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Fireplace put out more heat then insert ?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by ryanm51981, Nov 25, 2012.

  1. ryanm51981

    ryanm51981 New Member

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    I replaced my old heatilator fireplace with a Regency I1200 small wood insert with NO blower . That was all I could fit inside that firebox.....Anyways after about a month of owning it I am a little worried. It doesnt seem to put out the same heat that my fireplace did. My house is fairly large with cathedral ceilings and open floor plan. The fireplace after 2-3 hours of cranking it would heat the living room up to almost 70 degrees on an average winter night. My new wood insert has not gotten the living room that warm yet. Also I rarely used the blower on my heatilator when I had it. Anyone have any ideas??

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  2. TTigano

    TTigano Member

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    First off.... are you filling the stove with well seasoned wood ( under 20%moisture ) and getting it good and hot then shutting the air down? Seems this to be the only method for you without a blower. If you leave the air open too much all the heat goes right up the chimney.
  3. ryanm51981

    ryanm51981 New Member

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    The wood isnt seasoned that well...That was one of the factors I was thinking about . Also Ive Im gonna try that method of shutting the draft half way and seeing if that makes a difference.
  4. TTigano

    TTigano Member

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    There is no draft seating on that stove. You can only regulate the air intake. If you want to try how the stove would work on real dry wood.... buy a bundle of kiln dried from the supermarket or convenience store. Unseasoned wood will barely burn on anti g less than full air.
  5. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    Get a bundle as suggested. Does the insert have a Stainless Steel liner connected to it? Is there some reason that you opted for no blower? It's kinda the lungs behind the operation, it will make all the difference.
  6. WhitePine

    WhitePine Feeling the Heat

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    The real question is how much wood did it take for the open fireplace to do the job compared to the insert? I'll bet that fireplace ate wood much faster than the insert consumes it. Get the insert going with dry wood and you should see a real difference in consumption.
  7. EJL923

    EJL923 Feeling the Heat

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    I don't even know why they offer inserts with the blower as an option. It should be a stock part of the setup.
  8. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    TT nailed it.

    1) Make sure you are burning well seasoned wood. These newer stoves need well seasoned wood.

    2) Like a fireplace if you leave the air control all the way open a good amount of the heat is going right up the chimney . . . if you get the fire going strong and then slowly cut back on the air control less heat will go up the chimney and if the wood and fire temps are good you should be rewarded with a nice treat with an EPA secondary burning woodstove (heat PLUS a visual show).

    Combine these two things and I think you will see a big difference in the heat output . . . many folks make the mistake of thinking the EPA woodstoves work like the old woodstoves and fireplaces (i.e. they can use not as well seasoned wood and more air equals more heat when the opposite is what works.)
    Trooper likes this.
  9. ryanm51981

    ryanm51981 New Member

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    I had no room for the blower. I needed another 1.5" of height which I didnt have . Also yes the old stove ate firewood very quickly and I was able to put in much bigger logs. I also felt about a 3mph wind coming down my hallway for the air it was sucking haha. I was not aware of that firefighter jake. I just assumed if I left the draft wide open it would equal more air and more heat and just burn the wood faster but at a higher temp. I will steal some seasoned wood from my dad and see what happens. Ill also upload some pics of the new install...It came out pretty nice. The stove was installed with a new stainless steel liner
  10. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    I never knew there was a difference! The draft setting is the air intake. Perhaps you are thinking of a damper?
  11. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    I didn't realize that any insert needed extra head room if you added a blower. I'm not real familiar with regency, but that's a first for me.
  12. brian89gp

    brian89gp Feeling the Heat

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    An insert with a blower and an insert without a blower are two entirely different animals. A freestanding stove has 6 sides to radiate heat to the room, an insert only 1. Add a blower though and watch out.

    That is odd that adding a blower would add to the dimensions of the stove. What is your opening size?
  13. ryanm51981

    ryanm51981 New Member

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    I installed the CI1200 from regency . The CI1250 is the same unit with a blower. The difference in height is almost 4" for the blower . I only had about 21" in height. I had plenty of width and about 17" depth. Also I had a prefab fireplace so my options were very limited.
    http://www.regency-fire.com/Products/Wood/Wood-Inserts/CI1250.aspx ----UNIT WITH BLOWER
    [​IMG]
  14. ryanm51981

    ryanm51981 New Member

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    IMG_3522.JPG IMG_3523.JPG

    Attached Files:

  15. ryanm51981

    ryanm51981 New Member

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    I included some pics of what Im trying to heat ....the ceiling is about 18 feet high
  16. RORY12553

    RORY12553 Minister of Fire

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    I can't add anything to this becasue I am new to burning myself and I have a stove rather than an insert. Only thing I can say is nice looking house!!
  17. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    That TV should provide half the heat ya need for the house. ;lol
    Bluezx636 likes this.
  18. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    A 1.4 cu ft flush mount insert with no blower and really tall ceilings is going to be really hard to work with.

    When operating the stove, the air controls should be closed or close to closed while maintaining high temps. Otherwise you will be feeding that stove every hour and all the heat will be going up the chimney/pipe.
    Curly likes this.
  19. ryanm51981

    ryanm51981 New Member

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    Would using a tower fan next to the stove help out at all? Like by blowing some of the radiant heat away faster?
  20. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

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    First, figure out how to measure temperatures on that insert. Next, get a thermometer on it so you know what you are burning out. You need to get it at a high temp (what ever the manufacturer recommends as a high) with the air controls nearly closed.

    Then you need to see what type of heat the stove throws.

    Your best bet would be to blow air at the stove to circulate the air in the room.
  21. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    An insert without a blower makes a huge difference in heating, add not so seasoned wood and your climbing an uphill battle. Some good seasoned wood and a fan blowing at the stove may help mix things up. Do you have insulation and a block off plate? That will help keep quite a bit more heat in the house instead of up the flue, also if thats an outside wall your losing some heat from the bricks absorbing heat and radiating outside, you can remedy this by insulating behind the insert.
  22. maverick06

    maverick06 Minister of Fire

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    I have tried to run my insert without the blower, i get very little heat from it. i would suggest, as others did above, you point a fan at it, you might notice one signifigant difference there, not as much as dry wood of course.
  23. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    I bet that your TV only see's half of it's life expectancy being so close to the insert. Plasmas are heaters in themselves and need to cool off, it can't do that with all that extra heat a few feet away. I've heard this has been a big problem lately, TV's aren't lasting very long because everyone wants one above the fireplace. Good Luck.
    Heatsource and nate379 like this.
  24. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    I was thinking the same thing about the massive amount of heat that goes up. That high above my insert after burning 24/7 for a few days my bricks up there are over 100F right abouve the stove there 120ish i think maybe hotter, warm to the touch..

    I think your wood is the main problem.
  25. ryanm51981

    ryanm51981 New Member

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    The TV actually doesnt got hot from the insert at all. My fireplace made the bottom of the TV warm to the touch. I think its because of how big the area is that im trying to heat.

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