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Can single wall connector pipe be used as a liner?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by elkimmeg, May 14, 2006.

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  1. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    I forgot about this incident, which occurred during the time, I had a forced vacation from the forum. I was called in to inspect the wood stove, after a carbon monoxide incident had occurred. Most of the single wall galvanized pipe had disintegrated, but here is a picture of one that had not vanished completely. That’s right, he or someone, about 7 years ago decided to line the poor condition masonry chimney with single wall galvanized pipe. The existing pipe is so thin; it is hard to tell if it was 26 or 28-gage pipe.
    I did not have to spend a lot of time investigating as the fire dept had already found the evidence. An older gent lived in the home, real nice guy, he has recovered enough to be housed in a rest home, but will never return home. He had experienced periodic smoke but was tired of hearing the smoke alarm going off, so he removed the battery.
    No monoxide detectors present either

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Boy, that's pretty ugly. This appears to be an issue of corrosion due to improper pipe and not an issue of single wall pipe. The fault was using light-guage, galvanized, warm-air pipe, prolly 26ga instead of using approved stainless, single-wall, chimney liner like Saf-T-Flu. Is that correct? I think that single-wall approved for chimney liner pipe is ok at least in our state. It's what I pulled from our chimney and is in great shape.
  3. skypager

    skypager New Member

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    You are correct BeGreen. Many chimney manufacturers make both 304 or 316 Alloy 24 Gauge Stainless Steel rigid pipe which is approved for chimney relining. I don't know of any codes saying otherwise either, but it may need to be wrapped.

    However, the stuff is rarely used anymore. (at least in my experience). The reason its rarely used is it is very difficult to run if the chimney is not a 100% straight. Its tough to get this stuff around offsets as it is pieced together on the roof and fed down the chimney. However, they do make a "t" with a removable snout and clean out to get through wall thimble areas. It would more commonly be used with furnaces than wood inserts. Although in many cases it could be used w/ free standing wood stoves venting into a masonary flue.

    On the plus side - I would imagine that if it can be used it is better than corrugated flex pipe. The rigid pipe has a smooth interior as opposed to the lumpy, creosote grabbing corrugate, making it easier to clean. Doing a quick look in the price book, it appears to run about the same cost also. However, I would probably charge a little more for labor since there is more work involved.

    Heat-Fabs web site says it well:

    http://www.heat-fab.com/products/saftliner_desc.shtml
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Our chimney had plenty of wiggle room for an 8" pipe. It had about a 12 x 18 throat. Is there a way I can determine what type of stainless my liner is? It's only had 2 years of burning in it and looks to be in excellent shape, but I have no idea what to sell it for. I'm guessing it's 304L.
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    B green that is the very reason, I require such info during the permitting process. One call to my office and I can identify the manufacture model and details of the material. At times to make it easier, we just photocopy the first page or two of the manual.
    Have you called the building dept? If you were in my town, just drop by, we could photocopy any needed documentation we have.
    Really its our job to fully identify the products being installed and preserve them for public records.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The liner was installed by the chimney sweep. I doubt he documented anything. When we rebuild and install the new class-A chimney, it will get fully inspected and documented.
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