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Carbide chains.....Whos got one?

Post in 'The Gear' started by AlaskaCub, May 4, 2008.

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  1. AlaskaCub

    AlaskaCub New Member

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    I have a Dolmar 510 (18") and have gone through 2 chains (one pro chain) in pretty rapid fashion and am strongly considering a Carbide chain to avoid the gruling task of constant sharpening. Can anyone point me in the right direction on what to get and where? Thanks

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  2. sjc1

    sjc1 New Member

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    Hi:
    Use them with the fire department. They are normally used for cutting through buildings and structures. Have never used them for cutting wood. Expect to pay around $200.00 for one chain. One company that sells them is:
    http://www.carbidechain.com/Another company, I believe, is Rapidco, or something to that effect. In order to sharpen them you need a special wheel. Hope this helps.
  3. AlaskaCub

    AlaskaCub New Member

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    I am a fireman too , we have several of the Stihl 460's on our engines, but I dont buy the chains or even know who orders em. They are bad azz saws with carbide chains, with a fairly new chain you can cut right through a double roof and a truss + insulation and not even know it. Gonna call our local saw shop tomorrow and see if they can get me a Carbide chain for my Dolmar.
  4. computeruser

    computeruser Feeling the Heat

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    1. I don't know of any purveyors of carbide who sell .325" pitch carbide chain. I presume your 510 is running .325" pitch. It would not be happy with 3/8" pitch.

    2. Carbide chain is a poor choice for wood cutting. It is expensive, slow cutting, easy to damage, and requires special tools and expertise to sharpen.

    The best solution is to figure out why you're dulling your chains so quickly, and to avoid the cause(s) as much as possible.
  5. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART Minister of Fire

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    I've never tried one, but that's what I've heard, too.
  6. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    AlaskaCub it shouldn't be a grueling task to sharpen a chain...it takes me 5 min or less with a 20" chain. The book is a good starting point but check with a few experienced old timers and they'll show you how easy it is. Sharpening is easy...cutting with a dull chain is grueling
  7. colebrookman

    colebrookman Minister of Fire

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    Second that. If you do a lot of cutting on the ground or in muddy areas just be prepared to sharpen. If you can raise the logs so you don't hit dirt or rocks that will help but usually a few passes with a file should get you back in business.
    Ed
  8. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    When I drag out my logs to be cut the log is pulled over 3 - 10ft saplings that are spaced out in the middle third of the log to be cut, like I'm trying to balance the log....they're about 4' or 5 inches in diameter, I just drive right over them. Sometimes I have to cut three quarters through then roll the log over...it's easy. But if you cut logs where they fall...yeah that can be hard on a chain. Just get a stump vise and sharpen it when you take a break...it's like so easy.
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