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Expert advice needed about older stove installation

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by Foolscrow, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. Foolscrow

    Foolscrow New Member

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    I found a small wood stove for my trout cabin. It is very old and there arent any real resources online for things like this. Its a fairly common design, I believe its known as a laundry stove. It seems to be missing a bottom section. I think its supposed to sit higher up off the ground maybe with some small decorative feet or something. What would you suggest I use instead? Also it seems to have a 8" exhaust pipe fitting. Does that seems too large, could it be down graded to 6 or 4? Its missing the flue piece as well(if it ever had one) do I need one of those? In such a small place(8'x12' cabin) should I add a small fresh air inlet near the stove? Do you suggest side or vertical shaft for the exhaust? Lastly, do you put an ash pan in the bottom or just use a little shovel when it gets full? If so what material do you make an ash pan out of? Sorry about so many question but I needed the help :)

    cabin 092.JPG cabin 095.JPG cabin 096.JPG cabin 097.JPG
    the boot is a size 12 16in tall muck boot for a size reference. Thought that might be needed for exhaust pipe size. Thanks for any advice you can give me.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Do you really want to use this for the cabin? It's designed to concentrate heat under a copper laundry tub, and not really for heating. The clearances the stove is going to need are going to take up most of the space in the cabin. The stove is missing its legs. It will need to be raised up at least 6" or more off the floor on a non-combustible stand for safety. And then it is going to need an insulated hearth.

    Note that you don't want to use galvanized pipe for a wood stove. It needs to be stainless or black steel. What is the pipe that is stuck in there now, 6" round galvanized?

    Here is an example of the legs that are missing. Ash is shoveled out and goes into a metal hod or ash container only.

    l223_1.jpg
  3. Foolscrow

    Foolscrow New Member

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    I think its type b 6' vent pipe. I just used it to do a test burn in the stove outdoors to see how things worked. I know i need "type A" double or triple from below the attic up and out. I have been doing research on the clearance issues and plan on doing some things sorta like this guy did www.small-cabin.com/small-cabin-off-grid-heating.html Im not really planning on using it all the time, just maybe a few days in the winter. Its in the ozarks and I dont expect to spend much time down there when its real cold or snowy. My idea was to use it to warm the cabin before bed let it burn out then, fire it up again in the morning to get dressed. I dont expect to use it for more than 2 or 3 hours at a time. What size stove would you recommend for a insulated 100 square ft cabin? I understand the fire box is shaped different but the surface area is about the same. I figured it really wouldnt matter very much with it being on such a small scale.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Good to hear that you've been doing your research. Looks like an 8" oval on the stove, but if you can get 10-12' of stack on it (total) then it might be ok with 6" round connector and class A. How did it burn with the short vent pipe?

    You'll want that to be on firm footing. Tip it up and see if there are bolt threads in the base corners. If so you might be able to have a welding shop fab up some sturdy legs for it out of angle iron and some steel plate. The shield in the article is serious overkill, but the right idea. There are simpler ways to make a shield. One non-combustible layer, with a 1" ventilated air gap behind it will suffice. That would reduce the clearances down to 18" to the shielded surfaces.

    Stay posted and let us know if you need any help. The main concern here is to keep you safe. If you decide to bail on this stove, look for a Jotul 602 in good condition. It's a perfect small cabin stove.
  5. Foolscrow

    Foolscrow New Member

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    Thanks for you help. I have to buy the stove pipe no matter what and it will most likely outlive the stove. Would 8" be a more universal size for when I want to upgrade? I plan to run about 11' of pipe. That picture is very helpful! I have access to a welding shop so that wont be a problem now that I know what they look like. The stove started and burned well. I ran it all day non stop for 2 days while I put the siding on my cabin.I wanted to make sure the thing wouldnt crack or something crazy like that. I even cooked and made coffee on it. The center near the pipe is the hottest part but you can leave your percolator near the edge to keep it warm all day. Such a short pipe outside probably isnt the best indicator of how well a stove starts I guess. Once it heated up it seemed fairly air tight. I removed one of the top plates and as I was putting it back down there was a suction feeling. Once the fire got going well the chimney didnt smoke at all. I have no idea if that is a good or bad thing. The air around it was pretty warm considering it was outside in 40* temps. I sat next to it at night and in the mornings instead of having a big camp fire. Do I need a damper for this stove?
  6. hilbiliarkiboi

    hilbiliarkiboi Member

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    Yes to damper.
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    +1 for the damper. It will give you better regulation over the fire. 6" pipe is much more common and less expensive. In this small a cabin I don't think you are going to need larger.

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