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Blaze king install....help!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by aansorge, Jun 10, 2013.

  1. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    That gal does not look 90, or what I would describe as a guy. It could be that the old guys figured it out though.

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  2. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, she ain't 90 yet! My wife cleans as I ripe everything apart...hasn't complained yet as she likes a hot house in the winter and she is as excited as I about the King. She even helped me cut about two cords a couple of weeks ago.

    The younger of the two old guys really helped out. He even helped me carry out the prefab fireplace and while not super heavy, it was still a decent load.

    Haven't been working much on the install this week as I had two days of autocross this past weekend and guests for another couple of days. I did clean up the Mendota gas stove as a buyer is coming for that tomorrow.
  3. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    I have the first layer of durock down and have purchased electrical boxes and such and have installed the OAK. Looking ahead, I'm looking at chimney details. Looking up my chase, I see this:



    I plan to install the firestop where the chimney will go through the ceiling, but do I need another firestop up top where there was a pre-existing metal ring from the old chimney? This is a two story house, but this is also a chase. The chase does shoot through the roof though.

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  4. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    The top ring is simply the top of the chase and where the chimney exits. It is the closer one I am wondering about. It will be a PITA to get up in there if I have to, but of course I'll do it if necessary.
  5. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Installed the firestop at the 2nd floor, built the support box, installed hardibacker to cover insulation in chimney, lowered the ceiling in the chase to meet clearance codes, and did a lot of caulking in the chase to keep my daughters room warm.

    The firestop was tough as the chase gets narrow up top. After wasting hours trying to drill and screw it in, I finally borrowed a nail gun and did it in half an hour tops.

    Next is durock install and better insulating the ceiling.

    Attached Files:

  6. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    The Durock is up... I'll patch a few gaps now with thin-set mortar.

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  7. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Alright, another question...my clearances to combustibles just meet code. It will have the 9 inches on either side to combustibles( durock over the top of the wood) which is the minimum, and about 7 to 8 inches to combustibles in back (less to the durock, Roxul under the durock on the back) whereas 6 inches is minimum. I was thinking of adding a heat shield simply for safety. Do you think I should bother?
  8. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Is there minimal 2" clearance inside that chase? Tough to tell from the pics.
  9. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Yes. The opening you see is to hold the ceiling support box (which supports the chimney). This opening is normally at minimum as built to spec for the support box. After that box, it gets wider. I climbed up and down that sucker about 50 times prior to putting in the support box, so I know it is big enough for an average sized male ( 24 by 24 inches actually).
  10. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    The guy I work with actually was able to fit through the 12x12 hole for a 6" support box!! I didn't think it was possible, but he did it. _g
  11. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Just be sure to trim that OSB back even with the framing, you'll will need to do that anyway so the box can be pushed up far enough. I'm sure that was the plan, just making sure.
  12. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    I'm lost....

    The hole in the ceiling is a box frame that the chimney support slides up into. I then reach up inside and screw it to the 2 by 4's. I don't think any trimming needs to be done, but correct me if I'm wrong. The sides of the chimney support box are 14 inches and therefore meet code.
  13. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

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    Yes, but your photo shows a circular cutout in a bit of osb or ply lying right above the framing for the support box. That has to go.
  14. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Ah...

    The angle of the photo makes it look questionable, but in reality, it is well outside the combustible zone. I may trim it back a little farther though, just to be safe. Thanks for the tip.
  15. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Making progress...

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  16. Fiamma

    Fiamma Member

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    Im Impressed at how quickly you got this done, Looks like I went to bed and you finished it when I woke :)
    Did you work through the night?

    The Blaze King ( King ) is one of the best and longest burning stoves on the market, Use it properly and you'll have no problems at all.
    In that confined area I would defiantly add a heat shield spaced with an air space.
    The king is one hot stove! Keep the blowers on, it is part of the stove shielding.
  17. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Yes, even though I meet code as is (just!) I will be adding shielding. Of course I have the side shields on the stove as well.
  18. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    I have done all the work myself up to the finish you see above. The finish above is a concrete finish. I thought about tiling which of course is more typical, but my Enerzone has the same concrete finish and we really like it. Also, the concrete finish was done while my family and I were on vacation so I was able to make progress before Fall even while going to Disney.

    Next stop is the stove. While in good shape overall, I am adding a fresh cat, a door gasket, a bypass gasket, and a coat of paint. I did the door gasket two days ago, today I'll be cleaning up the stove and painting.
  19. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    A fresh coat if paint makes such a difference! Blaze King used Stove Bright Satin Black on their stoves until recently. If you want it to look like a late model, use Metallic Black. They switched to that a little while ago.
  20. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    The stove manufacturer tested this thing and listed the clearances to combustibles. You can build that enclosure out of balsa wood if you want so long as it is outside of the required clearances. Don't feel like you must do anything special to the walls. It's extra. Won't hurt but is not required. We get a lot of people on this site that erroneously go to great lengths to build wall shields that accomplish nothing but looking good and making them feel safer.
    keninmich likes this.
  21. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Stove is painted. I used rustoleum high heat as I already had a brand new can at home.

    Now I am debating on whether or not to install a heat shield as I have two conflicting opinions above. It all meets code but just barely. Then again I think the heat shield would take away some of the aesthetics.

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  22. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    I have 6" behind my stove to the paper of the sheetrock. Just what do you think minimum clearance to combustibles means?

    [​IMG]
  23. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    Good point high beam, and I just talked to Blaze King directly and they said the same thing...I'll skip the extra shielding.

    I did just find out one bit of bad news; one of the sections of chimney pipe that came with this deal is a different brand than all the other sections. Therefore I need to order another 2 ft of chimney. Rats.
  24. Fiamma

    Fiamma Member

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    If you spoke to Chris at BK, he is The Man !
    He is one of the nicest, and smartest people I've met.
    Were also good friends,
    The rear of the stove is the coolest part because the casing for the fans acts as a sheild.
    The sides ( if a parlor ) are the hot spots.
    If you used durock it has perlite mixed in it, so it is a great insulator as well.
  25. aansorge

    aansorge Minister of Fire

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    I forget the name of the woman I talked to but it wasn't Chris. She seemed very knowledgeable though. It is a parlor and does have the side shields. And yes, I used Durock.

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