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Axe for 8 year old

Post in 'The Gear' started by RORY12553, Apr 3, 2012.

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  1. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    8 year old is always wanting to split wood with me but the axes I have are way to heavy...figuring i would get him the fiskars x15 and let him split some smaller stuff with it...any other idea? this would be under very strict supervision too...looking for something light enough that would actually split some straight stuff

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  2. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Consider the X25 - it is still a short handle and fairly light head, but it will actually have some splitting power for rounds. The X15 is gonna be a hard swing to split rounds in my opinion.
  3. John_M

    John_M Minister of Fire

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    It would certainly be satisfying to have an eight year old child help with the splitting. However, in my opinion 8 yrs old is a bit too young to be handling sharp and heavy (to him) implents even while under the supervision of an adult. I am reminded of an incident about one year ago: Police officer took his 8-10 year old child to a firing range to learn shooting a 9mm Uzi. Child was told no matter what happens, he had to keep the barrel facing down range at all times. However, while on automatic fire the young boy turned around and accidently killed his father's sargent. ;sick <> 'nuf said!

    SOME eleven and twelve year olds MIGHT be able to handle the responsibility of using sharp and potentially dangerous tools and other implements.
  4. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    At 8 yrs old, my nephew was driving a 4x4 $150,000 tractor and two wheel grain cart to load semis after following the combine around the fields to fill. He could back that rig up better than most hired hands could. Just say'in that I believe it is more child to child than an "age" thing.

    at age 3 (my grandson, he could drive it like a pro. The little one in the wagon was 2):

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  5. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    I use the X25 and the handle would be way to long for him to use being he is half my height. considering the x 11 or the x 17 ...realized the x 15 is a chopping axe...most he would be doing is making pieces that i already split smaller...like small splits to pack the stove better

    I'm not teaching the kid to shoot a gun and understand what you are saying...he uses a hammer like a pro as well as many other tools so this is something that he would learn to use.

    i agree it is a child to child thing...if he could reach the peddle in the car i would let him drive...he has a quad and drives it better than most adults
  6. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Kool - that is the part I was concerned with. Don't bring a wrecking ball when a hammer is the right tool.
  7. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    Maybe i should send him out to you for summer vacation...kid loves tractors & anything to do with tools and dirt! Brought home some rounds last night and he was asking if he could move them! told him thank you for the offer but some weight more than you do!
  8. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Trust me, with two grandsons at home I am at my limit.
  9. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I started splitting around that age and did not have supervision. I had watched my father and brothers doing it and saw no reason I couldn't do it too so just started. It was a simple single bit axe and if that was not enough, then the sledge and wedges did the trick.
    pen likes this.
  11. FanMan

    FanMan Feeling the Heat

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    The old "official" Boy Scout hatchet is a good choice, too. I don't know if they make them any more but I see them from time to time at flea markets. Nice curved handle and a good feel, and it was designed for kids. I started with my Dad's old Scout hatchet. I wish I knew where it is now...

    As others have said it depends on the child, it's not an age thing... I taught my daughters to handle firearms safely and shoot when they were 6 or 7 (BB guns at first, then .22, moving up as they got older). By the time they were 8 I didn't have to worry about what would happen if they saw a gun somewhere and picked it up in ignorant fascination. When my younger daughter was 12 I bought her a single shot 20ga shotgun for her birthday so she could go deer hunting with me. She nad fun telling the kids at her city school about that!
  12. KodiakII

    KodiakII Feeling the Heat

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    How about letting them grow up a little first. Amazing the stories of very young kids driving farm implements and such, but wouldn't you feel like a real gobshyte if something happened (look up some old accident reports from farm accidents and kids, I know of sevral local ones off the top of my head) to the kid or a bystander. My son is almost eight, I have been teaching him safe gun handling since he was 5 (or a little earlier) with a bb gun and one of my .22's, but there is no way in hell I would ever let him handle an axe.
  13. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    I personally know of two kids killed while riding bikes. I know of one injury (death) of a kid in a farm accident. His father backed over him while he was playing.

    Look - I am not an advocate of pushing kids into the labor force or making them into something they are not. If you have a capable kid that has an interest, why not foster that interest. Beats Mario Brothers.
  14. Flatbedford

    Flatbedford Minister of Fire

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    Well said!
  15. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    Everyone has valid points. The 8 yr old wouldn't not be doing any lifting and would be basically making kindling or making smaller splits. Amazing that someone would rather there kid handle a firearm that could easily kill someone over an axe that when used properly would be a valuable lesson taught for years. Everybody is entitled to there own opinion and I'm not looking for any argument was just looking for opinions on a splitting axe that would be light enough and short enough for him to use to split a couple of 6-10'' rounds so that I could spend some time with him doing something we both have interest in. Thank you for those who stuck with the opening question.
  16. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    I know the kid is 8, but there can be a wide range in their strength and coordination at that age. I was pretty small, but wirey. I had no trouble swinging a maul (or running farm equipment) at his age. Take him to the local hardware store and see how much steel he can handle and base your decision on that....plus it would be super exciting for any little boy to go to the store with his old man to get his very own tool.
  17. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    He has swung the fiskars x 15 which is a chopping axe so that won't be what he will get. Figure the X 11 or the X17. He is a strong kid but will definitely not be doing any lifting etc. He loves going to Home Depot and taught him how to read a lot of words while we were there becasue it was what he was interested in.
  18. greg13

    greg13 Feeling the Heat

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    I can see both sides here. I have an 8 yr. old grandson that I might feel comfortable enough to give a single bit ax to split with, But I can still remember how it feels to hit your shin with one. I also have a 28 yr.old son that would scare the hell out of me with one.
  19. NH_Wood

    NH_Wood Minister of Fire

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    My 9 year old started wanting to split last year (when he was still 8) and I had him on my Fiskars X25. My main worry was the follow through to the ground if/when he missed the round. I have a large splitting block and made sure he set the round to be split as far back as possible and stand as near the splitting block as possible to reduce the chance of hitting his feet/legs. I had him on some nice straight grained red oak and he loved being able to see some nice splits building up. I'm with a lot of you - be as safe as you can but get the kids learning skills early. Cheers!
  20. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    You think there would be a big difference between the x25 and the x17? it is 5" shorter
  21. pen

    pen There are some who call me...mod. Staff Member

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    This was shared with the site a few months back. I like the way this kid was able to get involved.

    [youtube]

    pen
  22. seeyal8r

    seeyal8r Feeling the Heat

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    awesome video. Much safer than swinging the hatchet himself. Bet he sleeps good at night.
  23. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    "I drive da 'bota tractor...." ==c
  24. chuckie5fingers

    chuckie5fingers Member

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    I agree wtih Jags comment about fostering an interest. My older 2 kids, 5 and 3 often come out and help me split. (task forsce 5 ton electric) and they know what to do. We discuss everytime we go out about splitter safety and "watch where your fingers are. dont split until your brother/ sisters hand is out of the way....!!!"
    so for all of us out there, be safe and watch where your fingers are!!! :)

    chuck
  25. ISeeDeadBTUs

    ISeeDeadBTUs Guest

    I have no kids, so what I say is prolly worth less than what I normally say . . .

    seems to me that giving tasks - splitting wood or using a firearm - to a kid would depend on two things

    Physical strength/coordination, but also thinking ability. I think an adult that has never split wood before needs a lot of supervision in the beginning. From time to time I still misjudge physcis and nearly get hurt.

    Giving an automatic weapon to an 8-year-old was stupid. Go ahead, flame me.:ZZZ

    Like the videos on UTube where a petite woman fires a weapon and the recoil makes her lose control of the gun. Initially, it looks funny, but that's only because no one caught a bullet. Rather stupid, if ya think about it.

    :ZZZ:ZZZ:ZZZ

    If it were me, I'd be guiding the 8 year old with an axe very carefully until I thought he knew what he was doing. And I'd make sure to note when he shows signs of tireness, as that's when accidents happen.

    Don't let him run the 660 until he can start it himself>>
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