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DIY Chimney Install.

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by saggys, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. saggys

    saggys New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2012
    Messages:
    28
    Loc:
    WI, USA
    Recently got an estimate to have a chimney installed for my old Jotul combifire #1 and was made to feel like I had the Yugo of woodstoves. Because it has no UL tag and was pre EPA I got the insurance company lecture and such. Then they steered me to a Pacific Energy true north model. All said and done my estimate was 10% of what I paid for the hunting shack and property.
    Being the cheepskate I am, which is what got me into this situation, I am thinking of installing it myself with Supervent components or Duravent components and my own reduced clearance kit. Is it worth having it done with a modern stove? Should I cut my losses on the Combifire?

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,892
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    We've guided several people through chimney installations. As long as you have reasonable carpentry skills, take your time to do the job well and safely and are thorough it should go ok.

    The Combifire is a respectable heater. It won't burn nearly as clean and efficiently as a modern stove, but it will throw off a lot of heat. It's a very radiant stove. That's why the generous clearances. But they can be reduced by 2/3d with proper wall shielding.

    The PE True North is a nice stove. It should be a good choice for this application. What kind of prices are we talking about? What was the quote for the stove and what was the price of the chimney installation and stove connection?
  3. saggys

    saggys New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2012
    Messages:
    28
    Loc:
    WI, USA
    Chimney =$1,170, Labor =$800, Stove =$1,099, Hearthpad =$557 All said and done with tax over $3,800. Just came from some big box stores and with a heat shield and chimney and hearth pad and keeping my old stove I could do it for about $800 or less. I am not against any body from making a living but it seems a bit extreme to me. I have basic carpentry skills so I may give it a shot.
    Our stove is set up now with a rear flue exit and I want it out of the top. I am hesitant to try to remove the bolts as they will probably snap off. What do you think my chances are for removing the bolts?

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