Big Oak split dry time

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by SolarAndWood, Oct 10, 2011.

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  1. SolarAndWood

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    I have been stacking the bigger Black Oak splits from my big scrounge of the year so far. I am tight on level accessible space and wondering how long I should plan on this stuff sitting here as I would like to block it in. 4 years seem right? Thinking I can get a couple Sugar Maple or similar rotations through before the Oak will be ready?
     

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  2. gzecc

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    I think your safe with 4 yrs. I hope you and I survive the seasoning process.
     
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  3. SolarAndWood

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    lol, at least this serves two purposes. The road is right on the other side and the stack should help with the noise. Much nicer to look at than those concrete barriers along the highways too.
     
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  4. Flatbedford

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    Those are some HUGE splits. Why so big? Oak may never season that big.
     
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  5. SolarAndWood

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    People always seem to be willing to give away the lessers, but I rarely get my hands on the good stuff. So, my new strategy is to make 8x8 - 10x10s out of the good stuff when I get it and set it aside as a long term investment for some cold January in the future.

    The rest of the stock dries for a couple years in the heap and goes straight to the burn shed.
     

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  6. Jags

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    Solar - a 10 x 10 block will take the same time as about an 11" round. How long would you season an 11" round? Will it ever properly season? My opinion would be to make 2 5 X 10" blocks. You will cut your seasoning time by 2/3 (approx). You might even start to notice some punk before it is properly seasoned in that big of chunks.
     
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  7. SolarAndWood

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    I would 4 way an 11 inch round and toss it in the heap.

    I have never seen split stacked wood punk if it was in a well ventilated dry location and was healthy when cut to begin with? I don't see any evidence in my current batch of over nighters but they are Locust, Beech and Maple and are under 20% after 3 years.

    I suppose the good thing about being a few years ahead is that an experiment failing isn't the end of the world.
     
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  8. Jags

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    Dats true. Might be interesting. The big difference is how Oak maintains its cellular moister when compared to many other varieties. It is pretty stingy. In a 10 x 10 block the cell damage that has to happen to allow the water to escape will increase exponentially when compared to a 5" or 8". In other words, a 10 x 10 block will take much longer than double the time of a 5 x 5 block.
     
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  9. SolarAndWood

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    My anecdotal uncontrolled experiment evidence from the Locust, Beech and Maple is that the big splits took half again longer than regular splits of the same wood/same time. These splits have bark on 1 side if at all from the time they are split. I know wood dries faster from the ends but I find the less bark on the exterior as a percentage the better. I split everything.

    I've got two and a half cord there...I'll report back in four or five years.
     
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  10. DanCorcoran

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    "I’ve got two and a half cord there…I’ll report back in four or five years. "

    What's the big rush?
     
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  11. SolarAndWood

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    No rush. I am thinking there is going to be a 100 ft windrow in front of it. Just considering stock rotation before there is 40 cord blocking it.
     
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  12. wooddope

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    Can't tell from pic, is itoff the ground? I also like big splits but fungus could be an issue with that pile.
     
  13. smokinj

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    Oh nothing a decade will not handle......That is an epa stove your running right? :cheese:
     
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  14. SolarAndWood

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    Stone on a pretty good grade. No fungus on this windy ridge even in the heap.
     
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  15. SolarAndWood

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    I'll take the under on that bet ;-) I'll see where I am after 3 years and decide whether to resplit it or not. Gonna need another 10 wire extension cord to get there though.
     
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  16. smokinj

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    As far ahead as you are its all good. On the other hand I have cut into old barn beams 100 years old. Still bet it would come in around 6-10 percent moisture.
     
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  17. bogydave

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    Very nice S&W
    I'm guessing you got it under control & it won't be a "compost" pile any time soon.
    Makes me wonder how oak would burn in Alaska, I mean some super long burn times. Just dreaming.
    Looks good to me.
     
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  18. Jags

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    Come on down a get some Dave. I'll trade ya pound for pound of Salmon. :cheese:
     
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  19. Flatbedford

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    I'll give you TWO pounds of Oak for each pound of Salmon.
     
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  20. SolarAndWood

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    If I pack the more moderate sized splits of the good stuff I have now in carefully, I can get pushing 100 lbs in the stove. With my 12 hour cold weather cycles, I figure I am in the 50-60K btu range over the course of the burn.

    With the big Oak splits I should be able to do 125 lbs. By the time the Oak is dry, I should have the house done. Between the two, I might just get 24 hour burn cycles in January.
     
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  21. Backwoods Savage

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    Solar, I realize what you have that stacked on but if you'd raise that at least 4" off the ground it would speed up the drying a lot. If you did that I would bet you could burn it in 4 years. As far as punk, I would not expect any on this but if it were in rounds then for sure there would be some punk.
     
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  22. SolarAndWood

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    What's the theory? That the water wicks up through the stone? I heard ya on the rounds. I split everything.
     
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  23. Backwoods Savage

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    No, the water won't wick up but if it is off the ground the air can get under the wood to help in the drying. It's all about air circulation.
     
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  24. SolarAndWood

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    Gotcha...we have no lack of circulation on this windy ridge.
     
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  25. Backwoods Savage

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    Windy or not, that wood should have air space under it to assist on the drying.
     
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