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Adding aquastat to EKO

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by hartkem, Sep 23, 2012.

  1. rkusek

    rkusek Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the info. A 120V N.O. valve and the 120V version of the A-419 looks like the ticket. Did you use any thermal grease? Would it be wise to use a rubber stopper, cork with a hole, etc. to hold the probe in place. I remember my dad having something like silly putty but I think it was for electrical purposes. Since I think it was rubber insulation that would work too but I don't know what it was.

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  2. Fred61

    Fred61 Minister of Fire

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    Depends how old your dad was. I'm old enough to have some babbitright laying around. If you're 50 years old or younger you probably never poured your own bearings. It was a material we called Monkey dung which worked like clay to form a dam that kept the babbit from running out. I have used this heat proof material to plug several leaks on high heat applications
  3. hartkem

    hartkem Member

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    I can't seem to find a one inch, 120 volt, normally open, sweat connection, zone valve.
  4. hartkem

    hartkem Member

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    Im looking at the L6006 aquastat. Does it require a power supply to operate or is it mechanical? Are most aquastats mechanical? I see the A419 is powered by 120 or 24v. Are aquastats the same way?
  5. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    The force that makes or breaks the connection is mechanical, powered by the temp probe and (presumably), expanding fluid or liquid metal in the probe and connecting line pushing the contact points together or apart. But since every aquastat is a switch, it's also an electrical gateway--usually, in my experience, 120V.
  6. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    A normally open zone valve requires a power supply to keep it closed during normal operation. The aquastat just goes in the power supply line between your breaker panel, and the zone valve, and acts like an automatic switch. So yes it needs a power supply, but it's the same one that your NO zone valve would use.
  7. hartkem

    hartkem Member

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    Ok thats they way I thought aquastats worked. Since I didn't understand them I purchased this thermal switch from mcmaster carr. I use it to interupt the thermostat 24v signal to my forced air heat circuit board when my storage temps are low. I have a problem with the switch short cycling or bouncing between open and closed when its changes switch state. Im hoping the A419 or aquastat will work a lot better.
    • Temperature Switches & Controllers
    Cartridge-Style Adjustable Temperature Switches

    [​IMG]
    Control the temperature of your tank or process by incorporating one of these switches. They are suitable for nonvibration applications located away from the heat source. Simply turn the adjustment screw to change the actuation point within the temperature range. Probe housing is Type 304 stainless steel. Switches have two 8" long wire leads with fiberglass insulation. Accuracy is not rated. UL recognized. Switches with a 5/8" cartridge OD are also CSA certified.
    Turns "on" to "off" switches are single pole, single throw (SPST), set to turn one circuit from "on" to "off" (normally closed) at your actuation point.
    Turns "off" to "on" switches are single pole, single throw (SPST), set to turn one circuit from "off" to "on" (normally open) at your actuation point.
  8. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    The aquastat has a differential (some set at 5°, some you can adjust between 5-30) that should stop short cycling. If you set one to say open your zone valve at 190, and have your diff set for 10, it would close it when the temp drops to 180.
  9. Fred61

    Fred61 Minister of Fire

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    The A419 has an "anti short cycling" delay mode which is adjustable.
  10. rkusek

    rkusek Minister of Fire

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    http://www.johnsoncontrols.com/cont.../temperature/electronic2/a419singlestage.html
    This should answer all your questions. The anti cycling can be from 0 to 12 in 1 minute increments. This is "on top" of the normal differential that is also adjustable. The A-419 is nice because of the digital temp display and the possibilities with the settings because it is electronic. It does require either 24v, 120v, or 240v to operate while the Honeywell mechanical versions do not. The Honeywells are proven for sure and the differential on them should take care of any short cycling I would certainly think. The A-419 seems to also be very reliable from what I have read about and experienced.
  11. hartkem

    hartkem Member

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    Thanks for all the good info. I went ahead and ordered the aquastat for boiler overheat protection and the a419 to control my storage tank temperature lockout. Im sure it will work better than the switch im currently using. Unfortunately I paid 70 bucks for it which is more than the a419 is.
  12. timberr

    timberr Member

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    Hartkem,

    What size copper fin tube did you use and how many feet? What is the output of your boiler? Have you tested this setup and were you satisfied w/ your results?

    Thanks
  13. hartkem

    hartkem Member

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    I used 3/4 copper fin tube. My boiler is an eko40 which i believe is 140k btu. I have 24 feet of fin tube mounted above and I haven't tested it. I guess I could pull the plug on the boiler to test it but then I couldn't watch the controller temp to make sure it doesnt over heat. I guess I could use a infared gun somewhere on the water jacket.
  14. timberr

    timberr Member

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    Thanks, I have a bunch of fin tube left over from upgrading my baseboard. 30 feet makes a nice loop but I am really curious how this will work, guess I will do it and check.

    Thanks for the info.

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