1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

building a wood stove

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by rdgirls, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. rdgirls

    rdgirls New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    eastern md
    Look-in for some help figuring out a problem with the wood stove I just built out of a old water heater. How I built it was I, cut the bottom out and welded flat steel to it, then I cut in a prefab door kit and a 6" pipe for exhaust. The problem is draft, anytime, when I light it, burn it or open the door smoke comes out the door. When I installed the 6" pipe I cut a whole, inserted the pipe and welded around it, the pipe sticks down on the inside about 5/8". The stove is also not getting enough air to burn either, if I crack the door it burns hard and I can close (slide) the door vent and cut the air off and kill the fire, with the door cracked. The door has a seal around it, I was thinking of removing it and trying that, allowing it to get more air.

    The stove is setting in the drive way now for testing before I install it, I have tried it with 7 ft of pipe straight up and a 90 deg bend. Am I having these problems because of the outside air temp no natural convection?

    Thanks for any help you can give me, been reading this forum for a long time and you guy's are great.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,690
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Well you know we are going to want pictures...

    It does sound like a draft issue, but it could also be that the wood is not well seasoned. Have you tried burning construction scraps or pallets in it?
  3. rdgirls

    rdgirls New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    eastern md
    Wood is a yr old, covered and dry I have burned 2x4's in it same thing. I am testing it like I said outside in the open, would it burn different out in the open and not in a building. I'm thinking equal pressure between the intake and outlet? I have never burned a stove outside before, could it be that the cold air the stove is taking in is the same air where it go's out?

    I tried to post a pic. but it wouldn't post to large to many pix any suggestions? how do you reduce the size?
  4. rwhite

    rwhite Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2011
    Messages:
    631
    Loc:
    SW Idaho
    How much pipe do you have on it for the test? It needs the right amount of pipe to pull the smoke out.
  5. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,086
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Gonna take more than seven feet of pipe to establish a draft.
  6. rwhite

    rwhite Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2011
    Messages:
    631
    Loc:
    SW Idaho
    [quote author="rwhite" date="1327800240"]How much pipe do you have on it for the test? It needs the right amount of pipe to pull the smoke out.[/quote

    Missed the part about the 7'. +1 on what BB said.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,690
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Here's some info on resizing pics. I

    For better draft there should be no turns in the pipe. Just go straight up. If you can safely attach another 4 ft of pipe, that should help. Be sure to brace the pipe with a safe, non-combustible strut or guy wires, even if temporary.
  8. rdgirls

    rdgirls New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    eastern md
    I have 8 ft of 6 in pipe with a 90 deg on the end, figured out the pic.

    Attached Files:

  9. rdgirls

    rdgirls New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    eastern md
    anyone know the formula for figuring draft?
  10. fox9988

    fox9988 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    581
    Loc:
    NW Arkansas
    I repainted my stove and did a burn to cure the paint in the driveway recently. With no pipe it basicly wouln't burn(no suprise). With 6 ft and it barely burned hot enough to cure the paint- poor draft. After final install with a 16 ft flue, it drafts fine.
  11. Redbear86

    Redbear86 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2011
    Messages:
    149
    Loc:
    SE Idaho
    i got the air compressor out and blew air through the door vent to cure mine, create my own draft like a forge
  12. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,690
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I don't follow why the 90 on the end. Get rid of the elbow and try it. If that doesn't work, jam in some cheap galvanized duct pipe (for testing purposes only!).

    Draft calculations. There's a couple calculators on this site. Note what happens to draft when the outside and inside temps are equal.

    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/natural-draught-ventilation-d_122.html

    To induce draft while it is outside, so that you can burn off the oils on this tank, put a box or table fan a few feet in front of the intake.
  13. rdgirls

    rdgirls New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    eastern md
    Thanks for all the helpful info, I extended the pipe a bit, left the door cracked to get it burning. When everything got good and hot it seems to burn pretty go. Today I cleaned it off and painted it, now it's burning to cure the paint. Yesterday I did remove the door seal and it helped the burn, I will replace it when it's installed.

    Thanks alot for all the help! I will let you know what happens when I get it in.
  14. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,690
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Did you weld a baffle inside? With those capped off ports I was wondering if you considered adding some secondary air for cleaner burning.

    Where's this going into? Will it have the required 36" clearances?
  15. rdgirls

    rdgirls New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    eastern md
    no baffle, do you think it needs on and where should it be? I had the door kit setting around so I decided to use it. I was going to make my own door, install a 2" pipe in the bottom with holes drilled in it, in the end cap would be a large hole and a slide to regulate the air.

    Clearance not going to be a problem going in my shop, cement floor and brick wall.
  16. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,690
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If you would like to consume less wood while spilling less smoke, making this stove more efficient is a win-win proposition.
  17. rdgirls

    rdgirls New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2010
    Messages:
    10
    Loc:
    eastern md
    I looked into different ones it seems like to me withthe pipe comming out at the top the best way to install a damper would be to weld it along the top the smoke would travel along the top to the front of the stove then enter the baffle moving to the back and out the pipe? Would this work okay with the intake vent in the front?

    I guess I would need a bypass of some sort for start up?
  18. Locust Post

    Locust Post Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2012
    Messages:
    1,063
    Loc:
    Northeast Ohio
    You would not need the baffle the full lenghth above the firebox area just for instance maybe half way. When you load the wood I would presume given the shape of this you would load north and south (wood longways not sideways across). If you rake your hot coals forward and load your wood to cover from side to side the air entering the bottom draft will have to travel under the wood to the back of the wood and then roll upward and forward to the end of the baffle. It is just to slow the air and keep it in the firebow a bit longer. If you wanted to add another air inlet at the top of the door you could crack it a little after the fire is going well This would hit that smoke also and disperse it back into the burn somewhat again. This is older secondary burn but does help the stove to be more efficient. If you really want to get creative you could add some secondary burn tubes. I won't get into explaining that but if you seach secondary burn tubes you should find some threads that explain.
  19. valley ranch

    valley ranch Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    409
    Loc:
    Ranches in Sierra Nevada mts,Calif & Nevada
    I'm wondering about the 6" flu. Why wouldn't you use a 8"? That's a very good door you have on the stove.
  20. greythorn3

    greythorn3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2007
    Messages:
    997
    Loc:
    Alaska
    that looks great with the diamond plate endplate you welded on there, just extend that chimney and go for it!

Share This Page