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Circulating Heat from Wood Stove Question

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by TomR, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. AlaskanMudder

    AlaskanMudder New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Sorry to bring up an old post but I am new to the site and was wondering if I could pick your guys' brains.

    I live in Alaska and have a great outside airdraft blaze king that I love. Here is my issue. I have a 1500 square foot, two story split level home. I have a large cathedral ceiling in my living room directly over my oversize two car garage. The living room is pretty much the same size as the garage. When I run my stove, up against the front of the house, the living room gets really hot, and top floor elsewhere is comfortable. the basement, primararily consisting of a large bedroom in the back of the house, does not raise in temps until I run the stove for at least 4 + hours. Even then, it is just a few degrees if the stove is really cranking. I Have baseboard heat and would like to use as much of the wood heat to spread to as much of the house as possible. I would like to install a variable fan at the the ceiling upstairs, where it likely exceeds 110 and have it push air through about a 6-7" pvc pipe plumbed down through the garage, and into the crawlspace below the downstairs floor. Downstairs consists of two bedrooms and a bath and laundry room.

    I am hoping the heat pushed into the crawlspace will heat the house uniformly as it rises and force some air downstairs upward to the livingroom/stoveroom. I have read several posts on here and most address sideways movement or helping heated air downstairs go upward. Can anyone give me any advice on this? I have tried several fans in various locations, but due to the stairs changing directions 180 degrees, I think this is the only way to do it.

    Any help, advise, or fire and/or building codes quoted would be very appreciated.

    -Erik

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  2. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Explain your setup, whats a "outside airdraft blaze king"?

    How does the heat get into the house if the stove is outside?
  3. AlaskanMudder

    AlaskanMudder New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2013
    Messages:
    3
    Sorry, newbie here. I cant give you the model, I am currently deployed. the stove is in the house, it sucks combustion air from the outside and pulls into the fire box. this way, it does not suck air from the house, creating drafts and negative pressure in the house. This is probably common in newer stoves.
  4. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,437
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    yep that is called an OAK.

    Its hard to get heat to move down into the basement.

    Only thing I can think to try is install that Duct from basement to the room the stove is in up stairs. Have the duct fan slowly blow the cool air up to the stove room. The warm air should be pulled somewhat down to the basement since you have created an air loop with the duct. With the cool basement air being pushed up from the basement your stairways down to the basement you should feel some warmer air traveling down that way. Use the largest sized duct you can for a larger volume of air flow. Maybe put in two ducts if you can only use smaller duct.

    Its all about how much volume of air you can move around the loop you created. Dont use the duct fan on high go for volume of air with low air speed or you will get a cooling effect from the breeze you created.

    I think this is your only hope.

    Or relocate the stove down stairs and let the heat naturally rise.

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