1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Can a stainless liner be connected directly to wood stove?

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Neil-V1, Oct 7, 2011.

  1. Neil-V1

    Neil-V1 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    I have a Fisher wood stove and I am wondering if I can connect the stainless chimney liner directly to the back of the wood stove exhaust collar using screws? My existing stainless chimney liner does NOT have any insulation, it's just the steel liner running up the entire length of the chimney that is only ten years old. Should it be insulated or it that not needed? Looking for opinions. Thank you.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,015
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Is this rigid or flexible liner? Flex liner is too thin, it needs a stove connector piece between it and the stove.
  3. Neil-V1

    Neil-V1 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    Do you know what that type of connector is called? The liner is flexible stainless. I was planning on hooking it up using a couple of 6 inch clamps and also 3 or 4 screws. Thanks.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,015
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
  5. Neil-V1

    Neil-V1 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    I think what it is I may need is an Appliance Connector. Does that sound right? As I said plan WAS to hook up the liner using a coupler and attach the liner to the coupler using two clamps and screw it to the stove pipe coupler a few times and drive the screws right through the clamps themselves to insure it cant slip off in any way.

    My real concern is if the liner NEEDS to be insulated. We have a very new brick chimney with clay liners that run all the way from top to bottom. I am hoping I dont have to go out and buy an expensive insulation kit when our other wood stove was hooked up WITHOUT insulation. Do you think that I NEED to use the insulation? The chimney is like brand new and there will be a few inches of air space on all sides of the chiney liner that runs the whole length of the chimney.

    My last concern is when I hook the liner back up to the plate that has a clamp built into it at the top of the chimney is how much of the chimney liner sticks out above the plate with the clamp built into it? I was thinking like an inch or two. That sound ok? Thanks.
  6. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,442
    Loc:
    NE PA
    Insulated chimney = warm chimney. Warm chimney = better draft, less creosote, less cleaning.

    Insulated liners didn't exist when your stove was made, but he or she will love you for it. (you didn't mention the gender. (model)

    If there's no damper in your stoves future, you will have an extremely warm chimney. (not good) Some models require it, I couldn't imagine running one without it.

    A stove is a heating appliance. A stove connector IS an appliance connector.

    No opinions here, just the facts.
  7. Neil-V1

    Neil-V1 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    How often do you clean your liner? I have only had to clean mine once each year with our Avalon Stove hooked up directly to this liner. You are correct though, I should put a damper in. Our last stove was hooked up by a wood stove place and they had the liner hooked directly to the wood stove collar with screws and large clamps. I just did not want to have to drop an extra $300 bucks on an insulation kit being that our chimney looks like brand new still inside. I do however want it to be safe. I will end up running a short length of stove pipe so I can install a damper in it. It's a Papa Bear I think.
  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2007
    Messages:
    1,442
    Loc:
    NE PA
    I don't use the chimney connected to a wood stove in a conventional way. I heat with coal all winter with another chimney. But when wood is plentiful and I need to get rid of it, I like to set the coal fire back to a minimal burn just keeping it lit, to heat and cook with wood. I used to heat solely with wood, but that was with a Fisher Goldilocks. They have a baffle instead of the flue going straight out. This burns 90% of the smoke particles that would normally be released up the stack. I cleaned that one yearly. By keeping the flue interior above 250* ALL THE WAY UP, condensation of vapor and smoke particles is eliminated, not allowing creosote to form. It will form on a cold cap or cover since this exposed surface is chilled compared to the flue liner. I do heat with wood in the fall and spring when it's not cold enough to have a coal fire. However, I only burn Fisher's with a baffle. I heat 1850 square feet, so the first few fires are in a Baby Bear. It's more than enough on cool to cold nights. This year was only 3 nights with it. It's normally in my bedroom, as a night stand. My cat spends most of his time on, or in it. So when it's connected in the middle of my kitchen, he's a bit upset that his territory is gone. He then takes up residence on a Honey Bear, being a smaller stove as well. But he prefers the Baby. He has no interest in any larger stoves. So I've already switched to a Mama for October. (before he jumps on his Baby while it's going) Burning a larger stove slower to prevent over heating the house over night will create much more deposits. If I were to go to a Papa Bear, I'd have to burn it so low, it would build up rapidly. So if you can burn a hot fire, keeping the stack above 250* (insulation helps a lot) you won't need to clean near as often. So lower stove temps in spring and fall can cause rapid accumulation if you're using a large stove like the Papa Bear in a space under 2000 square feet. They are more suited for 2250 and up so you can burn them hard enough to stay clean. A 5/16 thick steel plate baffle on a 45* angle in front of the rear outlet opening creates a much hotter area in the vent space above the baffle (2" below the top) eliminating lots of cleaning. A choked off Papa without a baffle could require monthly cleaning, compared to yearly cleaning, burning it properly. The manual covers creosote formation on page 14.
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/wiki/File:Fisher_Manual.pdf/

    Attached Files:

  9. Neil-V1

    Neil-V1 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    Southeastern Massachusetts
    I ordered a stove connector from Chimney Liner Depot yesterday at 12 noon. I almost messed myself when the darn thing arrived TODAY before 12 noon. I have never seen service that fast....ever. Thanks for telling me about them. I will order from them EVERY time I need something. Thanks.

Share This Page