasn't pushy on anything and he answered all of the questions that I had for him. His suggestions stemmed from customer complaints, and I assume his assessment of me (young guy, no experience with woodstoves).

I burned probably on average 8 hrs/day from October-March of last burning season. I would have burnt more if the stove was capable of longer burns and I had confidence in its operation.

If I could have my cake and eat it too I'd be looking for a stove that has:
  • steel firebox
  • 12+ hr burns
  • qualifies for the 2021 tax credit since I'm including a new installation (~$2,200 additional on the high end?)
  • temperature control that works well (i have no comparison other than the 40yr VC)
  • low maintenance

TL;DR: store owner was nice, suggestions stemmed from customer complaints and cat cost $. have a kid on the way so would like a low maintenance stove that achieves long burns, qualifies for the tax credit and is low maintenance.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,473
SE North Carolina
  • steel firebox
  • 12+ hr burns
  • qualifies for the 2021 tax credit since I'm including a new installation (~$2,200 additional on the high end?)
  • temperature control that works well (i have no comparison other than the 40yr VC)
  • low maintenance
ja Roby might be the only one that comes close but it’s not going to get 12 hours. Going to have to make a compromise somewhere.

As for the cats they say 10,000 hours. 8 hours a day is two loads call it 12 ( for 180 days or 2200 hours a year) so you could expect 4-5 years out of a cat. 250$ every 5 years for long slow burns seems reasonable

all stoves need regular maintenance; sweep the flue, new gaskets every so often, maybe new bricks or a baffle board.

You will probably be money ahead to go with a biger Drolet or Englander stove and not use the the tax credit.
Just my thoughts.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,791
Northern Maine
If I’m researching something and asking questions I’m absolutely talking to a few people and listening to their POV. What they are saying is their opinion. As such, I’ll take it under advisement.
No one person or shop knows it all.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,473
SE North Carolina
Low and slow is a must, I can deal with $250 every 4-5 yrs if it enables me to easily burn overnight and while I'm at work.
Sweeping your own flue saves that much a year. Tax credit will save enough for maybe 20 years worth of cats? I think it’s where many/most stoves are headed in the next decade. Pm 2.5 pollution is going to get more not less attention.

evan
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,937
Long Island NY
The 30 fireboxes of BKs would allow that (if your chimney meets the requirements).
My very first try of low and slow reached about a 24 burn before reloading on hot coals.

There are other stoves too, though I would note that for low and slow it is really nice to have an even output so that if the wood settled while you're gone, and the rate goes up a bit, you don't come home to an cold stove. The thermostat on a BK automatically adjusts the airflow when the heat output changes.

I'll let others comment/recommend other stoves.
 

neverstop

New Member
Oct 11, 2020
86
new hampshire
I'm between the hearthstone heritage and the hearthstone shelbourne. They both have rear exit options lower than my current thimble height.

So my question now is: is there any reason the stove couldn't be installed similar to what is shown below with the flue pipe having 2 45s to reach the required thimble height?

1630429021719.png
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,937
Long Island NY
IF the stoves have the rear exit option, I would think that that should not be a problem. In fact, going slightly up is better than going flat horizontal for 2 ft before doing a 90 degree up. Given their rear exit, they should do well with a horizontal run (see if you can download the manual to see if they have requirements for the max horizontal run), and your drawing is likely to impede draft less than a flat (or 1" per foot rise) horizontal run.

But, see if you can fnd a manual. BK manuals are pretty specific in what they need as minimum requirements. I'd hope other stoves are similarly informative in their manuals.
 

neverstop

New Member
Oct 11, 2020
86
new hampshire
IF the stoves have the rear exit option, I would think that that should not be a problem. In fact, going slightly up is better than going flat horizontal for 2 ft before doing a 90 degree up. Given their rear exit, they should do well with a horizontal run (see if you can download the manual to see if they have requirements for the max horizontal run), and your drawing is likely to impede draft less than a flat (or 1" per foot rise) horizontal run.

But, see if you can fnd a manual. BK manuals are pretty specific in what they need as minimum requirements. I'd hope other stoves are similarly informative in their manuals.

all it says is that the minimum chimney height for a rear exit install is 15' and that the horizontal run out of the stove should have at least a 0.25" rise per linear foot.