1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Canyon ST310 owners thoughts?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by charly, Jul 4, 2010.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. charly

    charly Guest

    Looked at a PE T6 model and then the Country stove, ST310. Fire brick was twice as heavy in the country stove. We owned a Country 210 model in our previous house, the owner is still using the stove 14 years later. It was great stove. I know alot of people like the Gentle Giant T6. Just trying to decide what to get. Guy said the firebrick won't last that long in the PE stove . They sell both stoves. Any thoughts would be appreciated, before committing to one.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,829
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Both are good stoves, but there are some pretty significant differences. The biggest difference of course is that one stove is cast-iron clad with an ingenious trivet system and the other is a straight, steel, step-top stove. That makes it a convective heater. If you need more radiant heat, get the ST310.

    The Canyon compares more to the Quadrafire 5700 steptop than to the Alderlea. PE chose a firebrick that has higher insulative value and keeps the firebox hotter. I consider this a plus. Eventually firebrick will need to be replaced, but as long as one is not loading the stove roughshod, it should be many years before the brick needs replacement. I would expect the baffle brick and blanket will need replacement much more frequently on the ST310 than with the closed system on the PE. Ask the dealer about the cost of replacing these items.

    Either stove will do a good job heating. Country stoves are built close by to us and have a good reputation locally. So go for the one you like the best. But compare cost with the Summit, which is also clad, but in less expensive steel.
  3. charly

    charly Guest

    Thanks for the feedback :)
  4. RIDGERUNNER30

    RIDGERUNNER30 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2009
    Messages:
    226
    Loc:
    Eastern, Kentucky
    Hey xclimber, I have a country wood stove model s-260 the next size down to the 310 canyon, I ordered my stove online and later i was able to visit a hearth store out of state and got to look at a pacific energy stoves. the features i like about pacific energy is you can load north/south and my country wood stove is setup to burn east/west, you can burn north/south but your wood has to be 15in to do so, when i purcased my woodstove it stated it would accept a 22in log,but that is east/west . my country wood is a good stove ,but i wish the firebox was deeper and the pacific energy t-6 and summit have deep fireboxes , think long and hard and weigh out the goods and bads because it your money. I see you live in new york and having a stove setup to burn north /south will be a big plus for you good luck .
  5. charly

    charly Guest

    Ridgerunner 30, I live in upstate NY, does get pretty cold here, so just want to get a big enough stove. Stove will be heating a redone 1850's farm house. 3 bedrooms.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,829
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If a 3 cu ft stove is not able to heat the house then the stove is not the problem. If it can't heat the place either the wood is not dry, the house is leaking heat like a sieve, or the stove is in a lousy location. Often heating complaints stem from a combo of these issues, none of which is because of the stove.
  7. charly

    charly Guest

    I think this Farm house will heat fine. It was all reinsulated over a number oy years before we bought the place. Even the attic has 2 inches aluminum faced insulation board in the ceilings up stairs, and then a good 12 inches of batts were added on top of that. People before us said they would go thru 500 gallons of oil, during the winter. The walls covering the big post and beam work, look to be at least 10 inches thick. All anderson windows. People did do a nice job on updating the place. So I think the house will heat OK. I agree with what you said about a 3 cuft box not heating. Something would be wrong for sure.
  8. RIDGERUNNER30

    RIDGERUNNER30 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2009
    Messages:
    226
    Loc:
    Eastern, Kentucky
    I 'am no stove salesman by no means and wanting to get a big wood stove is the way to go , you need a stove that can load north/south , you will be able to maintain a hotter stove which in return puts out more heat. They are alot of big stoves out there I see that you like the looks of the country wood canyon 310 and quadfire 5700. have you looked at the buckstove model 91 it has a 4.4 cubic feet firebox and is a cataltic wood stove which will be good for long burn times . buck stoves are very popular were i live and are built in north carlonia they have a website www. buckstoves .com I wish that i would got alot bigger stove and the one in my den room having a bigger firebox mean a whole lot less loading hey xclimber here is the place i ordered my wood stove stove www.hechlers.com they have a cool website were you can download stove information on the brands they sell, they sell blaze king, quad fire, buck stove, country stove, harman stove, and etc check them out good luck.
  9. charly

    charly Guest

    Thanks Ridgerunner30, I'll check into your info, much appreciated :)
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,829
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    500 gal of oil = ~ 70,000,000 btus or about 2.5 cords of wood. Sounds like you will be fine with any of the suggested stoves.
  11. charly

    charly Guest

    That will make me a happy camper, of course I didn't ask where they kept the thermostat or how many sweaters they wore :snake: I use to burn 10 cord a year before moving to this farm, went from a outdoor wood boiler to a Paxo 60 and 1600 gallons of storage. And now back to a plain old woodstove, going to love it, the simple life. Want to go away for the weekend, just turn on the oil heat, no water lines, pumps , etc to worry about freezing up. Been there done that. Power goes out, I have heat , water , gravity feed system and a stove to cook on. No power or generator needed. The good life! Thanks for everyones feed back!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  12. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    9,455
    Loc:
    base of Mt. Rainier on the wet side, WA
    The country stove is now a Lennox but when they were a country stove they were made here in WA. People loved them. The stoves had a huge radial fan, not a squirrel cage, and could move lots of air with the blower. The baffle systems used to be bricks and not a fiber board. Do they now use a fiber board? The bricks would be easy to replace and the blanket on top is a bulk item from a hardware store if you need to replace these things. The PE baffle system should be superior to about anything. It may come down to looks. The T6 is a pretty cast iron looking stove and the Country is a standard steel box stove. Which do you like?

    While I would prefer the option of burning N/S or E/W there is absolutely no difference in the heating abilities of the stove. An 800 degree 3CF stove makes the same heat nomatter how the wood is loaded and you would never know without looking.

    For my vote, if stove cost was even, I would go T6 in a heartbeat.
  13. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,665
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Uh . . . I'm just a dumb Yankee way up here in the northlands of Maine . . . but I'm pretty sure why being able to burn north or south may be appealing to some folks it doesn't do diddly in terms of creating any extra heat . . . while some folks may say being able to burn one direction vs. another makes a difference all I can say is that my experience with my one-way loading Oslo has shown that it is perhaps even more important to know how to run your stove, choose the right size wood and make sure your wood is plenty dry if you want to get the most heat and get a long burn.
  14. dobias

    dobias New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    Loc:
    NW lower MI
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page