Everyone wants to make a dent.

Hbbyloggr Posted By Hbbyloggr, Nov 14, 2006 at 1:06 AM

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  1. Hbbyloggr

    Hbbyloggr
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    Nov 3, 2006
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    I was approached by an electrical/mechanical engineer and a farmer this afternoon inquiring about my Outdoor Wood Furnace. They have been brain storming over new fuel sources which are abundant on farms ( take a guess what they want to burn ! Yes, that's right. You guessed it ) . They are working on the ratio between sawdust/wood chips and pasture paddies. They are also inquiring what OWF would be a good combination for their experiment.

    My feeling is their energy should be spent on designing a clean burning, efficient, Outdoor wood furnace. The fuel source wouldn't matter at that point, accepting fuel that is regionally available at low cost. Farms generally have the same end products (sic), so that is what they are targeting.

    I told them I would run the idea across this board to see if there is already a furnace being produced that will give good results and any other thoughts on the technology.

    Thank you for your thoughts.
     
  2. DriftWood

    DriftWood
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    Apr 5, 2006
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    Talk about clean burning farmers. I saw a PBS program about China, The farmer there had crude cement vat full of dung fermenting. He just pipes off the methane produced to cook with.
     
  3. begreen

    begreen
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    Already done in Asia. When I was in India, wherever one went you would eventually see cow patties drying for fuel.

    I can't recommend an OWB manufacturer that has designed a clean boiler. Most are pretty inefficient and dirty. I would point them to the indoor boilers that can be connected to a proper stack and put in a weatherproof outdoor shed if desired.

    search on wood boilers threads for more info on:

    US made:
    Black Bear (Maine) , Greenwood Furnace (Washington), Alternative Heating Systems (Pennsylvania), Garn (Canadian?)
    Europe:
    Tarm, Eko
     
  4. Hbbyloggr

    Hbbyloggr
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    Nov 3, 2006
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    Thank you. I will pass along the information.

    In the mean time, I gave them an old Essex down draft gasification industial type furnace to experiment with. It is a better design by far over the OWB of today. Wood is super heated in a firebox and the gasses pulled down through high temp refractory where it is burned. The heat then pulled down through the heat tubes of the water jacket, extracted and then exhausted through a chimney. The original owner told me that it was a great furnace but I never had a chance to verify that. Control was accomplished though aquastats. The physical design looked like a locomotive engine.

    Maybe these guys will strike upon something " new " for us to use in the future.
     
  5. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    In India, you have to decide whether to use it for fuel or as a building product.

    I have no idea if it makes sense, but I would like to think it's more efficient to put the manure back into the soil and then grow a crop that can be burned for fuel. Although the methane idea has some merit.
     
  6. Hbbyloggr

    Hbbyloggr
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    Nov 3, 2006
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    I would tend to agree with you on using it for its basic nutrient value. Heck, with only two working dairy farms left near us ,I pay a premium to have it trucked to my garden each year. But I guess the buzz word these days is energy and all the alternatives it conjures up. Ethanol, methane and on and on. Like everything else it's " what's available at reasonable cost in your community ".
     
  7. webbie

    webbie
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    Nov 17, 2005
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    We have spent so many decades trying to get "away" from the land, it's interesting to see an attempt to come back to it! Luckily, Mother Nature herself is usually there to greet us on return.

    Yes, the Essex was a gasification design similar to Tarm, et. al.

    They had some big problem, though, mostly of premature failure of the welds and fireboxes, something which can happen in any boiler buy is aggravated by a number of factors in OWB and gasification types. The original Taylor OWB's were failing in 3-7 years on a regular basis - that's a short life after you spend $5K plus. Most have gone to stainless steel now.....time will tell even about that.
     
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