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Fireview - First Fire

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by dylskee, Oct 13, 2012.

  1. weatherguy

    weatherguy Minister of Fire

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    Dont knock your carpentry skills, that hearth looks great, I see everyone found where the warm, comfy spot in the house was pretty quick :)
    dylskee likes this.

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  2. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    Your install is great...looks perfect in your setting. When I had the Fireview, mine was backed just by the painted wall, with framed dutch tiles on either side, and an old knight's grave rubbing to one side. Looked nice too, and I enjoyed the shadows the stovepipe cast on the wall evenings. A plain wall, while not as heat absorbing or complete as yours, can be nice too....
  3. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    You will get that stove well over 450. Much depends upon the fuel and how you load the stove. Also, I know that Woodstock says you can engage the cat at 200 but I still go to 250 or very close to that before engaging the cat. We can hit 600-700 with only 3 splits at times but not always. This time of year I prefer not so hot of a stove and 500-550 is plenty hot enough. At least it still keeps some clothing off the females.

    You no doubt will have questions as the air gets colder and you are burning more. One word of warning is if you are not careful, you will end up with a bed of coals to large that you can't get too much wood in there. To take care of that problem before it happens, when burning full time, when the stove has cooled to 400, this is when we open the draft full and just let it burn. It will continue to give good heat and burn the coals down at the same time. Also, at this time, don't worry about sending too much heat up the chimney as all you are doing is burning down the coals and keeping the house warm. Burning them this way is much better than hearing about folks deliberately scooping out hot coals so they have room in the stove to put the wood. A total waste.
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  4. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    I do this too, but have never started the full draft burning when the stove was still at 400. Will have to give that a try for comparison. I have always waited until the stove was considerably cooler. Your way probably burns down faster but gives a much more consistent heat output throughout the burn. Really good idea for those cold days...
  5. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

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    Also, the stove top temps don't tell the whole story since the cat sits right under your thermometer. You can have a 450 temp with a good bit of flame and it produce more heat than a smoldering 600 degree stove top because the whole stove is hot verses just the top where the cat is feeding on the smoke.
    dylskee likes this.
  6. Cross Cut Saw

    Cross Cut Saw Feeling the Heat

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    Very nice, I have a similar setup with a slate hearth under my PH. The wall behind it is painted but I think I'll put some matching slate up it half way to complete the "look".
    dylskee likes this.
  7. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    You only have to use that method when you are burning full time. I recall when we first started with the Fireview and too many coals was a problem. I'd never had a stove that built up coals like that. After experimenting a bit, this is what we found works the best so now we never have that problem.

    The point that Todd is trying to make is for those really cold days when you need the most heat. Be sure to keep flame in the box as you definitely will get more heat than if you let the flame die out.
  8. dylskee

    dylskee Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks WG, yeah the crowd in front of woodstove is getting bigger and bigger. The recliner next to the stove has always been mine but now the wife and the cat have taken over that seat! Next year's project is installing my old stove in the cellar, looks like I'll have to put a recliner and tv down there and I'll be good to go..... ==c
  9. dylskee

    dylskee Feeling the Heat

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    That's a great tip BS!! I'm actually burning down the coals right now, got pretty warm here today so don't really need the stove cranking. This stove defintely holds the heat though, a lot longer than my Efel.
  10. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

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    Heh - I can imagine. I opted to design and cut all the pieces in the basement and dry-assemble it there to prove it would all fit, then assemble in place upstairs. Although technically it COULD be moved out it isn't going to happen as long as I live her and I can't imagine how many folks it will take to move it.

    Your setup looks really good though - can't wait to see how it will look once the back wall is all done too.
    dylskee likes this.
  11. charly

    charly Guest

    Great job on the hearth pad. I'm building my first one as well for my Fireview. Just staining the wood siding, going to apply that, blue tape on the top edge and start grouting the joints. That way I can bring my mortar right to the board. I used thin used red brick. Nothing fancy, back wall is brick. Wife just wanted a plane square pad because the house is old. So that's what I built. 000_0272.JPG
    dylskee likes this.
  12. dylskee

    dylskee Feeling the Heat

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    Looks great charly! I might get the rest of mine finished up next weekend, looks like some mild weather this up coming week so I won't be burning much.
    charly likes this.
  13. charly

    charly Guest

    One thing for sure, it makes me appreciate how nice other peoples heart builds are. I dread dragging the stove onto the stones. Have to be careful. Think I will use leg slides and some small sheets of plywood, until she's in place , then lift one side of the stove at a time and remove everything. Actually will carry or lift the stove, inch by inch. Hope the wife is feeling strong. Her and I got the Quad 5700 out ourselves. Just have to work smart. Going to strip down the fireview, top and door off and remove the firebrick. I guess I really appreciate it all once my break in fires are done. I want to do them right, because I think I'm going to love this stove. Everyone else does;lol.
  14. dylskee

    dylskee Feeling the Heat

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    Yeah, it wasn't fun moving the hearth and stove, the hearth is probably 350~400 lbs. and the fireview is 485 lbs. We had 4 of us moving it, i got the hearth into the house and rolled it into place with a furniture dolly, then did the same with the stove. Picked it straight up and onto the dolly and rolled it into place. The wheels on the dolly did make some marks on my hardwood floors so kee that in mind if you choose that option. Judging by your picture, it looks like you have wide plank pine floors.

    As far as the break in fires go, make sure your first two fires are low. My first one was just kindling, let it burn out, the second fire was kindling and a small split. On the second fire I could here some sizzling in the corner where the soap stone and cast iron meet, sounded like the cement curing. At that point I went out for a couple hours and let the stove completely cool before I lit the final break in fire. The third fire I engaged the cat @ 250 degrees and let it rip. I kept the fire going all night and most of today, didn't hear any more air noise and all the paint and cement cured. The house smelled pretty bad for most of the night but the smell is pretty much gone now.
    Here's a pic with the cat engaged, stove top temps @450 degrees.
    cat engaged.jpg
    charly likes this.
  15. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    Personally, I'd try to get someone in to help with the lifting before taking the door off, or any other dismemberment other than the top.....
  16. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    Handsome stove! Great fire! You're going to love the stove...
    dylskee likes this.
  17. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    When my wife and I put our stove on the hearth we used a bunch of blocks to lift it. I would tilt one side up and my wife put a block under it. We repeated that process until it was the right height and then used some carpet strips to walk it back on a couple of inches at a time. We were able to move the stove into the final resting spot without scratching anything.
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  18. charly

    charly Guest

    Kind of what I plan on doing with the fireview. It's sits on a Dolly at the present time.
  19. charly

    charly Guest

    Yes those are old wide plank floors. House is 1840. One half of the room has 8 inch broads and the other half has boards going the opposite way, those being 14 inch wide boards. One person believed they could be walnut. I know they are very hard and don't scratch easy. I wheeled my Quad 5700 off the other hearth and out of the room down a very shallow ramp and out the back door to my tractor with pallet forks. The fireview came in the same way.Floor seemed OK as far as marking it up. I did shim the other stove up with blocking until it was off the ground and the dolly was now holding it. Why I had the fireview pallet in the air , I built a bottom underneath so I could set it on a dolly. I'll just take my time moving it. I want nothing scratched or broken. Looks like some windows will have some fans in for the break in fires.
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