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25 pvdc test run

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by kenstogie, Oct 13, 2012.

  1. kenstogie

    kenstogie Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2012
    Messages:
    412
    Loc:
    Albany (ish)
    recently got a 25pvdc and this very morn i fired it up in the driveway. all appeared to be fine, top auger feeds, bottom one too, blower works etc, etc, which is great news considering the cost (free :)
    )
    i took the back plate off, vacuumed it out and took a look around and everything seemed good, more great news. :) i cleaned out the burn pot, sanded the outside down and gave it a fresh coat of high temp oven paint and it looks basically new.

    here are the questions i have as i am ready to install this baby

    -when i fired it up the exaust "air" seemed warmer than the blower air that goes into the room, is this normal? (i had nothing hooked up on the back, ie no exaust pipe nor outside air intake)

    -what maintenance should i be doing other than the general cleaning of everything i have already done??

    -i was lucky enough to ge the

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  2. kenstogie

    kenstogie Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2012
    Messages:
    412
    Loc:
    Albany (ish)
    -i was lucky enough to get all the vent pipes (minus the wall thimble) with the unit but should i reuse them???? (its a 2005 and i assume the vent pipes are too they all look to be in great shape on the outside but fairly dirty on the inside)

    many thanks :) :) :)
  3. SmokeyTheBear

    SmokeyTheBear Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2008
    Messages:
    12,228
    Loc:
    Standish, ME
    The exhaust air is a lot hotter than the air that will be sent into the room and it can exceed 400::F at the end of the stove exhaust pipe with no vent .

    This is true for just about every normally operating pellet stove.

    The trick is to have the exhaust be hot enough to carry all of the volatiles out of the stove before they can condense inside the stove and venting while removing enough heat to warm the area where the stove is.

    You are burning wood and that means there is creosote even though the pellets are very low in moisture content they produce creosote just like a wood log in a wood stove.
    kenstogie likes this.

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