Careful With Those Ashes Folks

BrotherBart Posted By BrotherBart, Oct 17, 2006 at 2:34 PM

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
    Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    32,597
    9,759
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Happens every year:

    "The fire happened at about 11:30 a.m. Wednesday and started when a plastic bucket of wood stove ashes was placed on the wooden deck of the 4,000-square-foot house, at 24402 Maxfield Creek Road.

    “The wood stove had not been used for two days. Probably a good lesson for all of us,” said Alan Shifley, assistant chief of the Hoskins-Kings Valley Rural Fire Protection District.

    He urged people to put stove ashes in a metal bucket and keep them away from any wooden or flammable materials. Dousing the ashes with water also could help."

    http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/2006/10/17/news/community/5aaa03homefire.txt
     
  2. Gibbonboy

    Gibbonboy
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 3, 2006
    267
    0
    That's a pretty rural area, would have guessed that it was in a housing development. Sad that mistakes like this happen over and over. It all does boil down to common sense, though.
     
  3. cogger

    cogger
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 10, 2006
    193
    0
    I've been dumping mine in a 55gl steel barrell with rain water in it until the snow comes. I use the warm ash and the edge of my dooryard and road during winter on icy spots
     
  4. wg_bent

    wg_bent
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 19, 2005
    2,248
    7
    Loc:
    Poughkeepsie, NY
    That story is like a how to burn your house down in 1 easy lesson.

    My original response to this post was going to be more of a comical reply with an even more absurd scenerio, but I thought someone might take me seriously, so I ditched it.

    Just yesterday evening when about 5pm I pulled about 2 quarts of ashes out of the stove and put them in my usual metal pot. Put the pot out on the front walk (The only stone surface I feel comfortable putting hot ashes on) There were still a couple hot coals in there this morning. I've seen them last 3 days in that pot!!
     
  5. babalu87

    babalu87
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 23, 2005
    1,440
    1
    Loc:
    middleborough, ma.
    ..... and dont dump gasoline and then throw a match at it either.
     
  6. Rick

    Rick
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 23, 2005
    185
    0
    Loc:
    Connecticut
    This time last year my father put his medal ash can out on his patio, in a safe corner. A couple of days later we got a windy day and a whole bunch of leaves blew into that same corner. The leaves piled around the can and lit up. A good intentioned neighbor reported his house on fire. I'm on the volunteer fire department in my town so that was a fun ride to his house, he wasn't home so I couldn't get a hold of him. Luckily, his patio is all stone and the leaves were contained in one corner, so nothing happened to his house and the fire didn't spread. I took some ribbing for that, as did he. But lesson learned, be careful where you put that can.

    Rick
     
  7. KateC

    KateC
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 7, 2006
    166
    0
    Loc:
    Arizona
    I don't care what time it is or what the weather's like---I immediately take the closed metal bucket out to the far back yard and dump it in the firepit---if it's wet out fine---if it's dry and they want to stay alive I figure it's a good time to have a little bonfire and burn the junk mail.
     
  8. CountryGal

    CountryGal
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 1, 2006
    329
    11
    Loc:
    Table Rock Lake
    We have a metal ash bucket next to the stove and I know they can stay lit awhile.

    Where do you all dispose of your ash once it it totally cold?
     
  9. KateC

    KateC
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 7, 2006
    166
    0
    Loc:
    Arizona
    If it's cold and not got alot of hard chunkies in it I dump it on the compost pile---lucky to have a big yard in the boonies.
     
  10. hardwood715

    hardwood715
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 30, 2005
    410
    0
    Loc:
    Hyde Park, New York
    Am I missing something, or am I doing something wrong, after I put ashes in the bucket , I run some water in there. After a while I dump in my garden which is quite a ways from the house, why not water em down?
     
  11. KateC

    KateC
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 7, 2006
    166
    0
    Loc:
    Arizona
    I just don't like the muddy mess in the bucket---but if I knew it wasn't going to be dumped right away, I'd certainly run water into the bucket, but probably before I put the ashes in, to cut down on the splash and dust flying.
     
  12. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
    Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    32,597
    9,759
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Pretty much depends (pun intended) on how much coffee I have been drinking.
     
  13. hardwood715

    hardwood715
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Nov 30, 2005
    410
    0
    Loc:
    Hyde Park, New York
    hehehehe,
     
  14. MrGriz

    MrGriz
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 11, 2006
    1,022
    0
    Loc:
    Waterford, WI
    Ever feel like you're just "the middle man"?
     
  15. Gibbonboy

    Gibbonboy
    New Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Oct 3, 2006
    267
    0
    I compost my wood ashes, or spread them on the garden to raise the pH. I have 2 5-gallon metal pails with lids that I alternate outside cooling down. Other than being dusty, and getting tracked into the house, you can spread them on the ice/snow , both for traction, and to make the sunlight melt the ice faster. I won't put them on the driveway anymore, got sick of the mess after burning coal for so long and tracking cinders and dirt into the house. Plus I love to give my garden good stuff to grow with- more veggies for me!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page