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A whole nuther use for a round

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by begreen, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  2. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    BG thats really cool. What would make it even better is if that round was oak, apple, or pecan. Because you could use all those shavings for the smoker or put them in a foil pouch and throw them on yer grille burner when yer cookin steaks.......MMMM..... I use my lathe to make apple chips from firewood splits all the time, I should video me doing that some time. That stuff smells great when you are turning it on the lathe... On a serious note, how long do you figure it would take the light to dry that shade out and split it? I will say one thing, that looks really neat seeing all the grain and knots with the light behind them.....thanks for sharing!
  3. golfandwoodnut

    golfandwoodnut Minister of Fire

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    Cool, but I would think there must be an easier way. That is a lot of wood to shave for such a thin result. I do like the end result as long as it doesn't crack when it dries out.
  4. Hass

    Hass Minister of Fire

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    "Making of a wooden lampshade, debris reused for other purposes."
    Sounds like he does :S
    One heck of a round to waste if not ;p
  5. WoodpileOCD

    WoodpileOCD Minister of Fire

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    Super cool. Not in a million years would I dream of using a round like that. Thanks for posting.
  6. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    Probably not too long but maybe you could oil or clear-coat it...
  7. fishingpol

    fishingpol Minister of Fire

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    That is a good video. It is very dangerous turning large blanks like that and requires some skill. Here is a link to a site that I put up a few months ago. This fellow is in NH that does the same. They are quite stunning.

    http://woodshades.com
  8. mywaynow

    mywaynow Minister of Fire

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    My first thought was splitting is going to ruin a lot of effort, and quickly. Here is an excerpt from FPs post regarding the finish:

    "I use a fine-tooth saw to cut through the thin wall at the narrow end and set the shade aside to dry completely. This process takes only a day or two, whereupon I resand the shade with 400 grit, and prepare the shade to mount on a base. Three coats of a polymerizing rubbed-oil finish are applied, now sanding with 1500 grit between coats. This finish is permanent, and never needs to be renewed."

    He also makes some guarentees that indicate a lack of concern regarding splitting. Definetly a pleasure to see the ingenuity of man, and the talents gained by those who strive to be the best they can. I often take time while on jobsites to watch specialty contractors at work. Stone masons usually get my attention. I am fortunate to be able to find myself in homes that are 5 million and up construction projects. You don't get run of the mill craftsmen on those jobs.
  9. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Apple (and cherry to a lesser degree) can be worked very thin on a lathe when green.Some years back I made a few smaller bowls & vases from both.Apple worked down to a wall thickness of 1/8" or a bit less can be 'shaped' with the hands almost like clay.It has a very high shrinkage rate due to its high density & normally twisted,knotty & leaning branches under tension.Warps readily & will split badly when drying,though sealing end grain or entire roughed out piece with melted wax slows it down.

    If its green,with very sharp gouges then a round nosed scraper followed by sanding up to 320 grit you can feel it getting warm.Stop,seal it and or place it in tightly closed plastic bag with some dry shavings then wait a few days to watch the rim of the bowl or vase distort.Do this quick or it'll firm up & it wont take any hand pressure without breaking.
  10. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Amazing. That is one hobby that I would like to get into (albeit scaled down). That dude has some skillz.
  11. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Very good craftsmanship. Nice equipment too.
    Pellet guys want the tailings to make pellets :)
    Good one :)
  12. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    That's awesome and looks beautiful - thanks for posting! I think I could at least do the chainsaw part............ :cheese: Cheers!

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