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Convert NG to LP 1950's stove

Post in 'It's a Gas!' started by eclecticcottage, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    The threaded connection looks like it has thread tape or sealant on it ?
    Brush it clean with a wire brush. No sealant is used on a flare since the angled end is the mechanical joint. The threads are straight, not tapered and only pull it tight. The threads are not used for sealing like on tapered pipe threads that require sealant. Tape on a straight flare or hose thread only binds the threads so you can't feel it tighten properly on the seat.

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  2. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    WIn :cool: We do have to adjust three of the burners, they are a bit excessive.

    cottage61.JPG
  3. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Still have to adjust the oven and broiler, we haven't touched that yet. Also...this one seems to put off more heat than the old Hotpoint. WOWZERS. And the burners aren't adjustable (like low, med, high) so there will be a learning curve there.

    But it's in.

    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!
  4. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    They are hot burners. There's no yellow, so they are fine. Notice the light blue flame down at the burner, then it becomes a darker blue secondary flame that mixes with others and becomes one. This is like adjusting a torch when you have a pencil tip light blue flame that becomes the larger secondary flame. When you set a water filled kettle on the burner, you'll notice the flame change. At the highest setting, you want the flames to come to the edge of the kettle or pan, not up the sides. That's wasted heat. My commercial Garland star shaped burners are 30,000 each. I'd guess yours to be 15 to 20,000 each? Maybe more.
    There's no way to tell without knowing the oriface hole size.

    Check above the pilot for soot in a day or so. Then periodically. If you see an accumulation of black soot, it's too big. People tend to adjust pilots too large. It doesn't take much. Depending on the cup the pilot sits in, the rule of thumb is to the top of the cup looking across the top of it. If the cup is low, the pilot flame should only be as high as the center of the pilot tube. (the tube gas goes from burner to pilot through to light burner)

    Let me know if you have problems with the oven. It should adjust the same way.
  5. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    We did adjust the other burners a little. Two are perfect, one is pretty good and one is ehhh. It will take a little tweeking, but that's fine. The flames were wrapping up around the edges of our bigger pot on three if them, so we figured we should see if we could get them a bit smaller. After looking "under the hood" of the hotpoint I can't see why someone wouldn't want to work on this vintage of a stove-it's so much more straigh forward! Oh well.

    Is the oven orifice down in the oven? I haven't really looked for it yet, but I know It didn't look like it was up under the burner cover with the others.

    Oh and just for good measure since I kept posting pics before I cleaned under there...this is what it looked like after cleaning (without the burners or crumb trays in)

    [​IMG]
  6. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes, it's in the oven. The burner tube will be one piece like the top burners. Gas is admitted at the air intake / adjustment area, fuel mixes with air in the tube before coming out the holes. Sometimes the burner tube sits over the oriface and you need to remove the burner to tighten down the oriface. Others are far enough from the oriface to tighten it down wihtout removing the burner.

    Here's a few IMPORTANT things before you start trying to light the oven;
    I don't know the type of oven control this uses to ignite the main burner and be controlled by the thermostat without close ups of the thermostat control valve and pilot / burner.

    ** Open the top, and look carefully at the thermostat control for a little screw shank that sticks out with a cross piece like a T handle. (Or a T handle with only one side of the "T" like a motorcycle or small engine fuel shut off valve. It will have Nat and LP stamped on it, so you need to turn this adjuster over to the correct fuel. This changes the size of the oriface in the control valve so the "pilot control" is the correct size. **

    This could be the screw shown on picture #60. Somewhere on the control valve should be the adjuster that can be set to either N or P for Nat or Propane , or Nat and LP.

    This thermostat is a "pilot control" and is what keeps the pilot small to maintain a fire when oven is off or not calling for heat. When the T-stat is turned on calling for heat, the small pilot becomes much larger. That is what controlls the oven burner in this type of control. This larger pilot flame heats the oven safety valve capilary tube. The fluid in this tube expands and opens the oven main burner valve. (called a "safety valve") It takes time when the T-stat calls for heat and the pilot increases in size to heat the safety valve. 30 seconds to a minute for the oven valve to open. Make sure both the Nat / LP "switch" on the control and oriface is correct for LP before lighting. It takes time for the capilary tube on the safety valve to cool down to shut the main burner off as well.

    LP Gas vapor on a stove top is bad enough, but confined inside an oven can become much worse. Leave the door open until you're sure the burner is correct, lights smoothly, and burns blue.
  7. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    I know it's a robertshaw (or so says the oven temp control knob), but that's about it. It's a match light oven, no standing pilot there. I will take a look tonight and post if we have any questions. :)
  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    OK, that type without a standing pilot will hand light the main burner, and when it comes up to temp, the main burner shuts off and a bypass in the T-stat allows the main burner to go down to a very small flame. Almost little dots at each hole in the burner to just stay lit.
    That's the first type themostatic control of the oven. Then came standing pilot with safety valve, (like I explained in previous post) then electric spark, (DSI or Direct Spark Ignition) and now glow bars to warm the safety valve and ignite the oven.
  9. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Win x2! This was pretty easy actually. DH went over to a friends house to see if he had a spring for the carb on a little cultivator we picked up so I tackled it. The access for the orifice and the air flap are in the storage area next to the oven. The only thing with tuning the gas/air mix was waiting for the dirt to burn through after each tweak (yellow flames). And realizing I could check he flame via the broiler instead of leaving the "floor" out of the oven, lol.

    THANK YOU again! And we now have an oven for the first time here. YAY. Now we need to get an oven thermo and see if it's calibrated correctly.

    Attached Files:

  10. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Yep, it's easy once you do it. The next one you look at may seem completely different, but the basics are still there.

    You're right, the yellow is from dust and dirt knocked loose in the burner tube or can even be contaminents in the air (dust from shirt sleeves) that burns as it goes through.

    Some oven thermostat knobs have a screw on the back that the center portion that goes over the valve can rotate and slide in a slot, so you hold the knob center still and turn the knob to put the degrees on the face where you want them. Some ovens with broiler door under them are supposed to be used with broiler door partially open for proper circulation. That changes the temp. too.

    Glad I could walk you through it.
  11. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    Just popping back in to say we're still running the Bengal without issue. We use both the burners and oven regularly and it seems to use very little propane. I even found it a friend:

    [​IMG]

    that is a 1950's Norge Customatic, snagged it for $100. Runs super, quieter than our 200? Kenmore AND uses less electric than the (energy star rated) Kenmore too.

    Check out the egg keeper thingy:

    [​IMG]

    I couldn't stop there of couse, so I picked this up for $25:

    [​IMG]

    that is a 1960's era Kitchenaid 4C. Works great, just needed a serious cleaning.

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