US Stove 5500M, how to slow down feed rate?

tlc1976 Posted By tlc1976, Oct 7, 2012 at 3:49 PM

  1. Rishar

    Rishar
    New Member 2.
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    Dec 8, 2017
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    Sorry to hear that.

    It's a tiny house situation. 350sq.ft. Well insulated. I've had to lower the feed rate quite a bit just to not broil myself.

    If by chance you could give me some pointers, it would be appreciated. The link in your post no longer seems to work. I know I'm probably asking for a lot here.
     
  2. tlc1976

    tlc1976
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Oct 7, 2012
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    Loc:
    Northwest Lower Michigan
    How are you with electronics? I'm not a whiz but I can do some things. Obviously you're going to have to ground things.

    For starters I got a Honeywell Heat-Only thermostat. Removed the anticipator. And backed off the screws to increase the temp swing, since the largest temp swing you can live with will minimize how much the stove cycles on and off.

    The thermostat goes to a 12v spdt relay. Run 12v thru the thermostat thru the relay, so when it calls for heat the thermostat completes the circuit and sends 12v to the relay coil. You also want 12v to go to the COM relay terminal.

    The link probably went to how to build a 12v single shot, 1 second 555 timer module. Took a lot of trial and error for me. You can actually buy these off ebay for super cheap. You need two, maybe get some spares, I don't know how good they are. Each of the NO and NC terminals of the relay, you will connect to the input of a timer module.

    You will also need two 9v spst or spdt relays. Each of the timer module outputs you will connect to a 9v relay coil. From the COM relay terminal, you'll connect both relays together, then connect to an 80-100 ohm resistor, then to pin 7 on the stove board. The NO terminal of the main thermostat relay is for power on. So follow from the NO terminal of the thermostat relay, through the timer module and 9v relay that's connected to it, and connect the NO terminal of that 9v relay to stove board pin 4 (on button). Then connect the NO terminal of the other 9v relay to stove board pin 3 (off button).

    (I would check these connections and the ohms with a multimeter before connecting everything else to it, since no guarantee it's the same 5 years later. Like probe pin 7 and 4, hold ON button, see if you get around 80 ohms or whatever. Same with pin 7 and 3 and the OFF button.)

    All of this I built into a little enclosure, and powered by a wall wart with the voltage I described. You have to make sure it has enough voltage where it doesn't drag down and stop it from working, which I had to remedy early on, hence the 9v relays. I had plenty of wall warts laying around. I fastened the thermostat to the cover of the enclosure.

    You also want the box somewhere away from the stove that you don't get false readings. Outdoor phone wire is cheap and makes a good connector from the 9v relays to the stove board. You could even get fancy and put some quick connects to make things easier.

    I never did add the delay timer to the wall wart power supply, but if you have power outages it would be a good idea. Could probably find a single shot delay timer module off ebay for cheap. Delay it by maybe 30 sec. So when the power comes back on, the stove has a chance to boot up, then it "pushes" the on button. Otherwise it would "push" it immediately and it would do no good because the stove isn't booted up yet.

    It's pretty simple really, especially if buying the timer modules. I could probably sketch something up but couldn't scan it tuntil I get back to work the middle of next week.
     
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  3. Rishar

    Rishar
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    Dec 8, 2017
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    Sorry it took me so long to get back. I've done my share of electronic repair but never built my own circuit. If you could do up a diagram I would really appreciate it.
     
  4. Matthewt

    Matthewt
    New Member 2.
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    Oct 4, 2018
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    Loc:
    Mesick, MI
    Wow someone else did this too. I did the same thing useing a Ardunio mico controller. Only difference is my is inside the stove with a two wire themostate connection coming out. I also have a older 5500m in my basement the control board went out of that stove so i use a bigger micro controller to power that whole stove. Both stoves work great. But the 5500 is so much cleaner then the king. It did take a lot of work and experimenting to make it work. But i glad someone else figured how to hook a real themostate to a king stove.
     
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  5. Reallybichy

    Reallybichy
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    Jan 13, 2019
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    I wanted to ask that question if the stove is connected to the thermostat it will run according to the temp I set?
     
  6. tlc1976

    tlc1976
    Feeling the Heat 2.
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    Oct 7, 2012
    336
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    Loc:
    Northwest Lower Michigan
    It's been a long time and I'm no longer with the person who had that stove. If you connect a thermostat according to the manual, it will maintain the set temperature as long as the weather isn't too warm for the lowest heat range. If you modify the stove like I did, it will maintain the set temperature by cycling the stove on and off when the weather is too warm for the lowest heat range.
     
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