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Any advice on Metal Buildings??

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by tkirk22, Mar 30, 2008.

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  1. tkirk22

    tkirk22 New Member

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    I'm planning to build a 2400sf workshop. It's main use will be for metal working so there could be flame and sparks flying around. It's also going to be built on expanding clay soil. For those reasons I'm leaning towards a metal building rather than a cement block or a pole barn type building.

    This will be my last shop so I want it to be efficient within reason and relatively comfortable.
    I plan on running radiant heat tubes in the slab and insulating the walls and roof with 4" and 6" insulation. Also, I may decide to put ceramic insulating paint on the roof (If the stuff actually works). A 3 foot roof overhang on the south side will screen the south wall from the summer sun.

    For the type of metal structure, I'm leaning towards an I-beam frame work rather than a welded angle iron and bar truss system.

    Does anyone have advice on the companies that manufacture engineered steel buildings? Or any other knowledge for that matter? Good, bad or ugly?

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  2. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Nothing specific, but if you have any sort of good southern exposure, I'd look at trying to incorporate some sort of solar heating into the building... I like Builditsolar.com as one of the better sources I've seen for DIY solar stuff. I'm not convinced that PV is cost effective yet for most of us, though WV ought to be better than MA in that regard. However it would seem quite possible to use solar as a primary source for driving your radiant slabs, and doing other heating... (W/ firewood for backup of course) The site I mentioned seems to have several ideas on how to incorporate solar into a building - which might cause you to want to do slight adjustments in your design.

    Gooserider
  3. tkirk22

    tkirk22 New Member

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    Thanks Goose. I am planning to use solar. I've been to that site before and it certainly deserves another look.

    The long side of the building will face south. I increased the roof pitch to get a better shot at winter sun for roof collectors. I haven't done a full solar survey yet because I'm still deciding on the exact location, elevation, and wall height. There are many small pines 20 feet to the south so that presents a small problem. I may just start transplanting some deciduous trees and whack the pines before they shade the collectors.

    I'm considering a vented thermal storage wall on the south side made out of dry stacked and filled concrete blocks. But I may just do something that incorporates the existing metal wall skin and make a thermosiphon system out of it like this: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Renewable-Energy/1985-01-01/Tap-The-Sun.aspx

    For the radiant slab heat, I'm hoping to score some old collectors on craigslist or build something using the roof panels as a base. I'd use a drainback system into a small storage tank.

    Then I'll put 4 to 6 skylights on the north roof face.

    That's the plan at least. Things could change. Any advice or info?
  4. taxidermist

    taxidermist Minister of Fire

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    Take a look at the Kentucky steel truss buildings. I used to build these and they are easy to build and very good workmanship. I just built a wood polebarn and am kicking myself that I did not build a KST building.


    Rob
  5. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    Could you explain why? How do the prices compare?

    Thanks,
    Ken
  6. taxidermist

    taxidermist Minister of Fire

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    The reason I am kicking myself is what I think you want to know? The wood at todays lumber yards are crapp!!!!!!! I had to exchange so much wood to get my building half way straight. The treated post were so twisted and the rest of the wood was all split twisted and most had some bark still on the wood. The metal buildings are all straight and you can square up the building by tighting rods located in the brace bays. Also with the KST buildings you can buy great insulation for them and very easy to install. They come with a blue print and all parts are numbered. They also have bolt on brackets for pole free leantoos which makes it nice to drive in and out of. Check them out and they will send you a cataloge with all the prices and stuff.


    Rob
  7. tkirk22

    tkirk22 New Member

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    Thanks Rob. I'll check them out.

    I'm getting ready to start leveling the building pad. The big stumbling block at this point is how I'm going to get the roof beams in place. A full size crane won't fit on the site. I know there are smaller pickup truck mounted crane rigs but I can't find one. I'm thinking about making a loader bucket mounted crane.

    I should be able to find an all terrain forklift or a truck with a drywall delivery crane. Would one of those work?

    Have any bright ideas?
  8. taxidermist

    taxidermist Minister of Fire

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    If you rented a SKYTRAC or a manlift you could set the trusses easy. Or they have small boom trucks that would set them in no time. You just stand your legs up and then build your truss on the ground and stack them in order. Then boom in place and install every other perlin(the part the roof screws to) till all are set then go back and place the rest after the boom truck is gone.


    Rob
  9. tkirk22

    tkirk22 New Member

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    Thanks Rob,

    I'm not very familiar with this area and it's in the country so it's been a little hard to find things. I'll check into a manlift. I didn't realize they could lift the roof trusses.
  10. taxidermist

    taxidermist Minister of Fire

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    Depending on how big your building will be some will do it fine. Just dont tell them you are using it to lift stuff they dont like you to use it as a crane.


    Rob
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