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Fisher Fireplace Insert Project

Post in 'Fisher Stove Information, Parts, History and More' started by BigZ_87, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    A couple of weeks ago I started the process of buying and installing a Fisher fireplace insert. I happened to find the insert at a local fireplace store on consignment with a fresh coat of paint, none of the firebricks broken, and ready to install. To be honest, I was at first overwhelmed at to how it works and how to install it due to the fact that I grew up with a free standing Grandpa Bear at both my parents and grandparents houses, but after a few questions and a little help from Coaly, I was ready to get started. The following pictures should speak for themselves as far as what was fabricated and process.

    IMG_20140206_182910384.jpg IMG_20140207_132453630.jpg IMG_20140208_161719963.jpg IMG_20140210_185834122.jpg IMG_20140210_191340337.jpg IMG_20140211_182057861.jpg
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2014
    coaly likes this.

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  2. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Excellent ! Those pictures make it look a lot easier than it was I'm sure.

    Is the front polished yet?

    Here's the simplest tip for the original look;
    This finish was called the "Contemporary" style, and the draft cap finish is shown below. Some caps have a mill finish accomplished with Scotch Bright. (black doors) Others had polished edges. Lacquer thinner removes the paint easily to see if it's polished before trying Scotch Bright. It really sets it off.

    Grandma Baro 6 9-2011.jpg

    Here's the two finishes the caps came in; Brushed on left, Polished on right.

    Alum. Brushed on L.  Polished on R..JPG

    New old stock before paint on left ; Painted with edges wiped on right.
    If I can do it, anyone can.

    Alum. before and after 2.JPG I polish edges with Maas metal polish, paint, and wipe the uncured paint off edges with mineral spirits. If already painted, you need to use thinner to remove cured paint, then polish.
  3. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    It was a beast to actually get in the fireplace and then hook the liner up to it. Everything else wasn't too bad. There are parts of the doors that are polished, but whoever painted it before I bought it, they painted the caps. I am going wipe the edges clean as you suggested when it gets spring. We have a fire going in it this morning, and I am very impressed with how much heat it puts out with that little blower going.
  4. wenger7446

    wenger7446 Member

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    Nice! You have a liner and a block off plate installed?
  5. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    I have a liner and a block off plate installed. I just forgot to take pictures before we sit the insert in place, and it was too heavy to move for a picture lol.
  6. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    I'm looking at doing the very same thing. Just picked up a stove on Craigslist and was asking in another thread what to do to connect the SS liner to the stove. Coaly sent me the link to your thread.

    A few questions:
    1. I noticed in the stove you have a metal plate sitting atop two fire bricks. Did the stove come with that or did you build that yourself. Mine does not have it and it's currently just one big open space.
    2. What kind of sealant did you use for the adapter?
    3. Where did you get the adapter?
    4. Did you notch the adapter out or drill a hole for the damper?

    Thanks
    Alex
  7. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    1. The stove did not come with that. I measured, cut, welded, and put it in place myself. It has greatly helped with distributing heat as well as keeping flames from going up the pipe when the damper is open.
    2. I just used the Rutland 2000 degree fireplace cement in gray. It sealed up hard and tight, and it is heated rated.
    3. I made the adapter myself. All the ones I found online did not have the slope/degree that I wanted to connect my chimney liner directly to. I have access to a metal show so it was a lot easier that buying one after I measured everything and laid it out how I wanted it. There are several good ones that can be purchased. Just search for insert boot adapter, and it should show you what you need.
    4. I drilled a hole through where the rod of the adapter would be so it would be as tight as possible, but I did have to notch out the bottom of the bracket so it would fit over the damper. The way that the damper and rod are welded together makes it impossible to fit the adapter to the top without notching it out.

    If you have any more questions, don't hesitate to ask.
  8. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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  9. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    Thanks Coaly
    I appreciate all the info that is on this site. If it had not been for a lot of info that Coaly pointed me to, there would have been no way for me to know what direction to even start looking in.

    Alex:
    If you want any of the measurements or templates that I laid out for my install, I would be more that glad to pass it along. Just remember you would have to confirm that stuff would fit your stove since each one has the possibility of being a little different measurement wise.
  10. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    The baffle, did you design it that way for a purpose or just left over metal? I've been reading on several threads and there seems to be some calculations that people do for this. Don't know much about baffles so not sure. How is your baffle working out? If good, can you send me the dimensions? I noticed you had notched out the front left and right side.

    Been itching to try out my welder.::-)
  11. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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  12. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    I'd love the dimensions.
    Thanks
  13. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    I will post up the dimensions when I get home.
  14. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    Here are the dimensions for the baffle. I had to cut in narrow enough for it to go though my door on an angle at the widest point.

    Baffle Dimensions.jpg
  15. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    Excellent, thank-you. Also, what gauge steel did you use? Also, with the insert boot, are those bolts or metal screws attaching it to the stove? I like the compactness of your boot. Some of the one's I'm seeing are much wider? Do you have the dimensions on that as well and the gauge that you used for it? I think it will be cheaper for me to fab it myself.

    Thanks
  16. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    For the baffle inside the heater, I used 1/4" plate steel, and for the brackets underneath, just some angle iron I had laying around. For the boot adapter, it was 1/8' thick or 11 gauge, and the screws that are holding it down are just self tapping metal screws. The round part of the boot adapter is a piece of 6'' round steel about 2'' tall that allows the liner to slide down on it good and tight, and it the liner is help in place with self tapping metal screws.. Maybe this picture will help explain the measurements.

    Insert Boot Adapter.png
  17. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    I'm assuming that you used a 6" liner? I can't recall the measurement of the flue on my stove but I think it was a little over 6" but not quite 8" so I didn't know if I needed a 6 or 8" liner.
  18. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    One more question. I noticed in your pictures that you have a metal piece extending from the front top of the stove in a diagonal. Is that a heat shield for the mantel?
  19. BigZ_87

    BigZ_87 New Member

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    I did use a 6" liner. The opening in the top of my insert measured 7 1/2" so I went with the 6" liner. My chimney is only about 14' tall, and it has a perfect draft for my insert. Because of the price difference between the 6" liner and the 8" liner, it made it easy for me to choose.

    It came with the insert, and it helps deflect heat away from the wall/mantel. It works great when combined with a blower to help circulate the heat out into the room.
  20. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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  21. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    Hey Coaly, I noticed today that the angle iron that secures the back brick on the top side has broken off. Should I look at welding it back or does it matter?
  22. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    I may try and make one for mine. I measured my flue and it also measures 7 1/2". My Chimney height, however, will probably be more in the 20-25'. 6" would be cheaper and would be easier to get through the 5 1/2" fireplace damper that is already installed but I wonder if I should be looking at the 8" pipe?

    Thanks again.
  23. coaly

    coaly Fisher Moderator Staff Member

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    Is it a long piece that holds all the bricks, or a clip that only holds one or the corner of two?
    If they stay tight to the back it's fine.
  24. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    Its a long piece on the back that holds the bricks in place. They seems to be staying tight without it. There are two other similar long pieces of angle iron holding the side brick in place. They seem to be ok.
  25. arodrigz

    arodrigz Member

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    So here is another of my crude drawings (definitely not to scale). My stove is about 21" tall if I recall so I will definitely need a shield because the mantel is too low. BigZ, could you measure your shield and post that. I'll need to make one of those.

    How about the hearth Coaly? I've tried to identify what it is made of but it's hard to tell. I can look from the basement up and from inside the fireplace on the edge of the hearth but that's about as good as it gets. My current hardwood floor is level with the tile on the hearth but this is a newer floor laid atop another hardwood floor. Also, you will notice that inside the fireplace the floor drops 1 1/2 inches. In order to keep the 1 1/2" min clearance from the picture that you put up, I will need to prop the stove up on something. Am I understanding that correctly?

    [​IMG]

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