45 degree elbows no longer meet code?

Jfk4th Posted By Jfk4th, Jan 29, 2010 at 6:48 PM

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  1. Jfk4th

    Jfk4th
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    I am trying to sell some Class A chimney pipe and double wall interior elbows, etc and a guy emailed me from Pennsylvania and said 45 degree elbows no longer meet code. True? False?
     
  2. Bobbin

    Bobbin
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    Are you sure you don't mean 90 degree elbows? 45 seems awfully tight... I don't think I've ever seen one.
     
  3. Fsappo

    Fsappo
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  4. Jfk4th

    Jfk4th
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  5. begreen

    begreen
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    What type of pipe? No 45's are sold for class A, but ok for connector pipe.
     
  6. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood
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    compliments of simpson:

    http://www.duravent.com/docs/bulletins/2008/45_elbows_product_bulletin.pdf

    45-Degree Elbows are NOT Allowed in U.S. All-Fuel Chimney Systems
    The Issues
    • A 45-degree elbow in any U.S. all-fuel chimney installation does not comply with UL 103, the standard for factory-built
    chimneys in the U.S.
    • A 45-degree elbow in any U.S. all-fuel chimney installation does not comply with the International Building Code.
    • The language of NFPA 211 can no longer be used to justify 45-degree elbows because the International Building Code requires
    factory-built chimneys to comply with UL 103.
    • Building inspectors, especially in International Building Code jurisdictions, should be aware of the applicable governing
    documents and not allow chimney installations with 45-degree elbows.
    • In the event of chimney fires, homeowners, inspectors and fire/casualty insurers should be aware of non-compliant
    installations.
    • Distributors, dealers, and installers can be held liable for providing or installing non-compliant components. Chimney
    manufacturers do not have authority to override these governing documents.
     
  7. Jfk4th

    Jfk4th
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    OK I'll explain more and we can all breath easy ;-)

    I am selling Class A chimney pipe and 45's double wall interior stove pipe, so 45 degree double wall pipe is still OK
     
  8. Bobbin

    Bobbin
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    Interesting how the image I had in mind was of pipe with a much more acute angle (less than a right angle, or 90 degrees); the linked image is what I'd consider an obtuse angle and more in the range of 135 degrees. I couldn't imagine why you'd need an angle tighter than 90 degrees, lol, and I could understand why something like that wouldn't be "to code", lol.
     
  9. Jfk4th

    Jfk4th
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  10. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran
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    Why, I don't know, but apparently the degree of bend is measured from vertical. That is, think of clock hands at 6:00, then measure degrees from vertical as the minute hand moves forward: first 30 degrees, then 45, then 90, etc.
     
  11. Bobbin

    Bobbin
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    How an angle is measured really does depend on the point of origination. I work with fabric and cut bias binding for cording on slipcovers and upholstery. Bias is always 45 degrees to the grain of any woven fabric. I also do a lot of stencil work and geometric layouts on floorcloths. It all involves geometry and again, it's a question of perspective.

    I learned something new today. So it won't be a "wasted day"! Thanks.
     
  12. chad101

    chad101
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    whoooa! Maybe I'm not understanding this correctly...

    So my install is not up to code?
     

    Attached Files:

  13. raybonz

    raybonz
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    That looks like it would restrict the exhaust with 2 close 90's.. I would think 2-45's would be much less restriction and also make the stovepipe sturdier and easier to clean..

    My 2 cents,
    Ray
     
  14. Archie

    Archie
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    I'm curious too. Sounds like 45 is a no go inside the chimney, but OK for connector, like from the stove to the chimney pipe.
     
  15. fossil

    fossil
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    Exactly. 45° elbows are no longer approved for Class A chimney installation. No problem in single-wall or double-wall connector pipe (stovepipe). For Class A, you can buy 15° elbows & 30° elbows, but not 45°'s. Rick
     
  16. Jfk4th

    Jfk4th
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    Well I guess this post was not too bad then to do overall

    I originally wanted only to ask if 45's for connector pipe was still up to code but thanks to you guys additional info was given for the Class A chimney pipe. Thanks again :) to all and I am sorry if I initially confused people when I said Class A chimney pipe and elbows in the same sentence.

    I am hoping to get a little bit of money for the the 3 sections of 3 foot Class A chimney pipe, my double wall 45's connector pipe, and my adjustable double pipe, Plus I have roof brackets too. I hate to get rid of this but it just sitting in my garage taking up space and I can't find any use for it. I am charging a cheap price for each item so hopefully I will get rid of this fairly quickly
     
  17. tcassavaugh

    tcassavaugh
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    can those 2 x 90s be adjusted into 2 x 45s...might allow bwtter positioning foe the stove in the pic.

    cass
     
  18. jtp10181

    jtp10181
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    Pipe looks legal I guess, but why? 45 elbows would be a lot better.

    Also, side clearances on the right looks pretty small, does that meet specs for that stove?
     
  19. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa
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    I would offset with tow 15 degree elbows.

    In my former home I had to offset the class A pipe with two 45 degree elbows. 5 years later I sold the house and built my current one. At some point within that 5 years, the 45 degree elbows were taken off the market but I had the chimney inspected by a WETT certified sweep before I sold the house and there was no mention of the 45 degree elbows. I'm guessing they were grandfathered in.

    On my current home I only needed a small offset so a pair of 15's did the trick.
     
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