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firewood cart

Post in 'The Gear' started by raybonz, Mar 15, 2008.

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  1. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Looking for ideas for an inexpensive but durable and stable way to transport firewood on unstable ground. Does not have to fit through a door as I carry it in from the foot of the stairs.. Large wheels would be a plus..Any ideas for a cheap way out?

    Thanx,
    Ray

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  2. Jake

    Jake Member

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    how about a red wagon with the "big" wheels
  3. Redox

    Redox Minister of Fire

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    Wheelbarrow works for me. Large wheel and only one of 'em...

    Are you talking soft ground? What kind of distance?
  4. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Hello Redox,
    Sometimes I use it in the woods in front of my house and the ground is soft and unstable.. Wheelbarrow is unstable with a top heavy load in a situation like that plus it would be hard to use in snow.. Thinking 2 wheels or maybe 3 or 4.. Would rather keep lower to ground so it wouldn't want to flip over.. Something to pull behind me.. Years ago I used old baby carriages with maybe 10" spoked wheels and that worked pretty good... I like those large ones made in VT. but they're pretty expensive.. Yard sale season will be here soon and that may be my best solution...

    Ray
  5. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Those work great but leaving them in the weather destroys them... I have one but don't want to destroy it ... Thanx for your input!

    Ray
  6. Redox

    Redox Minister of Fire

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    Baby Carriage! Arr! Arr! Maybe drop a small block in it.... :lol:

    Sorry, that just sounded funny. Whatever works; just don't let the neighbors see you!

    Anyone using a DR powerwagon? Only $2k, but it won't cut your grass.
  7. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Yeah it does seem funny! Hey I don't care what anyone thinks as long as it works... I have seen many golf carts with wheels at yard sales I wonder if I can modify one to meet my needs? My closest neighbor is 500' away plus I am set back 200' from the road.. Just can't justify paying 200 to haul firewood around my property..

    Ray
  8. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

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    Thinking of the hand carts I saw in the Hutterite & Amish colonies decades ago. High narrow steel wheels about 36 inch diameter so they rolled over obstacles easily. Axle came in, then down low so platform between the wheels was only about 6 inches off the ground for low CG. Most were flat platform but it could be a box or three sided box with open front. Push bar on the back. Often saw 2 or 3 kids pushing a fairly heavy load.

    k
  9. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    This is a modified garden cart. Has hauled hundreds of cords (full) for me over the past 15 years. This is one tool you need to keep out of the weather when not in use, as mentioned, if you want it to last. But I've hauled wood in all seasons and expect to get another 20 years, or more, out of it. The plastic tub will still sit in the frame easily, so you can also use it like a regular garden cart. I usually just pull the tub across the lawn, however.

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  10. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Do you know where you can steel wheels like that? Those would work well... Gonna do some research on the cart you describe.

    Thanx,
    Ray
  11. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Hi Eric,
    Do you have a picture that you could post? Sounds like you have something decent and time proven..

    Thanx,
    Ray
  12. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Sorry. The pics don't want to cooperate this morning for some reason. The frame is just 2x4s with 3/4-inch galvanized pipe stakes passing through the studs sandwiched between pieces of 3/4-inch plywood for strength and stability. I anchored the pipe ends to the bottom of the frame with pipe flanges screwed into the wood. The nice thing about this rig is that you can push it or pull it. The pulling comes in handy in all kinds of rough terrain and allows you to comfortably and reliably move wood over reasonably long distances, up small hills, etc. It turns you into a beast of burden, but that's not much different from any other aspect of firewood production.

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  13. Ncountry

    Ncountry Member

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    How about modifying one of those carts they make for carting deer out of the woods? they make a few different designs.
  14. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    That looks pretty sturdy and low center of gravity too. Just found this cart at Lowes what do you think about this item?

    http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=129180-52314-129180&lpage=none

    Ray
  15. loggie

    loggie New Member

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    I have the same cart only from tractor supply about $20 less its good and I can put alot of wood on it pulls easy but made a little wimpy as I had to make a few braces to beef it up.I load it about twice as high as the sides its 24"wide but it gets tipsy. it also has a convertible hitch to connect to a garden tractor.It fits thru a single door which is nice.Eric's cart looks good too.
  16. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

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    steel wheels: no idea, other than farm sales. Bassically same version as erics cart justlower cg and larger diameter wheels. I think the rubber tireed versions are more modern. the lower the weight, better and more stable, but sord ot depends on what you can find. Don't go cheap with plans to reinforce, though. I've done so many of those 'cheap' projects than end up more time andm oney than buying quality to start with. Then modeify to suit lyour needs, that's different than patching a poor design.

    k
  17. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    I had a $10.00 off card from Lowes and bought it... Could have bought it assembled for same price but decided to assemble it myself.. Not a bad cart for $75.00.. BTW I just checked Tractor Supply which at least 1 hr. from here and an equivalent cart is $109.00.. Think I did OK on that deal... Just brought a "small" load of wood in and the cart wasn't even full and I have enough for at least 2 days... The cart I bought has the 13" wheels and it seems very stable too.. This cart can be pulled with a garden tractor too and comes with the hitch and also has a flimsy plastic liner in the bottom plus a tray to place your garden tools on..

    Ray
  18. jebatty

    jebatty Minister of Fire

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  19. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    I just picked up one of the 4-wheeled carts from Tractor Supply - $109, for the 1200lb capacity, 24" wide, 48" long, with convertible hitch and removable "stake" sides. Does real well when pulling, pushing it backwards is a bit awkward, and I have yet to figure out how to back it up more than a few feet when hooked to the lawn tractor. Now I push it back to where I want to be by hand, load it up, and then back the lawn tractor in, hook up and drag it out. I made a ramp out of 2x4's to allow me to roll big rounds up into it.

    It's a bit of a pain to switch from the hand pull mode to the tractor hitch, but not bad. The construction is a bit on the light side - it is adequate, but not indestructible - I've bent the steering gear once trying to back it up with the tractor, but it straightened out OK. The deck is on the light side, but it doesn't seem to bend - I might want to back it up with some plywood, especially if carrying loads that are real concentrated. However I've picked up a fair number of big rounds with it, and so far no problems.

    I have one of the HF two wheeled log carts that I use to bring the firewood inside, and it works great for small rounds and splits outside, but I find it tends to get unhappy if I try to carry large rounds with it, and the really big (20"+) are impossible to load into it. With the 4 wheel cart I can roll a few big rounds onto the cart, run a cargo strap around it to hold them on, and go... For reasonable use I think this is a good solution. I would not think it is an ideal solution if needing to handle really rough terrain

    Gooserider
  20. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    The one I bought at Lowes I think is pretty much the same as yours but cheaper plus it somes with a removable tray that you can place your garden tools and other small items on... This one also has a thin plastic liner which I punched holes into so it doesn't hold water.. I added a scrap of 3/4" plywood to protect the bottom.. It's a good cart for short money and easily fits several days of wood in one shot... It has a hitch which I don't use so backing it up is no problem for me.. Now I need a wheelbarrow or yardcart for other stuff I need to do..

    Ray
  21. reaperman

    reaperman Member

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    It sounds like you like your big red wagon. Maybe you can get your hands on a old plastic shopping cart and modify it with some larger tires. The plastic on the shopping carts seem pretty durable and will never weather.
  22. d.n.f.

    d.n.f. New Member

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    I have something like that in those pics except it has particle board sides. That way I can use it for wood and the wife uses it for gardening.
    The bike tires are great cause you can change the air pressure depending on conditions.
  23. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Update on the red cart from Tractor Supply...

    Mixed bag... I got the wood out of our back lot that I purchased the cart to do, mostly it worked pretty well, no problem with the 18-20" diameter by 18" long rounds I was getting about 3 at a time, plus usually some small stuff. I just learned not to try to back the thing up with the lawn tractor, as that would cause a jacknife and bend the steering gear...

    I made a ramp out of some 2x4's, about 4' long, that worked great for loading the rounds which were to big to lift easily.

    However I am now going to need to make some significant repairs and reinforcing on it... The next door neighbor had some 36"+ diameter logs that he was willing to give me if I cut them up and hauled them away... I had no troubles cutting them up into 18" rounds with my Dolmar, but when I tried to roll the first round onto the cart I had big problems... The first attempt ended when the weight of the round on the ramp levered the front of the cart up and flipped it backwards. The second attempt I had the neighbor hold the front end down while I rolled the round onto the cart, and it broke the metal grid out of the frame in the back, and smashed the load platform down onto 3 of the 4 wheels...

    After I rolled the round back off the cart, I was able to pry the deck up enough to get it to roll again, but it isn't happy, I definitely need to do some significant reinforcing. I'm thinking if I can get a peice of 3/4" plywood the size of the deck, and bolt it to each cross member I should be strong enough, I hope.

    I'm not sure what the round weighed, but I don't think it was more than the 1200 lbs the cart is supposedly good for - assuming my estimates of 36" diameter, and 18" thick, it's about 10.6 cubic foot of green maple... IIRC most green hardwood is about 50lbs / cu. ft. so that would only be about 500-600 lbs, but as I said earlier, I think the rating is mostly for well distributed loads, not a concentrated load like that round was.

    Gooserider
  24. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Hi Gooserider,
    I think you hit the nail on the head about the load being evenly distributed.. A log that heavy puts a large amount of weight on a small area so it would damage the wagon pretty easy however as you mentioned a piece of 3/4" plywood would make a big difference preventing damage.. I only have used mine for hauling splits from my wood pile to the front door and it does that very well.. Right now Lowes has that cart on special for $74.88, a great deal for something so handy..

    Ray
  25. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    I agree, the problem was probably the concentrated weight. I have a two wheel cart that I use to move splits from the woodshed into the house (easier to climb stairs with it) but I've moved splits and smaller rounds with the wagon, where the load is well distributed and not had a problem with it, or at least not much of one...

    Gooserider
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