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Garage Heater

Post in 'The Gear' started by Martin Strand III, Dec 13, 2005.

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  1. Martin Strand III

    Martin Strand III New Member

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    Hey Outhere:

    What's the skinney on options for heating a 24' x 34' (about 800 sq ft) insulated attached garage with a 9' ceiling?

    The place is rough plummed for propane; original idea was a propane heater.

    It seems any burning device with vehicles (gasoline, etc) must be some kind of code issue.

    Anybody know the real deal?

    Aye,
    Marty

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  2. Willhound

    Willhound Feeling the Heat

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    Probabley depends on where you are. I know that we are OK (Northern Ontario) with wood heat in a garage, as long as the garage or shop is not attached to your house, and stove must also be a minimum distance (18" I believe) from the floor in case of propane leaks (BBQ's, soldering torch etc.)

    They don't consider gasoline fumes because there isn't supposed to be any gas containers stored indoors. Everyone does though. According to local by-laws all your gas cans are supposed to be stored outdoors, away from any other buildings and in a properly vented, and preferabley metal enclosure.

    Willhound
  3. saichele

    saichele Minister of Fire

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    The practical issue is elevating the flame above the floor because gasoline vapors tend to pool. best case is one of those overhead warehouse heaters, But a woodstove on a 30" pedestal passes code here.

    That said, lots of people are using kerosene or LP salamanders and convection heaters. Few manage to blow themselves up.

    Rules also tend to relax a bit if it's a detached garage.

    Steve
  4. SeanD

    SeanD New Member

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    Check with your homeowner's insurance company. Mine (Erie Insurance) had no problem with a wood stove (properly installed) in the home, but absolutely refused to insure a home with a wood stove in the garage.
  5. saichele

    saichele Minister of Fire

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    Here we start to tread the line between code and safe. A woodstove may not be either to code or to the insurance company's liking, but certainly isn't any more dangerous than the unregulated keorsene convection heater.

    The salamanders (little jet engine heaters) are probably the safest of the cheap/portable alternatives, at least as long as you don't have overpowering gas fumes intnhe building. seems like it'd be tough to have flame go backwards through the fan, and if you light a little gas vapor inthe combustion area so what? Just extra heat...

    But again, if you've got LP plumbed out there, you're probably best off (safety and code) with the overhead heaters. Saw one at Menards for 350 the other day. Might not ahve been all that good, but maybe a good one's 500?

    Steve
  6. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    NFPA 211
    Chapter 9 Solid Fuel- Burning Appliances

    9-2.3
    Solid fuel-burning appliances shall not be installed in any location where gasoline or any other flamable vapors or gasses are likely present

    9-2.4
    Solid fuel-burning appliances shall not be installed in any residential garage

    Whether they be 18" or ten feet above the floor Cars in garages do vent fumes through the fill vent. Every car need the vent or it would be impossible to fill your tank. Last year I posted a picture on the forum where this actually happened. The gas tank fumes ignited and nothing was left after the explosion. Including most of the attached house
  7. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    Wouldn't this same apply for things such as Kerosene heaters, Propane heaters, or any type of flame that could ignite those fumes? Of course installed is a loose term here since Kerosene etc...heaters are portable.
  8. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    I have my stove in the garage. No mess in the house, and I spend most of my free time there.

    Whats needed is common sense. I used a Kerosene heater for years, but at 2 bucks a gallon, its not cost effective. I really cannot imagine a wood stove being more of a threat than an open flame 4 inches from the floor. I didn't try to rebuild carbs on top of the kerosene heater either.

    I would be much more paranoid with a natural gas or propane heater in my garage. Always see on the news about houses blowing up from gas leaks.

    I friend of mine burnt his garage down with a light bulb. Trying to un-gel some diesel in his tractors injector pump.

    My house is brand new with R-10 garage doors. Despite my best intentions, there are numerous air leaks. Thats the saving grace. I would be 30 times more paranoid with my stove in the basement and ANY kind of gas appliance in the house, period.

    By the way, all modern automobiles have pressurized fuel systems that don't leak vapors. You can fill your car with gas because the vent runs from on top of the tank to a port just below the fill nozel. It vents to the atmosphere during fill ups. This is why you get the check engine light on new cars if you don't tighten the gas cap properly.
  9. bruce

    bruce Member

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    i would agree, i never heard of anything happening with wood stoves in garages, i wouldnt be spraying brake cleaner like crazy with any heater going! use your head!
  10. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Hey elk,

    Is there an exception for an appliance in an airtight enclosure that draws all its combustion from outside?
  11. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Sufice to say none obtained permits or had inspections? Are you advocating I'm willing to take the risk so others foolish enough should follow my total disegard for codes, inspections, safety, and health. I thought Hearthnet was about helping others. What help is your advice? Or is the case I didnot know is was wrong never asked a code official so now I am trying to justify blatant ingorance.

    Please argue your case stating actual testing or satistics. NoT I think, because you already proved you did not think. Name one wood stove listed for installation in a garage? Hummm it pretty quite around here. What did you manual say about hazzardous locations ?

    Sorry me, It takes reading to find that That can be construded as an intelligent act

    Sorry to all to be so blunt. If I told you you would loose you finger if you stuck in in the barrell of my shotgun do I have to pull the trigger to make my point.. And you Didn't think it would hurt?
  12. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Just asking a question. I guess the short answer would be "no."
  13. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    When we moved here we bought our new 32'X35' 1120 sq ft. "Garage" and it came with a detached 1800 sq ft house , ha . Put a wood stove in it , stove is set up like code to a house would be . More of a shop than a garage , bathroom , TV ect... All Gas , Kerosene and such are not stored in the garage/shop and the cars , trucks & suv's sit out side. The motorcycle sits in its own shed.

    Attached Files:

  14. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Good grief! Here I was sitting so proud of my 28' X 28' garage. Now I have to tear it down and start over.

    I hate this Forum!
  15. bruce

    bruce Member

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    i heat my garage with wood, 32x48 , will get a propane heater ceiling mount just to keep the chill out and burn wood when i work out there(next years plan)
    if you want trouble you will find it, if you want safe heat the humans have to make it that way, remember guns dont kill people, people kill people, same with cars same with careless wood burning, if your cleaning auto parts in gas 5 ft from the fire and you end up in the front yard thats your fault!
  16. Roospike

    Roospike New Member

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    I have a floor roll around jet blast heater for the garage also ........ it would take too long to heat up the garage with just the wood stove so i run the blast heater for 15 minutes and let the wood stove take it from there. $2.79 a gallon for Kerosene this year. ouch
  17. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    And if you want the insurance company to rebuild the house after you pick yourself up out of the yard you have to think a little ahead of time.
  18. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    Ya gotta love the FUD factor. Made plenty of people appear knowledgable and wealthy.

    What in the world is a garage, other than a room with a big door?

    LMAO.
  19. mtcone

    mtcone New Member

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    I know this is kind of an old thread, but if anyone ever has any questions about what size heater to use in their garage, try using a Heat Load Calculator.


    Good luck.


    :)
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