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Burn times idea for overnight burns

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by fespo, Dec 24, 2012.

  1. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    Thats good to hear. Lot of effort goes into picking and installing a stove, it's good it's working for you. Colder weather moved in here, that and I'm home so I can burn round the clock. Stove has never been happier.
    corey21 likes this.

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  2. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    Here's a typical burn for me.
    Stove- Regency F2400, Chimney- 20 ft 6"SS, Wood- Lodgepole pine.

    Loaded up for the night (note wood is loaded North/South)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The temperature continued to rise to about 600 F after the wood was loaded, then the draft was closed completely and time shot was taken before going to bed.
    [​IMG]
    The night time temp outside was around 30 F (-1 C)

    Gone to sleep ZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzz

    Next morning
    [​IMG]
    Temperature in the stove room was over 80 F
    Lots of coals to start another fire, but house was plenty warm so we just open the draft and let the coals burn out.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    This was a typical overnight burn, if I wanted a longer burn I would let the initial fire burn hotter and more completely, then rake the coals forward and load the wood East/West. That will often give me another 2-3 hours till I need to reload, using the same wood.
  3. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    No pics...my current times sound like they suck but it's more of a wood "issue". We're still burning box elder we had to move for an outside project so it's got to get gone anyway. Splits are mostly small so they burn through fast. Usually load @ 9/10 pm and reload at 2/3am with a hot coals restart. I don't turn on the light for the middle of the night reload so I can't give stove top temps.
  4. Treacherous

    Treacherous Minister of Fire

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    I really can't get less than 10-12 hours with Douglas Fir and a single energy log. A second energy logs seals it for 12 hours of useable heat.
  5. Lumber-Jack

    Lumber-Jack Minister of Fire

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    Hey Fespo, you started this thread, where's you pictures???
  6. katwillny

    katwillny Guest

    Great idea, i will report tonight when i get home. On a full load of locust and maple, i normally get a decent 10 hours, 8 depending on outside variables.
  7. bag of hammers

    bag of hammers Minister of Fire

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    no pics here either, but fwiw I found the king of uglies while digging around in one pallet / stack this past weekend - great big gnarly knotted chunk of yellow birch probably about 3 years old - buried down in the middle of a pallet. I could see the remnants of my attempts to break this thing apart with the manual log splitter (10 ton) before giving up on it. That was a couple of years ago. After a bit of eyeballing and scratching my head (would it fit?) I loaded it onto a hot bed of coals sometime shortly after 1:00 a.m. or so. It just cleared the brick on either side of the firebox, with a couple inches to spare between the top of the knot and the tubes. I left the air open for a while, it was rolling along nicely, then started to shut it down until the primary air was about 95% closed - @ 2:00. Nothing but more coals @ 9:00 a.m. That was one tough chunk of wood, more than my splitter could handle, but I got my revenge on new years eve.... :p
    etiger2007 likes this.
  8. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    DO all of you have to keep your stoves going 24/7 to maintain heat? If temps are around 35 or more, i sometimes have to delay filling the stove until the evening hours. I still get a relight after 24 hours as the stove is still 100-200 top temp.
  9. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    I sometimes have to do like you as well but the stove is still warm so it ant much trouble at all getting back going as a cold start is.
  10. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    I do.

    It's more of a matter of how many stoves I need to run. My heat loss is quite high and this old house will never be as efficient as a modern home. Over the next five years it will be interesting to see how additional insulation, better windows, and new doors effect the heat output and burn times of the stoves.
  11. coldkiwi

    coldkiwi Member

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    I put 2 large oak splits on a bed of coals in the revere last night at 10 ,room was 73, got up at six and the room was 67.5.The coals were still more or less the shape of the splits.
    BB, I installed new vinyl dual glazed windows in the house(1960 log cabin) made a real difference in keeping the heat IN the place overnight
  12. Seasoned Oak

    Seasoned Oak Minister of Fire

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    I only have 1 stove, but 3 floors so its a challenge to get that back bedroom on the third floor warm.
    I still have a few walls with zero insulation in this 100 Yr old house.Every thing i do here insulation wise was well worth the effort and has a positive effect on the houses ability to retain heat. Its a good thing my harman puts out every bit of its rated capacity of 75000 BTUs as thats the only thing running since Xmas and its about 25 outside.
  13. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, I know new windows and doors will make a big difference. But the $20-40k needed to replace all the windows and doors would also make a big difference in my bank account... negatively speaking. The changes will happen. Just not in the short term. It will take about five years to make it all happen.
  14. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    I think my back door is leaking a lot of air.:(
  15. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    Cheer up. I have seven doors leaking air.

    Oh, I've sealed them up as best as I can. Weather stripping, insulation tape, caulking, etc. But they all still leak somewhat. New doors are the answer.
  16. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    That is a lot of doors no wonder you have to keep more then one stove going.
  17. katwillny

    katwillny Guest

    As promised earlier, i came home and did a reload on coals from earlier this am. The stove was about 250 and some coals left from a load of maple and locust. Just loaded the stove with the same thing now plus a few small splits of birch. It got pretty warm pretty fast. I was chocking the air down as needed. Right now she is cruising at 600. Last picture should have been first on the order but yall get the idea.
    Morning Follow up
    Woke up this morning at 6:30 and the stove top was still at 375-400 and had a nice bed of coals and some solids forwards the back wall of the stove, that locust sure does burn nicely. Loaded the stove again and took right off. Off to the races at 650 in no time. by the way its 3 degrees out and 75 around the house. both stoves going.

    Attached Files:

    Lumber-Jack likes this.
  18. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    This is a much better than average performanceand I don't have good pics but I had to share...

    Last night I reloaded about 9pm. It was 20 out, 74 in and I had a lot of coals, at least 3in as the stove was still hot. I packed it full of heavy stuff - oak and maybe some hard maple, 5 or 6 big 20in splits with one shorty on top to fill within 1/2in of griddle. At a half hour had it shut down and cruising at 450 griddle/1150 cat temp on fully closed air. Stove room at 76.

    This morning at 6:30 its 22 out and 71 in stove room. Inside temp doesn't count because the central heat had kicked on overnight. But more important, stove is at 375 griddle/700 cat. Usually at this time I reload, but this time I opened the air and the temps shot up to 550 griddle/1300 cat burning off what's left of last nights load. I could probably get another 2 hours of usable heat!

    IMG_20130104_070145.jpg
  19. herdbull

    herdbull Member

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    On Weds. this week I made it 15 hours between reloads in the 30 and I still had a stove top that was at 280 degrees. I've been tinkering quite a bit with how it's loaded, maximizing the load size, minimizing the air flow and watching it heat up like a hawk and just having some patience with it. It's really starting to pay off.

    It might take a little more human input other than just opening the door, stuffing some wood in it and letting it burn but to me it's been well worth. Sorry, no pics as I'm usually gone all day (12 hours) for work and it never crosses my mind once I get home. If I get into a big burn this weekend I'll try and take some pics. I like the pics, it has shown me one thing and that is I think I can leave my splits bigger now that I have this stove. Most of you guys have at least one or 2 monster sized splits in your overnight loads. I currently don't have any that big :(.

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