1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

converting wood fireplace to a gas fireplace - request for advice

Post in 'It's a Gas!' started by 4x15mph, Dec 8, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. 4x15mph

    4x15mph New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Loc:
    southern PA
    I was so close to going with a wood insert but i am not a fan of the pollution that it "can" cause. I also believe that gas is a more popular choice in a residential setting (ease of use, remote control, etc.).

    I do not have gas available so I would have to have a propane tank installed.

    Should I go with direct vent? I have concerns over the moisture problems and CO2 emissions with a direct vent. I guess, in summary why shouldn't I go with direct vent? What are the absolute drawbacks that I should be aware of.

    Are the direct vents expensive to operate in contrast to heating a room with my conventional, oil furnace? I am not looking to use this as a heating source, I just do not want to continue to have to leave a damper open with my wood fire up until the coals are completely out. A lot of oil heat goes out the chimney over night and I would need expensive, custom doors (stone fireplace) in order to address this

    Your thoughts... thank you

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Messages:
    4,838
    Loc:
    Averill Park, NY, on Burden Lake II...
    <>I was so close to going with a wood insert but i am not a fan of the pollution that it "can" cause.<>

    Not sure you get the idea of "pollution." Today's EPA certified inserts (and stoves) are as clean burning as the old catalytic combuster types. The amount of CO2 going into the air is the same amount if the wood was dying & oxidizing (rotting) on the ground...

    <>I also believe that gas is a more popular choice in a residential setting (ease of use, remote control, etc.).
    I do not have gas available so I would have to have a propane tank installed. <>

    Ease of use, cleanliness, lifestyle, all count as good reasons to burn gas.
    LP tanks can be "hidden" with lattice or fencing or you can put them on the side of the house where only the neighbors can see them! (like I did!)

    <>Should I go with direct vent?<>

    Definitely..

    <>I have concerns over the moisture problems and CO2 emissions with a direct vent.<>

    There are NO moisture or CO2 Emissions to worry about - IF your unit is correctly installed...It 's a sealed combustion system & Everything exhausts out of the top of your chimney

    <>I guess, in summary why shouldn't I go with direct vent? What are the absolute drawbacks that I should be aware of.<>

    Initial cost & the future costs of LP are your main concerns. The units we sell range from $3k INSTALLED up to about $5.6k...
    You can save $700 - $800 by doing the install yourself...
    Most of them will burn a gallon of propane in 3 hours or less - when set on high...
    You can use a t-stat or turn the burner down to extend the per gallon burn time...


    <>Are the direct vents expensive to operate in contrast to heating a room with my conventional, oil furnace?<>

    If used as a "zone-heater," a DV insert will save you money by allowing you to turn your furnace/boiler down...
    Why heat the entire house if you can heat the rooms you use the most?
    I didn't turn our oil boiler on until the Saturday before Thanksgiving...
    My insert is in the family room, where the TV, Computers, & stereo all are...It's where we hang...
    Sure, it was chilly in the bedrooms, but that's why we have extra blankets & comforters...
    A small ceramic heater took the chill off the bathroom...

    <>I am not looking to use this as a heating source, I just do not want to continue to have to leave a damper open with my wood fire up until the coals are completely out. <>

    Well, if your power goes out, an insert is a viable heat source for a short period of time...Installed properly, the damper area is packed with insulation around the DV liners...Insulation is also packed around the top of liners & under the cap...You end up with a "dead" air column in your chimney - which is essentially insulation...
    No heat OUT...no cold IN

    <>A lot of oil heat goes out the chimney over night and I would need expensive, custom doors (stone fireplace) in order to address this<>

    You could pay about 1/3 - 1/2 the price of an insert for a custom set of doors...& you'd still lose SOME heat up the flue...
    A wood burning fireplace is assentially a campfire in your living room...with the efficiency of about MINUS 10%

    <>Your thoughts... thank you<>

    My $.02 - you're welcome!
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page