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Buck Stove Fan Noise

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by block, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. block

    block New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Ohio
    About to pull my stove for the third time. Have rewired it and put in new blower motor. I think the fan balde is out of balance and causing at low pitch rumbling noice which drives me nuts at night. Also it cant be good for the life of the motor. Anyone else delt with this before? Planing on hanging the blade on stick and manualy balance it. Will post results in about an hour.

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  2. block

    block New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Ohio
    Bent a few of the blads to make make them all the exact same posotion. Laid it flat on a table to make sure they are all even. Put it all back together and still getting the vibration noise at high speed. At lesat I can run the blower at half speed with no noise. Anyone else ever had fan noise issues?

    290 Farmboss
    Huskey 22 ton spitter.
  3. ROBERT F

    ROBERT F Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Messages:
    547
    Loc:
    CENTRAL COLORADO
    Possible that the fan itself is out of balance. usually a few little metal clips on the blades to cancel out heavy/light spots. over time, the mounts loosen and can cause weird sounds. creaking, rubbling, rythmic noise. is all sheilding and mounts around stove tight? every fan will have a harmonic distortion point. trying to get it above the speeds that your fan opperates is the key.
  4. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    3,862
    Loc:
    NNJ
    Which model buck is this?
  5. boatboy63

    boatboy63 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    188
    Loc:
    Northeastern TN
    I have a model 27000 Buck Stove insert from the early 80's. The fan is on the outside back of the firebox. Problem with this setup is that you have to pull the stove out of the fireplace, manage to swing it around, and dodge the dried creosote flakes that come from the heavens, all in the same motion. With the fan being where it is, it is highly susceptable to overheating and causing damage to motor. About 2 winters ago, I started noticing a metallic noise occasionally when the fan was on high. I hoped it would make thru the season. The noise got worse thru the season, but it did make it. Before the next season, I had a new motor, fan, and thermostat waiting on it. Changed it before heating season and am still running on it now. All in all, I was out around $200 for all the parts. Seems the motor was around $100, fan about $25, and thermostat was about $80.

    All the newer and improved inserts have fans mounted on the front of the units to keep them from getting too hot and overheating. This takes the room air and passes over the motor/fan instead of old school of pulling air thru the unit (which heats in the process), passing it over the motor/fan, and ducts it back to the front of the unit.

    Sure, when these stoves first came out, they really put out the heat. By today's standards, they are more of a fire breathing toe warmer. If I could do it all over, I would have taken the $200 spent on parts and applied it toward a new EPA insert. My model Buck Stove is around 30,000 BTU. Northern Tool has a similar model made by Century that is EPA approved and rated for 65,000 btu. The price on it is around $750 right now and it qualifies for the 30% tax rebate. If you took the $150 you are about to spend on your stove along with the tax rebate savings, you would be around $350-400 out of pocket for a unit that will put out twice the heat and use about half the wood. Not to mention, the fan is on the front of this model so it should last much longer.

    BTW, if you do go this route, beware of the Drolet version that says it is rated at 60,000btu. According to the owner's manual, it is only 35,000 and the same label is on the door, according to someone who posted feedback for that model.
  6. rdc500

    rdc500 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Loc:
    East TN
    I could not agree more. I have a Buck 27000 free stander and it is a wood hog. It does throw a bunch of heat but at 35,000 btu's there are more efficient models on the market. Now I have to say I like the fan it does a good job spreading the heat and I have 2100sf ranch and it still does a good job, but if you have to buy wood I don't see much savings. After this season I will be trading it for a good efficient model with a fan. :)

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