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  1. magentaman

    magentaman Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    157
    Loc:
    Western Washington State
    I recently moved into a new place. It has a Earth Stove 901/905 installed. After a month of burning in it, it is apparent this little stove can really put out the heat.

    I can't seem to find much info on these stoves online. Anyone on her give me some history on them and tips or tricks a noob might need to know.

    Thanks!

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,904
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Welcome magentaman. Earth Stove made popular cavernous big box designs, popular out west here in the early 80's. Their stoves resembled the old Blaze Kings somewhat, but with more ornanmentation. They were bought up by Lennox about a decade ago I think.

    Do you have a photo you can post of your stove that you could post here? Maybe one of the interior of the firebox too? I have never seen your model.
  3. magentaman

    magentaman Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    157
    Loc:
    Western Washington State
    Pictures will be up in a matter minutes. I remember when my folks replaced an old Franklin wood stove with a Blaze King in the 80's. Man what a difference.
  4. magentaman

    magentaman Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    157
    Loc:
    Western Washington State
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Air control with homemade knob.

    [​IMG]
    ID tag with no date of manufacture.

    [​IMG]

    My guess is this stove is late 70's early 80's. Based on the age of the house and what little info I could get from the prior occupant.

    Trying to decide if I want to stay with wood heat and upgrade for next winter, or go back to a pellet stove (should have never sold mine when I moved).
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,904
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Thanks. I'm pretty certain this is a pre-EPA model. Your stove looks like like a variation on the 101/105 with the addition of ported side shields. Nice fire in there. These are good chunk burners for NW softwood. Is that fir you are burning?

    I'll be moving this thread to the classic stove forum so that you can get more targeted responses from other Earthstove owners.

    PS: there is a manual for the 101 posted here. Click on the bold blue link at the top of the page:
    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/wiki/File:Earthstove100_manual.PDF/
  6. magentaman

    magentaman Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    157
    Loc:
    Western Washington State
    I have a mixture of fir, alder, & hemlock from a local supplier. I have been out of the wood burning game for so long, I am not really sure who to buy from or what to look for. I know my uncle is dead set against burning fir.
  7. Dune

    Dune Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2008
    Messages:
    2,777
    Loc:
    Commonwealth Of Massachussetts
    I think that stove is very cute.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    46,904
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Doug fir is ALL we burned for the past couple years. 6 cords of it so far. It's a fine firewood. Send your uncle here for some re-edjumacation. :)
  9. jb1951

    jb1951 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2007
    Messages:
    17
    Loc:
    SE Indiana
    We had the larger Earth Stove for ten years and we loved it. Our house is a raised ranch with most of our living area on the second level. We had the Earth Stove in our family room in the basement and it heated the entire house. They're great stoves and the original Earth Stoves (pre-Lennox) still bring a good price.

    My husband cuts all of our wood. We burned oak, ash, elm, cherry and locust and hedge apple when we could find it. We saved the locust and hedge apple for really cold weather because it burns so long and so hot. The most important thing is to make sure your wood is fully dried. We didn't know anything about burning wood when we first moved here 14 years ago. My husband learned the hard way that burning even partially green wood will cause creosote to build up fairly quickly and cause a flue fire. Now he won't burn any wood that hasn't dried for at least a year.

    The only thing I didn't like about the Earth Stove was that it had no ash pan. The ashes had to be shoveled out after we let the stove cool and no matter how careful we were, dust would fly up from the ashes and get in the air. That's the only reason we changed stoves. We've had a catalytic Vermont Castings Defiant for the last four years. It has an ash pan with a lid that slides right over the ashes, so no more dust.

    My brother-in-law has a pellet stove. It does a pretty good job, but I don't think anything throws off the kind of warmth that wood does. It would be hard for me to get used to any other kind of heat.

    Good luck with your stove.
  10. TOOTH CLEANER 1

    TOOTH CLEANER 1 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    I have a earth stove with the same air control knob as Magentaman has. Could you tell me the how is the best way to operate this. How should a place it for maximun heat. Thanks, Tooth Cleaner 1

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