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First Fire in new stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Treemoss, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Today was the first fire in my stove. I was burning some kindling to get a hot fast fire. Then a half hour later added some little pieces of wood. Then a hour later some medium size wood. I added some more medium size pieces again 1 more time a hour later. Now it's been 4 hours later and is cooling down. I think 4 hours should be good for the first break in fire. I will do the same fire on Friday. Hopefully after that fire I won't have any smell from the paint curing.

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  2. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Well, usually the first burn is just the kindling fire. Regardless, you're off to the races now and it looks like it got hot. What was the max temp on the stove?
  3. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    That seems a bit hot for the first fire but perhaps this stove will be okay with it. I'm not so sure about adding wood that often either. Rather than adding a little bit after an hour and then again after another hour. Why not just put the wood in and let the stove do it's thing? But I understand with a new stove it is common to want to fiddle with it. Have fun.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    The draft looks decent. Was there any smoke spillage when you opened the door for loading? How far closed was the air control at full burn?
  5. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    I don't know how hot the stove was. I have to wait for the stoveThermometer this week. There was 1 time the top of the stove was smoking for about 10 min. I guess that was the paint curing. I never had any smoke enter the room from starting it to reloading it. So guess the draft is going to be ok. Should I load up the stove next fire and lower the air for a longer burn. Or run the same small hot fire for 4hrs until the 3rd fire.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    You have already passed the small fire stage. Might as well start it up again. But this time pay attention to how the air control affects the fire.

    Closing down the air will intensify secondary burning and will get the stove hotter. Load it up like before and then incrementally lower the air supply. Lower it until the fire just starts to get lazy and stop. Let it burn like this until the flame grows regain intensity. Then repeat the lowering of the air supply until the flame are lazy again. By now you should be down to about 3/4 closed. Repeat if you can (depending on draft this may be the ideal running spot for the air control).
  7. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Should I wait for the thermometer, or just load it up and run it like you said. I just didn't know if it was ready to run like that. I might just run one more medium fire then run fully loaded.
  8. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    No need to wait with that same amount of wood. I would hold off on the full load until you have done a couple test runs learning how the stove behaves with the air controlled down. A thermometer will help you learn what is happening too.
  9. Nick Mystic

    Nick Mystic Minister of Fire

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    If it was me I would get the thermometer and read the stove manual to find out where the manufacturer recommends placing it on the stove to get your readings. No rush with building big fires before you know more about what the stove is doing. The last thing you want to do with a brand new stove is go too hot right out of the box and end up damaging it. You mentioned on your first fire you had the paint on the top smoking for about ten minutes and that makes me think that might have been a bit more heat than what you usually do on the initial break in fire. Good luck with the new stove.
  10. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    So you're saying the urge to fiddle with it goes away after time? Or does it get diverted to that new chainsaw that you picked up cheap on Craigslist because the previous owner couldn't get it started...

    :)

    Matt
  11. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    I think I will do another fire today and see if it smell again. Then add more wood to get a feel of the stove.
  12. mass_burner

    mass_burner Minister of Fire

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    the manufacter for my Morso insert said to start 5 fires letting each cool down at increasing heat and duration before a full fire. I did it, but it seemed a bit over cautious
  13. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    The manufacturer says 30 to 40 hours till break in.

    The first fire(s) in your appliance will be difficult to get going and keep going with little amount of heat being generated. This is a result of the moisture being driven out of the fire brick. Allow 30 to 40 hours of hot fires (temperatures in excess of 500°F - 600°F) before your appliance will perform normally. During the break-in period (the first 2 or 3 fires) create only small, hot fires using kindling; this will allow the firebrick to cure. Do not be alarmed if small hairline cracks develop in the firebrick. This is a normal occurrence and does not pose a safety hazard. The paint may also smell a little for the first few fires as it cures and you may wish to open a door or window to alleviate the smell

    I guess I did the first 2. Now the 3rd. 30 to 40 hrs sounds a lot. I only have 7 hrs in the stove and maybe 4 more today.
  14. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Wow. That is a lot of time for breaking in a stove. However, they should know best how to run their stoves.
  15. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe... Minister of Fire

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    Well according to what you wrote the 30-40 hours is more for your stove to start working the way it is meant to as opposed to breaking in the fire brick and curing the paint, which you need 3-4 small and short fires, ( I think your first fire of 4 hours was too long, but it's done) I think after the 40 hours the machine is acustomed and ready to produce greater heat as long as you use dry wood. Sorry if confusing but what I'm trying to say is you have 2 different break ins for this stove.
  16. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    When I called napoleon they told me to run a 8 hr fire. I thought that was odd and was kind of long so I cut it in half.
    The second fire was another 4 hrs. The third is about the same. For the first three fires I am just adding 3 to 4 small to medium size pieces in the stove for the first three hrs. Then let the fire die out completely so the stove is cold. I run the stove with the air open full and the door cracked for the first 15 min.
  17. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe... Minister of Fire

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    Well you are on your way, I'm sure things will be just fine, your post made me go read my manual last night and I can really understand what I'm reading now that I had a season to work with it. Congratulations, your gonna love it....
  18. USMC80

    USMC80 Minister of Fire

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    on my hampton it says three break in fires, i've had four including one overnight and its still curing the paint. Definitely need one more
  19. Treemoss

    Treemoss Member

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    Wow, I had a 5hr run last night. Not that hot tho. I did play with the air intake. My wood burns up fast. Even if I put the air all the way in it still pulls the flames out and burns the wood up quick. I think I should run a good 12 hr burn now and load it halfway and see about the low slow burns to get to know my stove more.
  20. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    I'd save the wood. It's too warm right now in LI to need a fire.
  21. 1750

    1750 Feeling the Heat

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    begreen - would you be willing to explain the first sentence. You are saying reducing air into the stove increases the heat the stove is putting out? I'd like to understand that concept, but can't get my head around it.

    Thanks!
  22. toddnic

    toddnic Feeling the Heat

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    Congrats on your first fire! Isn't it a wonderful feeling to know that you can heat your house with wood and not electricity, gas or oil. I installed a Progress Hybrid over the summer and it has taken about four fires to get rid of most of the paint smell. We have only gotten it to 500 degrees so far so we might still have some additional paint seasoning when we open it up to 600 degrees. Hope your stove seasoning goes quickly.
  23. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    When you start closing down the primary air supply the draft starts pulling more air through the secondary manifold. This draws heated air into the bloom of hot wood gases coming off the splits. This super heats the fire and raises the stove top temperature. This reburn of the wood gases is a large part of the reason why modern stoves are much more efficient.

    More on the topic here:
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/whats-the-point-of-secondary-air.24782/
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/physics-of-secondary-combustion.110215/
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/lopi-answer-secondary-burn-tube-function.105266/
  24. Ram 1500 with an axe...

    Ram 1500 with an axe... Minister of Fire

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    My insert manual states that it will burn hotter when fully open, hotter and faster, shutting it down will make it last longer...
  25. 1750

    1750 Feeling the Heat

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    That's brilliant and your explanation is very clear and concise.

    Thanks for taking the time to explain this and provide those links.

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