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Good firewood on Long Island (nassau)?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by stevekstevek, Dec 22, 2008.

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  1. stevekstevek

    stevekstevek New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    Messages:
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    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    Don't know if this is appropriate, but I've noticed several people here from the Island.

    I just started burning this year (just got an insert 3 weeks ago), and didn't stock up on wood beforehand. I have about 1/4 cord on hand, which is a mix or relatively dry stuff and not-so-dry.

    I'm looking for any recommendations from anyone on good places to get either seasoned stuff for this year, or green stuff for next year -- reasonable prices and trusted places.

    The stuff I've bought this year all seems like it hasn't been seasoned well enough. _some_ of the pieces are checked and bark coming off, but too many others don't -- and, I've seen a couple of pieces of the softwoods I've ended up with where I could see the water bubbling up through cracks in the wood!

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  2. Chief Ryan

    Chief Ryan New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    Messages:
    172
    Loc:
    Long Island NY
    Where in Nassau do you live. There is a place called Prianti farms (not sure of the spelling) up where 231 splits to Jericho Trpk where i have bought in the past. They'll give you a true cord 4x4x8 stacked or very close for around 250 or so. As far as it being seasoned that i don't know.

    Us LI'ers don't have much competition with burning wood. In the spring and a little bit in the fall you can pickup boat loads for free.
  3. 88steve

    88steve New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    Messages:
    21
    Loc:
    li ,ny
    TRY LI FIREWOOD.COM THEY ARE PRICEY BUT WORTH IT IN MY OPINION, THEY HAVE KILN DRIED WOOD THAT WILL BURN GREAT I GOT A PALLET THIS PAST SAT AND CANT BELIEVE HOW GOOD IT BURNS.
  4. stevekstevek

    stevekstevek New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
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    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    I actually bought a 1/4 cord from them -- picked it up in the minivan :)

    Don't like to talk bad, and I haven't used a moisture-meter on the wood I got, but I can say:

    - It's about 50% softwoods (pine or fir)
    - I don't think it's well seasoned -- my first tip was that they're splitting right out near where they're selling -- and then they put the fresh splits into a front-loader, and from there it went into their truck. Now, I asked, and they said "oh, that's going to our place on the south shore to season for next year". Hmm, I'm guessing that's going right to someone for a delivery..

    Anyway, they give you wood from out of a greenhouse -- the wood's still got good color to it, not greyish like I'm guessing well seasoned stuff should be (unless seasoning under cover keeps the color in it).

    Some of it seems light and seasoned, and some of it even had checks, but other pieces seemed way too heavy to be anything but fresh.
  5. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    7,348
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    Seasoning under cover keeps the color in it.
  6. Ducati996

    Ducati996 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Messages:
    38
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    If you picked it up then shame on you for not being able to tell between hardwoods and not

    sounds like you dont know enough about wood in general to give accurate feedback? wood being heavy tells you little-unless you know if its oak or willow - measuring mositure tells the story
  7. stevekstevek

    stevekstevek New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    Messages:
    13
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    I know enough to get me in trouble, I think :)

    I can recognize oak, by the grain and weight, having worked with it enough on flooring and such. Other than that, I can figure out softwoods/hardwoods with a fingernail test, but don't really know enough to recognize things when they're on a pile. I got some wood somewhere else, and it was too long to fit into the stove, so I cut some of those splits in half with a chopsaw, and they sure looked like maple to me (I built some stuff out of maple too).

    So, since I'm doubly new here -- both to stoves and to recognizing wood, I'm going on what I'm reading, and it's hard to translate that into practice (i.e. knocking two splits together to hear the sound, judging color, or even seeing if my stove is starting up fast enough to indicate the wood is dry or not). Maybe I should just get a meter so I'd be able to actually measure moisture content. Anyway, that's why I figure the best way is to ask for recommendations!
  8. Ducati996

    Ducati996 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    Messages:
    38
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    There cords unstacked are $275 and more, stacking is over $300...taxes and delivery appear to be extra :)

    I have been hearing mixed results - but overall folks dont know the difference between wet wood and unseasoned. When the wood is air dried in lots, it gets wet from the rain (especially the down falls we have had the last few weeks) - they expect dry wood which isnt practical or possible.

    I even sold wood to someone who bought from Prianti - they were ranting and raving about how bad it was. I did a moisture test on it and it was below 20%. Nothing wrong with the wood - they were using an insert and inserts being a little more difficult to get going, doing the paper and kindling route (PIA in my opinion), and blaming the wood as not seasoned.
  9. stevekstevek

    stevekstevek New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2008
    Messages:
    13
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    Well, I do know enough to know a little wetness on the surface isn't a problem, but I don't know enough to really be able to tell if the inside is dry. I know to look for checking (some pieces have, most don't), bark falling off (softer woods seem to have that, but not harder ones), grey/washed out colors (but, it appears that this won't happen if it's seasoned under cover), sound (can't judge too well).

    Comparing their prices to Craigslist, they don't seem so bad if they're reputable and give a good product? (and, comparing what the people in southern Mass say they're paying here).
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